Catholic school – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 04:30:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Catholic school – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 Rowers unleash the power https://odessasem.com/rowers-unleash-the-power/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 04:30:35 +0000 https://odessasem.com/rowers-unleash-the-power/ Reading time: 2 minutes Rowers power through the water during the Sydney Catholic Schools Mini Rowing Regatta. Photo: Supplied By Tasmyn Haynes No room for prima donnas: students learn that when it comes to rowing, everyone has to be in sync – all the time and no matter what On a picturesque Sunday morning, pupils […]]]>

Reading time: 2 minutes

Rowers power through the water during the Sydney Catholic Schools Mini Rowing Regatta. Photo: Supplied

By Tasmyn Haynes

No room for prima donnas: students learn that when it comes to rowing, everyone has to be in sync – all the time and no matter what

On a picturesque Sunday morning, pupils from various Catholic schools gathered at the St George Rowing Club to row their boats – but not gently down the creek.

Instead, spectators were treated to lightning speed, phenomenal displays of power and races too close to be advertised at the Sydney Catholic Schools Mini Rowing Regatta (SCS) .

In the lead up to the regatta, the students were given a new opportunity to learn and develop their skills in the sport through a five-week basic rowing programme.

Participants have become early risers, athletes, teammates – and members of the St George Rowing Club.

The partnership between the club and the SCS has opened up opportunities for students like Robert Ollivier of De La Salle College Caringbah who want to continue playing the sport.

“My dad was rowing in high school and he was competitive, so when it [opportunity] came out, me and my best mate wanted to do it,” the 10th grader said.

“I’ve enjoyed it the whole time – so who knows where I’ll end up in the future?

“These kids could join my rowing group at the club right now… That’s how we designed the program, so when they’re done they have the membership and the ability to continue afterward”

“But I want to represent my school and row with the club.”

The route Robert wants to take is also the one encouraged by St George Rowing Club manager and vice-captain Mark Featherstone.

“These kids could be joining my rowing group at the club right now,” he said.

“That’s how we did the program, so when they’re done they have the buy-in and the ability to continue after that.”

With the first basic rowing program being a success, SCS is offering two more identical sessions open to new participants, including those who may have missed the initial program due to its popularity.

The regatta gave the athletes the chance to show what they had learned over the five weeks through a number of races.

Supporters lined the quayside to watch, with sausages sizzling in hand and music playing in the background, creating the perfect atmosphere for the rowing festival.

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Concerned resident calls for inquiry into Catholic school board voting incident in Cambridge https://odessasem.com/concerned-resident-calls-for-inquiry-into-catholic-school-board-voting-incident-in-cambridge/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/concerned-resident-calls-for-inquiry-into-catholic-school-board-voting-incident-in-cambridge/ Alida Wilms from North Dumfries is calling for a ‘transparent third-party investigation’ into a mistake in the Waterloo Catholic District School Board (WCDSB) trustee election last month in Cambridge. The election, held on October 24, had been interrupted by a declaration of emergency under the Municipal Elections Act because two names were missing from the […]]]>

Alida Wilms from North Dumfries is calling for a ‘transparent third-party investigation’ into a mistake in the Waterloo Catholic District School Board (WCDSB) trustee election last month in Cambridge.

The election, held on October 24, had been interrupted by a declaration of emergency under the Municipal Elections Act because two names were missing from the ballot.

Polls for this particular race reopened in Cambridge on November 7 and will run until November 17. Ballots cast in the October 24 admin race will not be counted.

Wilms submitted a letter about it with 21 supporting signatures regarding the polling incident. She hopes a potential investigation will shed light on how the mistake happened and help ensure something like this doesn’t happen again.

“Voters have to vote again, which I think can also be a problem because municipal elections themselves have a rather low turnout to start with,” Wilms said. “So asking someone to vote twice is quite the request.”

The race is for the three Cambridge-North Dumfries seats. All the names of the candidates appeared as they were intended on the ballot papers in North Dumfries, so voters in this borough will no longer have to vote. They have been sealed and will be counted on Friday.

However, those in Cambridge will have to return to the polls for the trustee race, as that municipality’s ballot papers were missing two names.

Polls for the new election close on Friday. (Gary Graves/CBC)

“Right now it’s the Catholic school board, but if we can’t understand what happened and we can’t put the measures in place to avoid it in the future, that will be fine. a mayor next time or a regional president or whatever,” Wilms said.

“So this investigation also calls for public participation so people can say when they notice their ballots were incorrect and also make a public report because when something like that happens I think a lot of people start to have questions that could erode confidence in our electoral system.”

She said the letter was sent to Cambridge Mayor Kathryn McGarry and Mayor-elect Jan Liggett, as well as Premier Doug Ford and Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing Steve Clark.

“The news has made my heart sink to think of my supporters and volunteers who have worked so hard to bring me to October 24,” Marisa Phillips, a candidate for the Cambridge WCDSB board, said in a written statement. last month.

“I’m worried for all those people who trusted me because maybe they don’t realize that their votes don’t count,” she added.

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A Trans Catholic Teacher Explains the Importance of LGBTQ Visibility https://odessasem.com/a-trans-catholic-teacher-explains-the-importance-of-lgbtq-visibility/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 09:03:48 +0000 https://odessasem.com/a-trans-catholic-teacher-explains-the-importance-of-lgbtq-visibility/ In August this year, Suella Braverman (then Attorney General, now Home Secretary) said it was “lawful” for schools to name trans children dead in education. In July, Nadim Zahawi (Chairman of the Conservative Party) raised fears of a new Article 28 for trans people when he said he wanted to protect young people from ‘harmful […]]]>

In August this year, Suella Braverman (then Attorney General, now Home Secretary) said it was “lawful” for schools to name trans children dead in education.

In July, Nadim Zahawi (Chairman of the Conservative Party) raised fears of a new Article 28 for trans people when he said he wanted to protect young people from ‘harmful and inappropriate nonsense forced upon them by radical activists’ .

This is why people like 29-year-old George White are so important in British schools.

George is trans, and he teaches religious education at St Paul’s Catholic School in Evington, Leicestershire – where he went to school as a teenager.

He says it’s “really important” for kids to hear about LGBTQ+ issues from an early age and hopes his journey and openness to being trans will help others struggling with their gender identity. .

“Whatever the beliefs of the child or the family, at some point in life they are going to meet someone different,” he told PinkNews.

“I think it’s virtually impossible to follow the Christian call to love your neighbor if you don’t know what your neighbor might be going through.”

George White is a Catholic and transgender religious education teacher at St Paul’s Catholic School in Evington. (George White)

He acknowledges that not everyone needs to fully understand each other, but says it’s important to be “compassionate” and “recognize that you’re talking to another human and not a statistic or something. that you read in a book”.

“When I tell my story, I noticed a real change in attitude in the children that you wouldn’t necessarily expect.

“This aspect of the story gives us a level of humanity that facilitates compassion.”

“It doesn’t make you any less of a Christian because you’re reaching out and including LGBTQ+ people”

George thinks there is a ‘misunderstanding of what faith asks us to do’, when used in anti-LGBTQ+ rhetoric, and says he finds negativity around faith and the Catholic religion “particularly disappointing”.

“I think there’s a view that you can get these things [being part of the LGBTQ+ community] away from people,” he says.

“Look at conversion therapy that believes you can take these things away from people.

“It’s an unhealthy way to look at it, it’s not recognizing the vast diversity in which God can create people, and it’s not recognizing the call to love one another.”

George White gives a speech in church
George White works to ensure that the Catholic region is inclusive. (George White)

The 29-year-old says he is involved in “liberal Catholic circles” which “pay attention to what is happening in society”.

George refers to Pope Franciswho is the head of the Catholic Church, as an example of how religion can adapt to become more tolerant.

He happily mentions some of the Pope’s kind acts, which he says include “giving funds to struggling trans people and telling a gay person that God made them that way and has no problem with that.”

“It doesn’t make you any less of a Christian because you’re reaching out and including LGBTQ+ people.

“You have to separate the rules of human experience from what people experience.”

“Include” does not just “tolerate”

George explains that Catholic Church teaching says, “LGBT people should be accepted with sensitivity, compassion and respect, and any signs of unjust discrimination in this regard should be stopped.”

He says all religions should do their best to “include” rather than “just tolerate” those who belong to the LGBTQ+ community.

Moving forward, he thinks it’s important for churches to be open to LGBTQ+ inclusion, which includes recognizing people’s pronouns, celebrating community through inclusive prayers, and offering leadership roles for women.

George White holds a book to which he contributed
George White contributed to this book which is structured around equality law.

Offering advice to young gay men coming to light, George said it was important to “take your time and figure out what’s important to you”.

“I went through a phase where I thought I had to be one or the other,” George shares, while referencing the decision he felt he had to make between his religion and his gender identity.

“It sounds cliché, but it will be fine. There are many more spaces of acceptance than you might think, there are places online, in person, but take your time to understand what is important to you.

He also shares good advice for those who are not supported by those around them: “If you are in a place where people do not respect your identity and your background, go somewhere else.

“Do not stay where you are not wanted, for there are many spaces where you will be recognized as having full human dignity and as a special creation.”

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Students engage in service projects as part of Mother Cabrini’s Giving Day – The News Herald https://odessasem.com/students-engage-in-service-projects-as-part-of-mother-cabrinis-giving-day-the-news-herald/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 11:43:46 +0000 https://odessasem.com/students-engage-in-service-projects-as-part-of-mother-cabrinis-giving-day-the-news-herald/ In only its fourth year, organizers of St. Frances Cabrini Catholic Schools’ Annual Mother Cabrini Giving Day are hoping for some good surprises. After all, they’ve gotten used to pleasant surprises on this day of giving back and giving back to the community. Last year, the 24-hour online, social media-driven effort – named after their […]]]>

In only its fourth year, organizers of St. Frances Cabrini Catholic Schools’ Annual Mother Cabrini Giving Day are hoping for some good surprises.

After all, they’ve gotten used to pleasant surprises on this day of giving back and giving back to the community.

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Private School Vouchers Open Faith Options for Kids of Color https://odessasem.com/private-school-vouchers-open-faith-options-for-kids-of-color/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 13:27:01 +0000 https://odessasem.com/private-school-vouchers-open-faith-options-for-kids-of-color/ MILWAUKEE (AP) — During a break in the hallway between St. Marcus Lutheran Church and its adjoining school, eighth-grade student Annii Kinepoway was quick to explain what she learned to love about the better here – the good Lord and the good grades. “I like knowing that there is someone you can ask for help […]]]>

MILWAUKEE (AP) — During a break in the hallway between St. Marcus Lutheran Church and its adjoining school, eighth-grade student Annii Kinepoway was quick to explain what she learned to love about the better here – the good Lord and the good grades.

“I like knowing that there is someone you can ask for help if you need it. Someone is out there watching you,” she said of her newfound faith, while proudly wearing the tie indicating her academic honors.

Annii’s mother could only afford this educational opportunity because of school choice programs, which 94% of St. Marcus’ 1,160 students in Milwaukee also use.

“It changed our lives for the better,” said Wishkub Kinepoway, a Native American and African American single mother. “She says, ‘I really like St. Marcus because I don’t have to pretend I’m not smart. “”

School choice is one of many education issues that have become a partisan battleground, bringing parents to the polls this fall. A central question is to what extent, if any, taxpayers’ money should pay for private school tuition, as opposed to solely funding public schools. Critics say such programs weaken public schools, whose costs remain high even as students transfer, taking with them some state funding.

The COVID-19 pandemic has heightened tensions. Public schools have often been closed longer than private schools, and prolonged online learning has been linked to significant learning losses.

But many low-income parents in neighborhoods like predominantly African-American North Milwaukee or the Latin American South Side say voucher programs — introduced here three decades ago — are the only way for their children to attend faith-based institutions. They say these schools teach structure and values ​​in a way that public schools are often too overwhelmed to do.

“It’s a huge difference because it’s support in faith and in values,” said Lorena Ramirez, whose four children attend St. Anthony, within walking distance of the South Side Milwaukee home. “I was looking for a school that could help me.”

St. Anthony is one of the largest Catholic schools in the country — 1,500 students on five campuses that are 99% Latino and almost entirely covered by public funds, its president, Rosana Mateo, said. It was founded by German immigrants 150 years ago, just like St. Marcus.

Until the 1960s, urban parochial schools could rely on funding from thriving parishes and a cheap payroll, since nuns often taught for free. Without these supports, schools began charging hefty tuition, now reaching $8,000 to $9,000 per school year, which is unaffordable for most working-class families.

“Our most needy students should have the option of going to private schools,” said Mateo, former deputy superintendent of Milwaukee Public Schools.

The expansion and politicization of voucher programs, however, “no longer targets truly poor children” but rather “disproportionately helps middle-class white students,” said Gary Orfield, an education professor and co-director of the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research found that students of color have lower test scores and pass rates when they attend low-quality private schools because most voucher programs don’t allow transportation to higher-performing schools.

Although faith-based urban schools don’t necessarily outperform all public schools in test scores, their students enjoy better civic outcomes, from college graduation rates to reduced drug use, said Patrick Wolf, a professor of education at the University of Arkansas.

“They contribute more to the community than just educating kids,” Wolf said.

In Omaha, Nebraska — a state Wolf calls a “desert of school choice” — three Catholic schools facing closure have formed a foundation.

They have raised millions of dollars to serve nearly 600 children, 93% of whom are students of color and all of whom are in need of financial assistance, said the Reverend Dave Korth, president of the foundation and pastor of one of the parishes concerned.

Reliable public funds would ensure the sustainability of schools for parents who choose them “not because of burning political issues. They just want their children placed in faith-based environments because they believe they will be better citizens,” Korth said.

Arizona is at the other end of the school choice spectrum — against strong opposition, its governor signed one of the nation’s broadest voucher system expansions, allowing each parent to use public funds to private tuition or other education costs.

One such parent is Jill Voss, who uses tuition assistance to send her three children to Phoenix Christian School PreK-8, where she is an athletic director and physical education teacher. She is an alumnus, as are her parents and grandparents, who were among the first students when the school opened in 1959.

“A big part of the reason we chose Phoenix Christian was because of our family and just knowing my kids were getting a good Christian foundation for their schooling,” Voss said. “The church and having a church family is important to us.”

Diamond Figueroa, a sixth-grade student who attends Phoenix Christian on financial aid along with 98% of her classmates, said she wasn’t always comfortable in public school, even though more many students there were also Hispanic.

“Everyone here is so much nicer and more welcoming,” she said. “I’m not afraid to ask questions.”

These are general spiritual values ​​rather than specific faith-based practices that parents and educators find helpful in preventing the fighting and other aggressive behaviors that have plagued schools recently.

“Let’s say there’s an argument between two kids ready to fight it out,” said Ernie DiDomizio, the principal of St. Catherine’s School, citing an example from this morning of students arguing over sneakers. Milwaukee Catholic School has 130 students, most of them African American and all enrolled in choice programs. “At that time, we prayed for grace and acceptance. In public schools, you can’t do that.

For recent immigrants, especially from Latin America, where Catholic traditions are more visible in public life, faith-based schools help maintain cultural ties.

Learning Mexican folk dances at St. Anthony, for example, helps her children feel more comfortable with their family’s culture, Ramirez said. The public schools where she first sent her eldest “don’t teach much about cultures. Here, there are all kinds and no one is discriminated against.

One of her daughter’s fifth-grade classmates, Evelyn Ramirez, loves St. Anthony’s lesson that God “created the world with good people and not just bad people.”

Catholic schools have historically played a major role in integrating Hispanic immigrants into American culture, especially when public schools were segregated, said Felipe Hinojosa, professor of Latino politics and religion at Texas A&M University.

The continued racial divisions of many urban neighborhoods affect academic performance. St. Marcus is the only school — of 14 in the area that are 80% low-income and 80% African American — where more than 20% of students are fluent in reading, said St. Marcus Superintendent Henry Tyson .

“Parents send their kids to St. Marcus because they’re frustrated with the schools where their kids are failing,” Tyson said. “We want children to know that they are redeemed children of God. It’s transformative for their sense of self.

When she enrolled in St. Marcus last year, Annii was unfamiliar with the prayers and the school uniform.

“The first day…I just stood there looking around, feeling uncomfortable and out of place. … Now I can do whatever I want in my relationship with God,” she said before rushing back to math class.

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Mumphrey reported from Phoenix.

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Associated Press religious coverage receives support through the AP’s collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Diocese plans to move Judge Memorial, Our Lady of Lourdes schools https://odessasem.com/diocese-plans-to-move-judge-memorial-our-lady-of-lourdes-schools/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 00:27:12 +0000 https://odessasem.com/diocese-plans-to-move-judge-memorial-our-lady-of-lourdes-schools/ Friday 04 November 2022 Intermountain Catholic Picture 1 of 2 School officials have struggled for years with space issues at Judge Memorial Catholic High School, which spans just 4.4 acres. By Linda Peterson Intermountain Catholic SALT LAKE CITY — To help ensure a viable future for Catholic education in Utah, the Diocese of Salt Lake […]]]>

Friday 04 November 2022

Intermountain Catholic

Picture 1 of 2

School officials have struggled for years with space issues at Judge Memorial Catholic High School, which spans just 4.4 acres.

By Linda Peterson

Intermountain Catholic

SALT LAKE CITY — To help ensure a viable future for Catholic education in Utah, the Diocese of Salt Lake City plans to consolidate the campuses of Judge Memorial Catholic High School and Our Lady of Lourdes and Kearns-St. Ann Elementary Schools on 14.4 acres of property she owns around St. Ann’s Catholic Church at 2119 South 400 East in South Salt Lake.

Utah Catholic Schools Superintendent Mark Longe announced that the diocese is considering selling the property of the current Judge Memorial/Our Lady of Lourdes campus in an Oct. 8 letter sent to the three school communities.

“A move of this magnitude would depend on the value of the property and the success of Justice Memorial’s fundraising campaign,” he wrote.

If the diocese goes through with the plan, students in kindergarten through fifth grade at Notre-Dame de Lourdes and Kearns-St. Ann’s elementary schools would be amalgamated and housed in the historic Kearns-St. Ann’s building. Grades six through eight would be part of the Académie Notre-Dame de Lourdes, which would have its own floor in a new building to be constructed for the high school.

The move would only be possible if the diocese is able to sell the 7.7-acre Judge/Our Lady of Lourdes site at a price sufficient to cover the construction of a new building on the land near Kearns-St. Anne Catholic School.

In an interview with the Intermountain Catholic, Longe pointed out that the diocese was at this point exploring the possibility of a move to the St. Ann campus. “We really don’t know how much money we can get for the land,” he said. “The Bishop has cleared the property for sale so we can see if we can find a buyer who will help us get closer to our target. This whole project is based on the fact that we can sell the land at an adequate price.

While Judge Memorial CHS principal Patrick Lambert expects enrollment to grow at a new campus, the main goal of the move is to retain existing students, he said. A 2019 demographic study sponsored by the diocese found that Catholic schools in Utah experience a lot of attrition between fifth and sixth grade. The main reason students left was because of programming; parents want more electives, more language opportunities and more course variety, Lambert said.

“We’re trying to meet that challenge by providing an enhanced college experience,” he said.

The move would also allow the school to expand its STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), computer coding and industrial arts programs, he said, adding that combining the schools on one campus would allow to pool resources, more specialized teachers and advanced course offerings.

The goal of the move would be to provide a better learning experience for all students, Lambert said.

The St. Ann campus is easily accessible by public transit, another benefit Lambert cites as very important. The new campus would also be energy efficient, while Judge’s buildings have aging issues: construction dates range from 1936 to 1989.

“Sometimes it’s been a pipe dream to be able to get into a place where our energy goals are very different,” Lambert said. “What we see now is that it’s time to modernize. There’s more of a sense of urgency in the sense that I don’t want to put this off so that someone 20 years from now has to deal with the current challenges of our facilities. Having a plan moving forward allows us to have an open and healthy school for the next 100 years.

If the financial side of the equation can work out, the move would allow the diocese to provide a full K-12 campus on the north side of the Salt Lake Valley, similar to the Skaggs Catholic Center in Draper, Longe said. “This will allow us to have two very strong education centers in the valley for the future.”

Moving the Judge Memorial campus is not a new idea. The possibility of moving to St. Ann’s property was first mooted in 1958, Lambert said. JMCHS failed in 1988 with an attempt to purchase South High School as it closed and again in 1995 with a bid for historic Jordan High School, which was closing. In the early 2000s, they also examined a property that is now the Granite School District campus in South Salt Lake.

Although all of these efforts proved unsuccessful, “every time it happened, it really revolved around the fact that Judge Memorial was on four and a half acres; most high schools are on 20 acres,” Lambert said.

The difference this time is that there is strong interest from buyers, local and national, in the Judge property, Lambert said. Additionally, discussions with the judging community have resulted in verbal commitments for significant additional funding, he said.

“Our community support is immense,” he said. “This construction is being received extremely positively. We are very optimistic that the Judge Memorial community is coming together to create the best learning environment for its future students.

The diocese has already put the property up for sale and the school’s fundraising campaign is expected to continue over the next two years. If funds are raised, the new buildings could be completed in three to four years, Lambert said.

If the move proves financially impossible, the school community will regroup and look at other options, Longe said.

“We would like to pursue the idea of ​​consolidating a K-12 model and if we had to do that locally, we would do a strategic planning process to do that,” he said. “We probably couldn’t afford to do it on the scale that we do now.

“We just want to stay on the cutting edge,” he added. “Judge is a four-time blue ribbon school. We want to be able to continue to maintain these programs and provide the best education for years to come for our students.

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Cardinal Mooney High School added an education option as Sarasota grew https://odessasem.com/cardinal-mooney-high-school-added-an-education-option-as-sarasota-grew/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 23:57:45 +0000 https://odessasem.com/cardinal-mooney-high-school-added-an-education-option-as-sarasota-grew/ The first idea that a new Catholic priest was in town to establish a mission church appeared in a nondescript advertisement announcing that Reverend Joseph Daley would begin offering Mass in a newly constructed modern Sarasota building at 4035 S. Tamiami Trail, two blocks east of Bee. Route of the crests. The modest announcement belied […]]]>

The first idea that a new Catholic priest was in town to establish a mission church appeared in a nondescript advertisement announcing that Reverend Joseph Daley would begin offering Mass in a newly constructed modern Sarasota building at 4035 S. Tamiami Trail, two blocks east of Bee. Route of the crests.

The modest announcement belied the important role Father Daley would soon play in Sarasota in general and the Catholic community in particular.

The Reverend Charles Elslander (who would rise to the rank of Monsignor) and his assistants had ministered to the needs of Catholics here since the establishment of St. Martha’s Parish in 1927. He was loved throughout the county by Catholics and non-Catholics alike, who considered him an important civic leader. Another clergyman said of him: “He was the man to whom all turned in times of trouble and sorrow and no one was turned away.

More Sarasota history:

Many of these St. Martha students would go on to attend and graduate from Cardinal Mooney.

In 1950, he spearheaded the establishment of St. Martha’s Parish School on Orange Avenue for children in kindergarten through 8th grade. Students in uniform learned the curriculum of the public school system, as well as daily religious lessons, as well as the discipline imposed by the nuns of the Order of St. Benedict.

The Catholic educational landscape changed in 1959 when Cardinal Mooney High School began accepting students. They were first taught at Bell Plaza, a strip of stores in downtown Sarasota. The newly established Church of the Incarnation was also commissioned for some classes.

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Best practices shared at directors meeting https://odessasem.com/best-practices-shared-at-directors-meeting/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/best-practices-shared-at-directors-meeting/ Principals, including Heather Crisci of Camden Catholic Secondary School and Philip Gianfortune of Paul VI Secondary School, attend the annual School Leadership Conference for Heads of South Jersey Catholic Schools on October 25 in Cape May. (Photos by Michael Bress) “Very small things can have a big impact,” said Fr. Robert Hughes, Vicar General and […]]]>

Principals, including Heather Crisci of Camden Catholic Secondary School and Philip Gianfortune of Paul VI Secondary School, attend the annual School Leadership Conference for Heads of South Jersey Catholic Schools on October 25 in Cape May. (Photos by Michael Bress)

“Very small things can have a big impact,” said Fr. Robert Hughes, Vicar General and Moderator of the Curia of the Diocese of Camden, during his homily at the opening mass of the annual leadership conference. schools for headmasters of Catholic schools in South Jersey, October 29. 25-26 at Cape May.

Using a reading from the Mustard Seed Gospel of Luke, he encouraged those present to continue to encourage their teachers, students and school families.

Principals of elementary and secondary schools from across the diocese gathered for the conference to connect with one another, reflect on the current school year, and participate in several professional development workshops. Those in charge of parish catechesis were also invited.

Father Robert Hughes, Vicar General and Moderator of the Curia of the Diocese of Camden, opens the conference.

The first day began with a workshop led by Father Hughes in which he commented on the National Catholic Revival that has been going on in the United States for two years now. He spoke about the history of the Eucharist and its importance in the Catholic Church. Along the same lines, he also presented a breakdown of the Last Supper and its connection to one’s life and the schools headed by principals.

The second day consisted of workshops for elementary schools, focusing on day-to-day operations, including academics, enrollment and government. Dr. Robert Lockwood, director of curriculum and assessment for the Diocesan Office of Catholic Schools, discussed teacher supervision and feedback, including information about the Charlotte Danielson teaching framework.

Marianela Nuñez, Director of Enrollment and Outreach, presented on recruitment and retention and the responsibility of directors and their enrollment teams to lead with vision. She included a “think and feel” visual audit activity, to help schools deliver an exceptional customer experience to new and current families.

Dr. William Watson, Superintendent of Catholic Schools, addresses the crowd.

The day ended with some updates from Sister Rose DiFluri, Assistant Superintendent of Catholic Schools, regarding upcoming funding deadlines as well as legislative updates currently affecting schools.

To learn more about South Jersey Catholic Schools, visit southjerseycatholicschools.org.

Michael Bress, communications and marketing manager for the diocesan Catholic Education Office, contributed to this report.

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Roanoke Catholic students learn about farming with a mobile dairy farm https://odessasem.com/roanoke-catholic-students-learn-about-farming-with-a-mobile-dairy-farm/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 14:05:23 +0000 https://odessasem.com/roanoke-catholic-students-learn-about-farming-with-a-mobile-dairy-farm/ ROANOKE, Va. – Bringing lessons from the farm directly to students is the goal of a mobile dairy classroom for schools across Virginia. He shines a light on the value of dairy and nutrition, with the help of a friend named Honey. The Mobile Dairy Class stopped at Roanoke Catholic School on Monday (10/24) to […]]]>

ROANOKE, Va. – Bringing lessons from the farm directly to students is the goal of a mobile dairy classroom for schools across Virginia. He shines a light on the value of dairy and nutrition, with the help of a friend named Honey.

The Mobile Dairy Class stopped at Roanoke Catholic School on Monday (10/24) to teach agriculture to elementary and high school students.

“We love to talk about all the hard work that goes into caring for these cows. Many people don’t realize all the different things that need to be considered and thought about. You know how much feed they need and everything,” said Morgan Cole, the mobile dairy class instructor.

During presentations, students line up in the parking lot in front of Honey, a traveling dairy cow who helps bring the process of dairy farming to life.

The Jersey cow is the second most popular cow to milk. It helps demonstrate how farmers milk their cows and how that milk gets from the grocery store to your table.

“I think my favorite part was when they showed us how they clean and milk the cows,” said 6th grader Ansley Tompkins.

“I think it was cool. It was very interesting and I want to see it again,” said Madison Galazka, a 2nd grader.

A typical week for each instructor is to travel with their cow to schools and events across the state to teach the importance of dairy farming. Also this week, Cole and Honey traveled to the Amherst County Fair, Roanoke Catholic and Northern Virginia. Cole will be teaching classes until the end of December.

The program is free for schools, fairs, festivals, libraries, camps and just about anywhere. In 2019, Mobile Dairy Classrooms presented to over 675,000 people.

Copyright 2022 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.

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Berks Catholic Football Falls at Cocalico https://odessasem.com/berks-catholic-football-falls-at-cocalico/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 08:29:02 +0000 https://odessasem.com/berks-catholic-football-falls-at-cocalico/ Berks Catholic was no match for Cocalico’s rushing attack on Friday night. The Saints allowed 306 rushing yards and four touchdowns, ultimately falling to the Eagles 31-10 in a Lancaster-Lebanon League Section 4 game at Forino Sports Complex. “They just did whatever they had to do,” Berks Catholic coach Rick Keeley said of Cocalico. “They […]]]>

Berks Catholic was no match for Cocalico’s rushing attack on Friday night.

The Saints allowed 306 rushing yards and four touchdowns, ultimately falling to the Eagles 31-10 in a Lancaster-Lebanon League Section 4 game at Forino Sports Complex.

“They just did whatever they had to do,” Berks Catholic coach Rick Keeley said of Cocalico. “They kept fighting, and they were the better team.”

The Eagles (4-2, 5-4) were led by junior running back Sam Steffey, who carried 42 times for 237 yards and three touchdowns. His longest run was 50 meters.

“He’s a workhorse,” Keeley said. “We knew we had to stop him if we wanted to win this game, and we couldn’t.”

Cocalico’s Samuel Steffey had a big night against Berks Catholic on Friday at Forino Sports Complex. (BILL UHRICH – READING EAGLE)

Steffey gave Cocalico an early lead in the first quarter, scoring on a 2-yard run to cap a 14-play drive.

Berks Catholic (3-3, 3-6) responded quickly, as Josiah “JayJay” Jordan scored on a 23-yard run to put the Saints on the board in the final minute of the first quarter. Jordan finished with 44 yards on 13 carries and also recorded an interception.

Josiah
Josiah “JayJay” Jordan runs 23 yards for a first-half touchdown against Cocalico on Friday at Forino Sports Complex. (BILL UHRICH – READING EAGLE)

The teams traded field goals in the second quarter. Cocalico’s Talen Popolis netted a 25-yard field goal to put the Eagles up 10-7. Berks Catholic kicker Andrew Kurtas netted a 22-yard field goal with 15 seconds left in the half to tie the game.

Berks Catholic's Andrew Kurtas throws a 22-yard field goal to tie the game late in the first half against Cocalico on Friday at Forino Sports Complex.  (BILL UHRICH - READING EAGLE)
Berks Catholic’s Andrew Kurtas throws a 22-yard field goal to tie the game late in the first half against Cocalico on Friday at Forino Sports Complex. (BILL UHRICH – READING EAGLE)

Cocalico dominated the second half, scoring 21 unanswered points. Steffey ran for a 4-yard touchdown late in the third quarter and a 5-yard touchdown early in the fourth quarter to make it 24-10.

“His line blocked really well for him,” Keeley said of Steffey. “He ran really hard behind his lineman.”

The Eagles’ final touchdown came with 1:17 to go, as running back Owen Weaver dove into the end zone from one yard out.

The Saints had just 89 total rushing yards and seven first downs. Aside from Jordan, Berks Catholic has only rushed for 13 yards on 15 carries.

“We didn’t do very well on the attacking side of the ball tonight,” Keeley said. “They played a very good defense against us.”

With the loss, the Saints are likely eliminated from the District 3 playoffs. Berks Catholic entered seventh in the Class 3A District 3 power rankings on Friday, with the top six teams advancing to the playoffs.

“We’ve lost to a lot of good teams this year,” Keeley said. “It wasn’t for lack of effort.”

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