Catholic school – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 16:15:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Catholic school – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 Charles City and Howard-Winneshiek among schools with new superintendents – KCHA News https://odessasem.com/charles-city-and-howard-winneshiek-among-schools-with-new-superintendents-kcha-news/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 16:15:02 +0000 https://odessasem.com/charles-city-and-howard-winneshiek-among-schools-with-new-superintendents-kcha-news/ The new school year began Friday (July 1) for schools in Iowa, and a number of northern Iowa school districts are starting the year with new leaders at the helm. In Charles City, Anne Lundquist takes over as acting superintendent. More recently, Lundquist was a teacher at Immaculate Conception Catholic School in Charles City, but […]]]>

The new school year began Friday (July 1) for schools in Iowa, and a number of northern Iowa school districts are starting the year with new leaders at the helm.

In Charles City, Anne Lundquist takes over as acting superintendent. More recently, Lundquist was a teacher at Immaculate Conception Catholic School in Charles City, but previously served as Superintendent of Schools in Red Lake, Minnesota and worked for the Minnesota Department of Education..

Lundquist has a one-year contract with the district, which will resume hiring a permanent superintendent later this year. She replaces Mike Fisher, who resigned after four years in Charles City to take up the same position in his hometown of Oskaloosa.

The Howard-Winneshiek School District‘s new superintendent also began his new job on Friday. Kris Einck, previously superintendent and high school principal of the South Winneshiek Community School District, succeeds Ted Ihns, who is now superintendent of Indianola Schools.

Decorah’s new superintendent also officially took over on Friday. Dr. Tim Cronin has served as a shared superintendent with the Central City and Dunkerton school districts for the past two years.

The Mason City School District begins the new school year with a new superintendent for the first time as Pat Hamilton takes over from serving as Director of Student Services for the Spencer School District.

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St. Patrick’s Day Fundraiser for St. Augustine Mission | Local News https://odessasem.com/st-patricks-day-fundraiser-for-st-augustine-mission-local-news/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/st-patricks-day-fundraiser-for-st-augustine-mission-local-news/ It will be like a homecoming for the Reverend Mark Beran. Years ago, Beran lived in Fremont and St. Patrick’s Catholic Church was his parish. Today, Beran is director of the St. Augustine Indian Mission in Winnebago. The mission is primarily a Catholic K-8 school serving reservation children from Omaha and Winnebago. Beran will return […]]]>

It will be like a homecoming for the Reverend Mark Beran.

Years ago, Beran lived in Fremont and St. Patrick’s Catholic Church was his parish.

Today, Beran is director of the St. Augustine Indian Mission in Winnebago. The mission is primarily a Catholic K-8 school serving reservation children from Omaha and Winnebago.

Beran will return for a visit to Fremont on Wednesday, July 13, when the church will hold a fundraiser for the mission. The event begins at 6 p.m. at Delaney Hall in the church at 3400 E. 16th St.

The public is invited to a meal and learn more about the mission. Tickets are $50 each and are available online at bit.ly/3aZ5V6J or by calling the parish office at 402-721-6611.

Beran said a young man will play a Native American flute at the event and a family may perform a dance. He said the Knights of Columbus group will be grilling steaks for the event.

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Funds raised will support St. Augustine’s Church and primarily the Catholic school, which is about an hour’s drive north of Fremont on US Highway 77.

“We try to be there and help people,” Beran said. “Reservations are still struggling with poverty and addictions and we want to share the goodness of Christ with people and we do that primarily through education. We also help with a food pantry and thrift store and other means – whatever we can do to uplift the people of the tribes and honor their culture.

Beran said around 110 boys and girls, aged 5 to 13, attend the school.

He hopes local and area residents will attend the fundraiser.

“It’s a great way for people in Fremont to experience the Native American culture that’s right here in Nebraska and to bring us all together in faith,” Beran said.

Beran expressed his gratitude for St. Patrick’s, which he said is hosting the event.

“It was really their idea,” Beran said. “They wanted to bring people together, so I’m really grateful to Father (Walter) Nolte and all the staff and people at St. Patrick,” Beran said.

St. Patrick’s assistant office manager Crystal Sixta cites the thoughts behind the event.

“The Archdiocese of Omaha strives to be missionary, focusing outside of the needs of our own parish,” Sixta said. “We hope this evening will be a success in helping St. Augustine not only maintain its religious education, but also preserve the Winnebago language and culture.”

Mother Katherine Drexel founded St. Augustine Indian Mission School in 1909. She died in 1955. In 2000, Pope John Paul II canonized Blessed Katharine Drexel, now Saint Katharine Drexel.

The school has continued to teach and encourage students over the years. Its website states, “Our school provides a nurturing, faith-filled educational experience that serves as the foundation for a life lived in service to Jesus, the church, and the community.”

Beran’s connection to Fremont began years ago.

Her family moved from Los Angeles to Fremont in 1993, weeks after graduating from high school.

“The parish has always been a great prayer support for me from my days in the seminary to the last 20 years as a priest, they have prayed for me and supported me along the way and I have always appreciated that,” Beran said.

Beran is looking forward to the event, adding:

“St. Patrick is my home church and so it’s nice to have that connection to my home church and to bring people from different cultures together and get to know and understand each other better.

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Santo Niño manager and three others charged with obstructing child abuse report https://odessasem.com/santo-nino-manager-and-three-others-charged-with-obstructing-child-abuse-report/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 03:48:03 +0000 https://odessasem.com/santo-nino-manager-and-three-others-charged-with-obstructing-child-abuse-report/ June 28 – Santo Niño Regional Catholic School principal Robin Chavez, who faced calls for her ousting by parents for dealing with a sexual abuse allegation against a former employee in 2021, makes now facing a misdemeanor charge of obstructing a report of child abuse or neglect. Three other people are charged with the same […]]]>

June 28 – Santo Niño Regional Catholic School principal Robin Chavez, who faced calls for her ousting by parents for dealing with a sexual abuse allegation against a former employee in 2021, makes now facing a misdemeanor charge of obstructing a report of child abuse or neglect.

Three other people are charged with the same charge: school employee Maida Esquibel, Archdiocese of Santa Fe superintendent Susan Murphy and victim assistance and environment coordinator Annette Klimka. sure of the Archdiocese.

New Mexico State Police originally filed the charges, which carry up to 364 days in jail, in March in Santa Fe County Trial Court. A report says police suspect the women knew of an alleged April 2021 incident involving former school health assistant Robert Apodaca and a 9-year-old boy, but did not report it to law enforcement or child protective services authorities of State. Chavez said she placed Apodaca on leave following the incident and he quit soon after.

The district attorney’s office dismissed the charges in trial court late last month, according to court records, and refiled them Monday in state district court.

Misdemeanors are usually prosecuted in lower court, but District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies said in a statement Tuesday that she transferred the cases to district court because she wanted to prosecute them in a court of record. .

Officials from the local Catholic school and the archdiocese did not respond to requests for comment on Tuesday.

A state police report into the investigation into Apodaca’s conduct in Santo Niño was released in September, months after he was charged in an unrelated boy assault case. at the Gonzales Community School. This sparked outrage from some parents of Santo Niño, who said Chavez did not inform them of the criminal investigation into the orderly in April 2021 or even after Apodaca’s arrest in July 2021.

He has since been charged with assaulting the boy Santo Niño, as well as another child and teenager. He is being held without bail at the Santa Fe County Jail pending trial.

His attorney did not return a call seeking comment.

Chavez’s attorney, Dan Cron, called the accusation against his client a “senseless lawsuit” during an interview on Tuesday. He said the principal was innocent and that he intended to file a motion to dismiss her case.

“What was reported to him was that a child was sitting on [Apodaca’s] knees in the presence of other children,” Cron said. “No allegations have been reported to [Chavez] that any sexual contact or child abuse had taken place. Although it was against school policy, the report did not constitute a crime, otherwise she would have reported it immediately.”

The principal immediately put Apodaca on leave, Cron said, and the orderly quit before the school could go through the process of firing him.

Tom Clark, an attorney for Murphy, said he was eager to defend her against the charge and was sure it would be vindicated.

Klimka’s attorney, Todd Wertheim, declined to comment.

Esquibel’s attorney, Kitren Fischer, wrote in an email: “Ms. Esquibel saw a child sitting on Mr. Apodaca’s lap late in the afternoon. Ms. Esquibel did not witness any no abuse, but what she saw still reported it to her supervisor the next business day Ms. Esquibel never failed to report child abuse, nor stood in the way of a child abuse investigation.

This conflicts with a probable cause statement filed by State Police Officer Eric Jackson, who said Esquibel reported the April 23, 2021 incident three days later on April 26.

Jackson’s report says he attended the child’s home on April 28 in response to a report from a woman of possible sexual contact with a minor. He interviewed the Santo Niño boy’s mother, who said Chavez spoke to him that day about Esquibel’s concerns about the April 23 incident, in which she walked into a darkened room where several children were watching a movie and had seen the boy sitting on Apodaca. round.

The officer then went to the school and spoke with Chavez, who told him that Esquibel had reported the incident on April 26, he wrote in his report. Chavez contacted Murphy, who told him to speak to Klimka about the incident. Neither woman had contacted law enforcement, he wrote.

“Chavez said when she spoke to Murphy…Murphy said to wait because the situation hadn’t reached the level of reporting to law enforcement or the Department of Children, Youth and Families of New -Mexico,” the officer wrote.

He added, “Chavez said she never reported the incident to law enforcement…because she was ‘nervous’ and wanted the Archdiocese to help her report it.”

The boy said in a forensic interviewer on April 29 that Apodaca would give him ‘lollipops’ and rub and hug him in a way that made him uncomfortable, according to the probable cause statement. .

The officer wrote that he interviewed Klimka and Murphy in October. Klimka said Murphy told her about the incident and that she and Chavez decided that Klimka would investigate further before contacting law enforcement.

“[Klimka] said it was ‘reasonable’ for a child to sit on a school employee’s lap because there were other children around,” the officer said. But, a- he added, she said it was “a lack of judgment” on their part not to contact the law enforcement immediately.

Murphy told Jackson she did not recall telling Chavez that the incident was not worth reporting, Jackson wrote.

However, while reviewing the contents of Chavez’s iPad in January, the officer wrote that he found confirmation that Murphy told Chavez on April 28 that the incident did not appear serious enough to report.

He also found a note in which Klimka said she did not believe it was a child endangerment issue, according to her report.

“Based on the evidence collected from the iPad, this proves that Klimka, Chavez and Murphy lied about the decision not to report,” the officer wrote.

“Eu [the boy’s] mother did not contact law enforcement herself,” he added, “the incident would have remained undocumented and the sexual abuse allegations would not have been investigated. further investigation”.

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Allentown Central Catholic returns through heat to win big school championship at Cedar Beach Basketball Showcase – The Morning Call https://odessasem.com/allentown-central-catholic-returns-through-heat-to-win-big-school-championship-at-cedar-beach-basketball-showcase-the-morning-call/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 11:37:30 +0000 https://odessasem.com/allentown-central-catholic-returns-through-heat-to-win-big-school-championship-at-cedar-beach-basketball-showcase-the-morning-call/ Allentown Central Catholic played at 10 a.m. Sunday and lost to Muhlenberg Township. That meant the Vikings’ path to the championship game at the 26th Annual Cedar Beach Basketball Showcase had to go through a long, scorching day with a few dips in Little Lehigh Creek in between. Players stepped into cool water between competitions […]]]>

Allentown Central Catholic played at 10 a.m. Sunday and lost to Muhlenberg Township.

That meant the Vikings’ path to the championship game at the 26th Annual Cedar Beach Basketball Showcase had to go through a long, scorching day with a few dips in Little Lehigh Creek in between.

Players stepped into cool water between competitions and it provided just enough refreshment to keep the Vikings strong. They ended the day 11 hours after starting with a 34-29 win over Township Muhlenberg in the title match that concluded the four-day 55-team tournament which featured teams from three different tiers from across the region.

The championship was Central’s first since 2005, when the tournament was called the Stellar Construction “Catch A Rising Star” Showcase.

Whatever the name, it was an impressive performance for the Vikings who are coming off a 21-6 season that featured a disappointing end with Eastern Conference tournament semifinal losses from Pennsylvania and from District 11 4A and a first round loss in the PIAA. playoffs

Sophomore Jahrel Vigo was the MVP and Nico Pulieri was the sixth recipient of the award.

But typical of the depth and scoring balance used by ACCHS to pull off their Super Sunday, Vigo only scored in the Championship, none in the second half of yet another win from behind on a matchday full of them by the Vikings.

David Fridia scored four points in the second half and had a team-best eight in the title game. Anthony Jones and Cole Cook scored three goals apiece for Central in the second half when they had just 15 points and just two field goals.

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Thanks to a solid defensive effort, it was enough to beat a Muhlenberg Township team that is undefeated in the Lehigh Valley Varsity Summer League and was undefeated in the tournament until the last game.

“What a day,” said CCHS assistant coach Kevin Keeler, who was the main voice on the bench throughout the weekend. “In every game, we are fighting for our lives. We trailed by five or ten points at halftime and won games by two or four. We are lucky to be deep because Jahrel was our MVP and he basically couldn’t run because he had cramps. We had another guy who had cramps. It shows our depth and pride in these guys.

Soon to be sophomore nTommy Lloyd, son of former Whitehall star Jerry Lloyd, scored 13 points and was named MVP as the Zephyrs won the JV tournament with a 47-36 victory over Emmaus in the match of championship contested Sunday evening at Cedar Plage.

Whitehall, whose varsity team went 7-15 last year, has shown signs of improvement throughout the offseason and the JV title means a slight uptick. The Zephyrs won five games in total and beat Allentown Central Catholic 59-19 at the start of the day and edged Whitehall 43-40 at the start of the afternoon, then won the rematch more decisively in the game for the title.

“It’s a great group of kids with great families,” JV coach Erik Dogmanits said. “It’s a team. It reminds me of the old days of Whitehall where everyone played rough and they got together and they were scrappy. We preach the tradition of Whitehall and I’m really proud of them for coming out and winning this thing. We are opening gyms open and lifting tomorrow and that should give them a boost. I always say to reach the highest level as fast as possible. Work your cock and that’s what these guys do. They worked extremely hard in this tournament and I’m proud of them.

More story to come.

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VIDAL Access aims to level the playing field around college acceptance https://odessasem.com/vidal-access-aims-to-level-the-playing-field-around-college-acceptance/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 07:56:54 +0000 https://odessasem.com/vidal-access-aims-to-level-the-playing-field-around-college-acceptance/ “A child is a child.” This is the philosophy of VIDAL Access, a non-profit college access organization that provides school-based counseling services to primarily low-income students. VIDAL Access recently announced that they have helped two students from Birmingham gain acceptance into Ivy League schools. Jose Tallaj, a student at John Carroll Catholic High School, was […]]]>

“A child is a child.”

This is the philosophy of VIDAL Access, a non-profit college access organization that provides school-based counseling services to primarily low-income students.

VIDAL Access recently announced that they have helped two students from Birmingham gain acceptance into Ivy League schools. Jose Tallaj, a student at John Carroll Catholic High School, was accepted to Columbia University, and Kennedy Tyson, a student at Indian Springs School, was accepted to Brown University.

The non-profit organization is “pushing” college consultants into Birmingham-area high schools to provide students with writing support, SAT and ACT prep, and resume writing and writing help, among other services.

“Our method of ‘push’ in schools is a reflection of our values,” said Lance Beverly, president and CEO of VIDAL Access. “We’re not trying to pick the top five kids from Ramsay High School, the top three kids from Woodlawn, the top three kids from John Carroll who fall into this ‘diverse bucket of students.’ We have this full-fledged model of “pushing” into schools because every child matters.

The US Department of Education reports that students only receive 38 minutes of college counseling per year, Beverely said, stemming from the overwhelming workloads and responsibilities of school counselors.

School counselors across the country have many responsibilities such as coordinating tests, conducting surveys, social and emotional development and lesson planning, Beverly said, which means only 22% of their time can be devoted to duties related to the university council, according to the College. Plank.

The American School Counseling Association recommends a ratio of 250 students to 1 counselor, but the national average is 480 to 1 and in Alabama that number is 450 students to every counselor, he said.

“When only about a fifth of your time can be spent on college counseling and you have 450 students under your care, it’s no wonder the US national average is 38 minutes of college counseling per year in high school,” says Beverly.

Beverly designates Birmingham High Schools as the main “offices” of VIDAL Access. VIDAL Access places academic consultants in schools for 8 hours because it believes it should not be the responsibility of students to contact them, he said.

“Our aim is to provide low-income, lower-middle-class students with the same level of academic counseling support that a wealthy family would seek in the private market, but we provide this on-site at the school,” said Beverly said. . “The thing is, most of the students we serve come from a single parent home where mom has a few jobs or maybe you have two siblings to take care of.”

Beverly has had a passion for college access work since she was 13, he said. When his grandmother died after graduating from college at age 28, it encouraged him to pursue his lifelong passion for college access work, Beverly said.

“It’s as simple as that: a child is a child,” Beverly said. “We see the kid, we help the kid. That’s why we partner with a devout Catholic school, and that’s why we partner with an LGBTQ school, because a child is a child.

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HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding Awa – GuruFocus.com https://odessasem.com/hiis-ingalls-shipbuilding-awa-gurufocus-com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:16:58 +0000 https://odessasem.com/hiis-ingalls-shipbuilding-awa-gurufocus-com/ PASCAGOULA, Mississippi, May 23, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — HII (:HII), an all-round defense and technology partner, today announced that the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division has awarded $100,000 in grants to 25 STEM-related initiatives from schools and educational organizations in Mississippi and Alabama. Ingalls has awarded more than $1.1 million for science, technology, engineering and math […]]]>

PASCAGOULA, Mississippi, May 23, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — HII (:HII), an all-round defense and technology partner, today announced that the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division has awarded $100,000 in grants to 25 STEM-related initiatives from schools and educational organizations in Mississippi and Alabama. Ingalls has awarded more than $1.1 million for science, technology, engineering and math projects over the past decade.

“Establishing a strong awareness and interest in STEM is essential to the development of our next generation of shipbuilders,” said Kari Wilkinson, President of Ingalls Shipbuilding. “As a committed partner in education, we recognize the importance of providing the resources educators need to create and grow their STEM programs, while giving young Americans access to high-level learning opportunities. quality.”

“Ingalls gave my students the opportunity to further their education in computer science, and the STEM grant allowed us to purchase a set of high-tech robots for one of our classrooms,” said Keating Helms, a teacher at Bayou View Middle School in Gulfport. “This award has given our STEM program a huge boost.”

HII has made many investments in STEM education programs over the years. Through partnerships with local high schools, community colleges and technical schools, summer internships and state-of-the-art apprenticeship schools at the company’s two shipyards, HII is committed to shaping the future of engineering, science and technology.

A downloadable photo accompanying this press release is available at: https://newsroom.hii.com/releases/ingalls-shipbuilding-stem-grants.

Ingalls Shipbuilding 2021 STEM Grant Recipients:

Alma Bryant High School (Irvington, Alabama): Students will learn about the design, testing, installation and maintenance of sustainable food production technology. $3,756

Anniston Avenue Elementary (Gulfport, Mississippi): Students will learn the basics of robotics and engineering using LEGO Education Spike sets. $4,919

Bayou View Middle School (Gulfport, Mississippi): Students will learn coding and engineering principles using iRobot kits and materials. $4,121

Christ the King Catholic School (Daphne, Ala.): Students will learn engineering skills while building remotely operated underwater vehicles. $4,971

Crossroads Elementary (Gulfport, Mississippi): Students will use STEM kits to create imaginative videos to share concepts with younger students. $2,770

East Central Middle School (Moss Point, Miss.): Students will use VEX IQ robot kits to learn the basic principles of robotics. $4,898

Fairhope East Elementary (Fairhope, Alabama): Students will learn the basics of coding and robotics through hands-on activities. $5,000

Fairhope High School (Fairhope, Alabama): Students will participate in the NASA Rover Challenge. $1,820

Kreole Elementary School (Moss Point, Mississippi): Younger students will use hands-on engagement as an early introduction to STEM concepts. $5,000

Moss Point Vocational and Technical Training Center (Moss Point, Mississippi): Students will build remote-controlled underwater vehicles. $5,000

MS Gulf Coast YMCA (Miss. Gulf Coast): Students will build a model of a MARS helicopter and space lava lamp. $5,000

Murphy High School (Mobile, Alabama): Students will build raised beds to study plant life cycles and soil chemistry. $5,000

North Gulfport Elementary and Middle School (Gulfport, Mississippi): Students will learn how to create video games using STEM concepts. $810

Pascagoula High School (Pascagoula, Mississippi): Students will build an autonomous irrigation system for school gardens. $2,430

Pascagoula High School (Pascagoula, Mississippi): Students will use lab kits and technology to learn science concepts in a virtual environment. $4,830

Pass Christian High School (Pass Christian, Miss.): Students will build a greenhouse and learn about horticulture and environmental impacts. $4,941

Pass Christian Middle School (Pass Christian, Miss.): Students will design and build a drone delivery system. $4,700

Resurrection Catholic College (Pascagoula, Mississippi): Students will use VEX kits for robotics studies. $4,771

St. Martin High School (Ocean Springs, Mississippi): Students will use an air press system to build laminated skateboards. $4,997

St. Mary’s Catholic School (Mobile, Alabama): Pre-K students will use Bee Bot bundles to learn the basics of coding. $4,998

Stone County High School (Wiggins, Mississippi): Students will use plasma cutters to learn welding trades and create art projects. $3,830

Walter Anderson Museum of Art (Ocean Springs, Mississippi): The organization will host artist-educators and visiting metal artists to lead STEM design and large-scale steel sculpture design workshops with high school students at the school district‘s College and Career Technical Institute. Pascagoula-Gautier. $4,136

West Hancock Elementary (Hancock, Mississippi): Students will learn the concepts of force and motion using hands-on activities. $1,300

West Harrison Middle School (Gulfport, Mississippi): Students will use lab kits, microcontrollers, and a licensed program to learn design and coding. $4,500

West Wortham Elementary and High School (Saucier, Mississippi): Students will plan a 30-day simulated space mission using coding and wiring skills. $1,500.

HII is an all-round defense and technology partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing America’s national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and resilient warships ever built to unmanned systems, ISR and AI analytics. /ML. HII is the industry leader in mission-driven solutions that support and enable strength in all areas. Based in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce numbers 44,000. For more information visit:

Contact:
Kimberly K. Aguillard
[email protected]
(228) 355-5663

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/6c9ee0a9-e971-4040-af61-37559aa27923

Huntington-Ingalls-Industries-.png

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New head of Office of Black Catholic Ministries brings social justice experience https://odessasem.com/new-head-of-office-of-black-catholic-ministries-brings-social-justice-experience/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:10:41 +0000 https://odessasem.com/new-head-of-office-of-black-catholic-ministries-brings-social-justice-experience/ Click play below to listen to a radio interview with Adrienne Curry. The story follows As Adrienne Curry prepares to take on a new role as director of the Office of Black Catholic Ministries for the Archdiocese of Baltimore, she hopes to apply her vast background in the social justice movement and pastoral experience to […]]]>

Click play below to listen to a radio interview with Adrienne Curry. The story follows

As Adrienne Curry prepares to take on a new role as director of the Office of Black Catholic Ministries for the Archdiocese of Baltimore, she hopes to apply her vast background in the social justice movement and pastoral experience to support the Black Catholic community in Maryland.

“The bishops have said that racism is a sin and it is an affront to the dignity of the human person,” said Curry, a Chicago native who recently served as director of social action for the diocese. of Youngstown, Ohio,” but, as they say, Catholic Social Teaching is our best kept secret. So part of my job will be to educate people on the principles of Catholic Social Teaching and apply them in the everyday life, so definitely eradicating racism is part of that.

For the past year, Curry has been working on his doctoral dissertation at Lexington Theological Seminary in Kentucky, studying anti-racism in the Diocese of Youngstown. She begins her new role in Baltimore on July 5, taking over from Sherita Thomas, the office’s acting director.

Announcing the appointment June 17, Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori said Curry will “advocate for the needs and concerns of the black Catholic community and work to strengthen the efforts of local parishes to remove barriers to evangelism, especially the barriers of racial prejudice”.

The Archbishop said Curry will be a member of the Archdiocese’s Racial Justice Journey Coordinating Council and will help implement his call for racial justice which was discussed in his two pastoral letters, “The Enduring Power of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Principles of Nonviolence” and “The Journey to Racial Justice: Repentance, Healing, and Action.”

Curry has held various positions in the Archdiocese of Chicago, including program director for Catholic Relief Services, the American bishop’s international relief agency based in Baltimore. She worked in Lexington as a pastoral associate for parish social ministry. In Youngstown, his responsibilities included overseeing programs for the Diocesan Office of Social Action and managing grants for the Catholic Campaign for Human Development.

Curry told the Catholic Review she was thrilled to come to an archdiocese considered the birthplace of black Catholicism in the United States. She loves the rich history of Black Catholics and hopes to raise awareness throughout the Catholic Church of the contributions of Black Catholics.

It is essential that black voices are heard in the Catholic Church, Curry said, and that the community is represented at all levels.

“It’s very important that people of color be at the table at the outset — not after the fact, not after things have been decided,” she said. “We need to be there from the start so we can help set the tone and be part of the agenda.”

Curry said she is encouraged that the Archdiocese of Baltimore has made racial justice a priority and that activities such as parish racial justice circles are already making progress in promoting cross-cultural understanding.

“You have to meet people where they are,” she said, “and you have to see people as people. We all have things in common. »

Curry said she hopes parishes will build on the evangelism work already underway to make their faith communities as welcoming as possible.

“There are a lot of people who are not religious,” she said. “So go out and meet and greet people. Host a youth basketball night or something. Do something to invite people in.

Curry, who holds a master’s degree in theology from the Catholic Theological Union of Chicago, said she plans to spend a lot of time visiting many parishes in the archdiocese and does not initially plan to enroll. in one parish.

“I want to meet people and talk to pastors,” she says. “It’s important to me to hear what people need and want before I do anything else.”

Email George Matysek at gmatysek@CatholicReview.org

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The ordination of five priests is a moment of “incredible joy” for the Archdiocese of Baltimore https://odessasem.com/the-ordination-of-five-priests-is-a-moment-of-incredible-joy-for-the-archdiocese-of-baltimore/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 22:52:53 +0000 https://odessasem.com/the-ordination-of-five-priests-is-a-moment-of-incredible-joy-for-the-archdiocese-of-baltimore/ Newly ordained priests for the Archdiocese of Baltimore are all smiles at the end of their June 18, 2022 Ordination Mass at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Homeland. (Kevin J. Parks/CR Staff) As five newly ordained priests slowly walked down the long central aisle of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen at the […]]]>
Newly ordained priests for the Archdiocese of Baltimore are all smiles at the end of their June 18, 2022 Ordination Mass at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Homeland. (Kevin J. Parks/CR Staff)

As five newly ordained priests slowly walked down the long central aisle of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen at the end of their June 18 ordination mass, it was only fitting that many who filled the Cathedral of the Fatherland greeted them with a chorus of high trills. .

Three of the new priests are from the West African nation of Cameroon, where vocal ululations are commonly used to express unfettered joy.

This emotion was evident on the faces of the people who clapped, waved above their heads and cheered the newly ordained priests as they passed. It was also evident in the beaming faces of the clerics themselves.

Father Maurice Sunde Afor, from Nkambe, Cameroon, described the ordination as a moment of great joy. Even after spending 13 years in seminary — in Africa, Rome, and St. Mary’s Seminary at Roland Park — he said his long-awaited day came as a “surprise.”

Some of the 2,000 people present at the June 18, 2022 ordination mass at Notre-Dame de la Patrie Cathedral wore traditional African clothing. (Kevin J. Parks/CR Staff)

“It finally happened,” said Father Sunde Afor, standing in the shrine after his ordination as people thronged for him to take pictures. “I thank God and I thank all the people who have come here for me, praying for me. From this day on, I want to be with people and pray for them.

Father Peter Kiamo-oh and Father Kenneth N. Lukong were the other Cameroonians to receive the Sacrament of Orders. Americans ordained to the priesthood understand Father James Bors and Father David CF Ray.

Archbishop William E. Lori led the two-and-a-half-hour ordination liturgy. He was joined by Bishop George Nkou of Kumbo Diocese in Cameroon; Auxiliary Bishops of Baltimore Adam Parker and Bruce Lewandowski, C.Ss.R., and retired Bishop of Baltimore Denis J. Madden.

Dozens of seminarians were present for the celebration, as well as more than 25 deacons and more than 90 priests.

Fr Kenneth Lukong, from right, Fr Peter Kiamo-oh, Fr Maurice Sunde Afor, Fr David CF Ray and Fr James Bors concelebrate Mass after their ordination to the priesthood by Archbishop William E Lori at the Cathedral by Mary Our Queen in Homeland on June 18, 2022. (Kevin J. Parks/CR Staff)

Since 2016, the Archdiocese of Baltimore has collaborated with the Catholic Church in Cameroon to welcome seminarians to the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

In his homily, Bishop Lori greeted some 2,000 people and caused laughter when he jokingly referred to Bishop Nkou as a “donor bishop”. The Archbishop reiterated that the celebration of ordination was a day of joy for the whole Archdiocese “from stem to stern.” He noted that with a significant number of men expected to be ordained in the coming years, there would soon be 20 new priests serving the archdiocese.

“Such a thing has not happened here in decades,” Bishop Lori said, adding that next year he expects 60 seminarians to be in training to become priests for the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

“The ordination of more priests means that new doors of evangelization will open as young priests begin to serve in parishes and in ministries hitherto not filled by priests, such as high school chaplaincies and campus ministry,” Bishop Lori said, urging the congregation to stay. vigilant in prayer for more vocations.

Addressing the men he was to ordain, the Archbishop said they were ordained for holiness and for mission.

During their priestly ordination on June 18, 2022 at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen of the Fatherland, five men are prostrate in the sanctuary. (Kevin J. Parks/CR Staff)

“You are ordained not only to preserve the status quo,” he told them, “but rather to bring new energy, new joy, new gifts of the Spirit to the mission of evangelism in the Archdiocese of Baltimore”.

During the ordination rite, candidates for the priesthood prostrated themselves in the sanctuary while the congregation solemnly sang the litany of the saints.

Archbishop Lori placed his hands on their heads as he silently bestowed the gift of the Holy Spirit – a gesture that was repeated by the many priests present. The new priests were then clothed in stoles and chasubles before the archbishop anointed their hands and presented each with a paten and chalice.

One by one, the priests of the archdiocese joined the archbishop and the other bishops in giving the new priests a fraternal kiss.

Use the navigation arrows on the photo gallery below to see more photos. The story continues under the gallery.

Father Bors, a retired naval officer and longtime parishioner of St. Andrew by the Bay in Annapolis, said he dedicated his priesthood to his late wife, Shirley. His priestly ordination took place on the anniversary of his baptism.

“All I have is a gift – my whole life is a gift,” he told the Catholic Review. “My calling to marriage was a gift and now my calling to the priesthood and people of God is a beautiful gift, and I just pray that I can faithfully fulfill the responsibilities the Lord has given me.”

Jeffery Bors, father Bors’ youngest son, said he was happy for his father.

“When he told us that was what he wanted to do after my mother died, I was happy he found what he was called to do and I’m proud of him,” Jeffery Bors said. .

Father James Bors places his hands in those of Archbishop William E. Lori during the June 18, 2022 Priest Ordination Mass at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Homeland. (Kevin J. Parks/CR Staff)

Bors said his father had “a lot of initiative”.

“Wherever he goes, he always starts Bible studies and tries to bring people into the church and make people feel at home,” Jeffery Bors said.

Gladys Muma stood in line to receive a priestly blessing from Father Lukong. She has known the fellow Cameroonian since he was a teenager.

“I am so overwhelmed and so happy to receive a blessing from a newly appointed priest,” she said with a smile.

George Venyelle, from Cameroon whose wife is a cousin of Father Kiamo-oh, wore a striking emerald green African outfit and cattle horn necklace for the special day. Moments before receiving a blessing from Father Kiamo-oh, Venyelle smiled as she noted that the new priest’s touch “could uplift my spirit.”

After his ordination, Father Ray said he was grateful to be called to ministry. The laying on of hands by the Archbishop was a highlight, he said.

“It’s the tradition of the days of the apostles,” says Father Ray. “They laid hands on people to continue their ministry. It was special to know that I was part of this incredible legacy.

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Click on here to watch a recorded live broadcast of the ordination.

Email George Matysek at gmatysek@CatholicReview.org

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Doing nothing is not an option https://odessasem.com/doing-nothing-is-not-an-option/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 08:14:01 +0000 https://odessasem.com/doing-nothing-is-not-an-option/ The year after graduating from college, I completed a year of service through Volunteers for Educational and Social Services, or VESS, an organization of the Catholic Conference of Texas. VESS, founded in 1972, has placed young adults in economically underfunded parishes, schools, and social service agencies across Texas, though most volunteers are non-Texans. In fact, […]]]>

The year after graduating from college, I completed a year of service through Volunteers for Educational and Social Services, or VESS, an organization of the Catholic Conference of Texas. VESS, founded in 1972, has placed young adults in economically underfunded parishes, schools, and social service agencies across Texas, though most volunteers are non-Texans. In fact, in my cohort of volunteers, I was the only Texan. Unfortunately, due to lack of funding and declining volunteer registrations, the Educational and Social Services Volunteers ceased operations in 2001.

I lived in the community with four other women who were also recent college graduates and we worked at a small Catholic elementary school in a small town in Texas that none of us had heard of before. Needless to say, we learned a lot while serving at Sacred Heart Catholic School that year. Only one person in my community had studied education in college. The rest of us were distraught – good hearted, but distraught.

We learned from each other the importance of laughter, shared tears and mutual support through difficulties. We learned from the faculty community who embraced us and showed us compassion, a listening ear, and advice on how to be in the classroom. We learned from the students, from whom we received many hugs, saw flashes of understanding light up and we listened. It was a year that changed my life. It’s a place I could never forget and will always hold a place in my heart.

Unfortunately, after last month, no one will ever forget the city. Before last month, when I thought of Uvalde, I remembered the smiles of our students. Dance parties in our community house on cleaning days. The kindness of families who have given so much with so little. The quinceañera celebrations that lasted into the night. Now those memories are mingled with deep sadness and an undercurrent of rage as I consider how this small town has been changed forever.

I believe that this tragedy, along with the horrors of other recent mass shootings, has changed us all, whether we recognize it or not. I was in San Antonio a few weeks ago and chatted after mass with a young woman who will be starting her first year of teaching in August. She shared with me her main concern as she prepares for this new chapter. His main concern is that his class is not well designed to protect children from an active shooter. This is his main concern. No lesson plans or curricula. Not classroom management or discipline. But keeping his students safe from active shooter.

I’ve noticed that for the past few years when I’m out in public, I look around and I’m hyper-aware. Either I’m looking for a place to go or I’m trying to come up with an action/escape plan in case there’s a shootout. I do it in churches, at school, in crowded streets, restaurants, almost everywhere. I wouldn’t say I live in fear or dwell on safety plans. But I also try not to be naive about the possibilities.

And I wonder – what can we do with our collective trauma?

I don’t have many answers. But I know it. Doing nothing is not an option. We have to do something. Because it is by doing something that allows us to embody hope. If we give up and say we can’t do anything, we end up feeling defeated. And this feeling can lead to despair. And despair does not lead to change. It’s a self-perpetuating feedback loop of dead ends.

At times like this, I remember our foundress, Blessed Mother Adèle de Batz de Trenquelléon, who wrote: “Let us therefore courageously set to work, not allowing ourselves to be frightened by the magnitude of the task. just think about what we’re doing right now, doing it well. …” Courage! We need courage.

As we continue to deal with the traumatic events happening around us, let us never forget the victims. May their lives inspire us with the courage to act. We must.

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Louise C. Schmeling | Ozaukee Press https://odessasem.com/louise-c-schmeling-ozaukee-press/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:28:34 +0000 https://odessasem.com/louise-c-schmeling-ozaukee-press/ Louise Schmeling of Cedarburg, formerly of Fredonia and Belgium, died unexpectedly on Saturday, June 4, 2022, after knee surgery at Ascension Columbia-St. Mary’s Ozaukee Hospital in Mequon. She was 83 years old. Louise was born in 1939 in Milwaukee, the daughter of new immigrants Joseph and Mary Plum (née Ortmanns). One of five siblings, she […]]]>

Louise Schmeling of Cedarburg, formerly of Fredonia and Belgium, died unexpectedly on Saturday, June 4, 2022, after knee surgery at Ascension Columbia-St. Mary’s Ozaukee Hospital in Mequon. She was 83 years old.

Louise was born in 1939 in Milwaukee, the daughter of new immigrants Joseph and Mary Plum (née Ortmanns).

One of five siblings, she grew up in Milwaukee and graduated from Messmer High School in 1957.

In 1958, she married classmate James A. Schmeling of Milwaukee. She spoke German at home until she started dating Jim. They spent their entire life together and raised five children.

The family lived in Shorewood before moving to Ozaukee County in 1970. They were pioneers, decades before the move to suburbia. Their property included several acres where children enjoyed outdoor adventures. They kept chickens and ducks and had two Shetland ponies, which pulled a surrey with a fringe on top and a sled.

After six years in Belgium, they moved to Fredonia, where they lived for 42 years before Jim and Louise moved to Cedarburg in 2018.

Louise, a city girl, loved the rural setting of their Fredonia home near the Milwaukee River, which she swam in as a young girl on vacation.

Jim and Louise worked hard to send all of their children to Messmer High School in Milwaukee, where they received a rigorous education instilled in Christian values. They pursued parental choice in education before it had a name.

For 56 years, Louise served as the Avon First Lady of North Ozaukee County. Even though times have changed, she worked for the famous old-fashioned cosmetics company, meeting clients and befriending many. She continued to sell Avon until her death.

Louise and Jim, a retired meat cutter, also ran a property renovation and rental business in Milwaukee. Louise kept the books while Jim managed the properties. They are dedicated to providing decent housing at reasonable prices to people who otherwise might not have found it.

Louise was very proud to see her children grow up to become a registered nurse, electrician, financial manager, lobbyist and police officer.

Members of the extended Plum and Schmeling families primarily settled in Wisconsin, and their holiday gatherings were always full of laughter, fun and affection. And Avon.

Together with her husband, Louise is survived by four children, Chuck (Jenny) of Theresa, Patricia (Dave) Jaffke of Grafton, Sharon (James) Schmeling Kates of Jefferson and Eric of Grafton; seven grandchildren, Andy, Ben, Patryck, Tess, Maggie, Lucy and Lukas; and two great-granddaughters.

Louise is also survived by three siblings, Sr. Helen Plum, SSND, Henry (Charmian Klyve) Plum and Lucy (Dale) Paczkowski; sisters-in-law Joan Plum, Ruth Kressel and Patti Schmeling; nieces; nephews; and special family friends Kathie Yezek and Joanna Braat.

She was predeceased by her daughter Peggy Schmeling, daughter-in-law Kris Schmeling, son-in-law Bill Johnson, brother Paul Plum and brother-in-law Bob Schmeling.

A Christian burial mass will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, June 17 at St. Francis Borgia North Catholic Church, 1375 Covered Bridge Rd., Cedarburg.

The family will receive visitors at the church on Friday, June 17, from 11 a.m. until the start of mass at 1 p.m.

She will be buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Port Washington at a later date.

In lieu of flowers, memorials are suggested at St. Francis Borgia Catholic School, 1425 Covered Bridge Rd., Cedarburg, 53012, www.saintfrancisborgia.org.

Eernisse Funeral Home in Cedarburg is helping the family.

Online condolences can be posted at www.eernissefuneralhome.com.

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