Christian ministry – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 20:02:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Christian ministry – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 Phyllis Bushnell | Obituaries | Enid News and Eagle http://odessasem.com/phyllis-bushnell-obituaries-enid-news-and-eagle/ http://odessasem.com/phyllis-bushnell-obituaries-enid-news-and-eagle/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 19:22:10 +0000 http://odessasem.com/phyllis-bushnell-obituaries-enid-news-and-eagle/ Phyllis E. Bushnell August 18, 1924 – September 17, 2021 Longtime resident of Enid, OK, Phyllis E. Bushnell, 97, of Joplin, Missouri, died at 2:59 p.m. on Thursday, September 17, 2021 at Spring River Christian Village in Joplin. Phyllis was born August 18, 1924 in Osborne, KS, and had lived in Enid until she moved […]]]>

August 18, 1924
September 17, 2021

Longtime resident of Enid, OK, Phyllis E. Bushnell, 97, of Joplin, Missouri, died at 2:59 p.m. on Thursday, September 17, 2021 at Spring River Christian Village in Joplin.
Phyllis was born August 18, 1924 in Osborne, KS, and had lived in Enid until she moved to Joplin in 2008. Phyllis was employed as an accountant for Lambert’s clothing store in Enid for 26 years, taking her retired in 1993. She was a member of College Heights Christian Church in Joplin and served on the Department of Cheerleaders. She also volunteered with the US Department of Rehabilitation in Joplin. She was a long-time member of Davis Park Christian Church in Enid. Phyllis has assisted her husband, Bill Bushnell, in Christian ministry in several cities in Oklahoma, including Enid, Ponca City, Deer Creek, Waukomis, Medford, and Pleasant Vale.
Phyllis married Bill Bushnell on October 16, 1943 in Enid. He was predeceased in death on September 3, 2002. She was also predeceased by a sister, Charlene Williams, and a granddaughter, Susan McQueen. Survivors include two sons, Rick Bushnell (Sheryl), Joplin, MO, and Chris Bushnell (Diane), Louisville, KY; one daughter, Cindi Elrick-Real (Freddy), Boise, ID; 11 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren.
The family will receive friends from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday at the Mason-Woodard chapel in Joplin, followed by a sharing time at 5 p.m. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Enid’s Memorial Park Cemetery.
Commemorative contributions are requested from the Ministry of Circuit Riders in charge of the morgue. The arrangements have been entrusted to the Mason-Woodard Mortuary in Joplin, MO.

Published on September 18, 2021


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Hypocrisy of the defense of Christian values http://odessasem.com/hypocrisy-of-the-defense-of-christian-values/ http://odessasem.com/hypocrisy-of-the-defense-of-christian-values/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:34:00 +0000 http://odessasem.com/hypocrisy-of-the-defense-of-christian-values/ When Pope Francis recently paid a visit to so-called Catholic Hungary, it was short-lived. He felt unwelcome because he defends the rights and dignity of every migrant and refugee who seeks acceptance, understanding, shelter, care and help. But Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Hungarian officials tell Pope Francis they view refugees and migrants fleeing persecution […]]]>

When Pope Francis recently paid a visit to so-called Catholic Hungary, it was short-lived. He felt unwelcome because he defends the rights and dignity of every migrant and refugee who seeks acceptance, understanding, shelter, care and help. But Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Hungarian officials tell Pope Francis they view refugees and migrants fleeing persecution and hunger as a Mongol invasion. They gave Francis a copy of a 13th century letter from Hungarian King Bela IV to Pope Innocent IV. The letter called on the then Pope to help him resist the Mongol invasion of Hungary and Europe. Orban sees himself as the defender of Christian values ​​in Hungary and in Europe.

This is monumental hypocrisy. In addition, Orban is an autocratic right-wing leader who has hampered free speech and the media. According to a CNN report: “Balazs Orban, Deputy Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, described the giveaway on his Facebook page, saying: ‘There are many similarities between the situation then and today… we should learn from history. Pope Francis said, “My wish is that you are.. Founded and open, rooted and considerate” for the refugees.

The government of Catholic Poland is not very welcoming either, especially as asylum seekers from Belarus are turned away. According to data released by the Polish Interior Ministry, between August 1 and August 18 this year, some 2,100 migrants attempted to enter Poland via Belarus, of whom 1,342 were “barred from entering. “.

Among the least welcoming countries are those with an Orthodox Christian tradition: North Macedonia, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Catholic Hungary. They closed their borders and slammed the door in the face of thousands of desperate and homeless migrants and refugees. The refugees endure hardships and flee poverty, war, violence, hunger and misery, just like the parents of Jesus of Nazareth flee to Egypt pursued by the killers sent by King Herod. The heart of Jesus of Nazareth’s message is to welcome the stranger, to consider all people of equal worth, with equal rights and Children of God and to help and assist them as the Good Samaritan helped the dying on the brink. of the road . In this story, the priest and politician walked past, ignoring the plight of the man who was attacked by gangs and left to die. The story tells who is indeed the real neighbor. He is the person who helps the needy and shows love like the Good Samaritan did. The Samaritan himself was an outcast in the Jewish state at this time. Today Palestinians are excluded, occupied and oppressed by Israel to their eternal shame by ignoring their rights to freedom and justice in Palestine today. Thousands of Palestinians have fled abroad as migrants and refugees. Thousands of people around the world from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq seek asylum in Europe and refugees from South American countries seek asylum in the United States. The colonial conquest of nations caused centuries of global injustice, exploitation of natural resources, oppression of the poor, and glaring inequality and poverty in South America, Africa and Asia. Western nations were the colonialists and got richer because they engaged in exploitation supported by force and war. It continues today by proxy and now refugees and migrants are escaping the impossible living conditions caused by powerful nations like Russia in Syria and tyrants in South America in cahoots with multinational corporations in the West.

Among the most welcoming countries for migrants and refugees are Canada, Iceland, New Zealand, Australia and Sierra Leone, according to the Gallup Index. The United States of America was the sixth most welcoming country for migrants, followed by Burkina Faso, Sweden, Chad and Ireland., and Rwanda.

Recently Ireland, as an example, is cited as being tolerant and tolerant of migrants and refugees. He has undergone a massive change over the past twenty years, from Catholic to secular. It is becoming a more multicultural country with migrants and refugees adding to the mix of the population. However, change and acceptance come slowly. There are still negative attitudes towards migrants.

“The Irish Network Against Racism (INAR) has launched the 2020 findings of iReport.ie – the system for reporting racist incidents. He found that the total number of incidents has increased and that there have been a record number of hate speech incidents, ”a report said in the Irish Examiner from March 23, 2021.

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There were 700 racist incidents in 2020, up from 530 in 2019. It also reported 334 cases of racist hate speech, 159 criminal incidents, 51 racist assaults and 594 incidents of hate speech, all reaching a new high. “It was a bad year for everyone and the racism and hate crimes made it even worse for all minorities.” Most of these actions have apparently been directed against people of African descent.

Despite this, there is a high level of tolerance towards people of different faiths in Ireland. In 2011, a census revealed that there were 12,791 Filipinos living in Ireland. This has increased dramatically by 2021. They are hired workers for the health sector and the country depends on them for nursing services and they are warmly accepted.

Black Irish people are sometimes discriminated against but more accepted nowadays. Last year, 26-year-old Pamela Uba was crowned Miss Ireland 2021, becoming the first black woman in history to win the title. The competition has been running since 1947. It is “crazy to imagine that 74 years had passed before someone else won this award,” she said according to a BBC report. “I’m the first and it’s amazing – people look up to me and I never thought I would be in this position.”

Pamela moved from South Africa to the Republic of Ireland at the age of seven, with her mother and three siblings.

So times are really changing, and they will continue to do so.


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Pope Francis hopes that the new ministry of catechist “will awaken this vocation” http://odessasem.com/pope-francis-hopes-that-the-new-ministry-of-catechist-will-awaken-this-vocation/ http://odessasem.com/pope-francis-hopes-that-the-new-ministry-of-catechist-will-awaken-this-vocation/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 15:27:55 +0000 http://odessasem.com/pope-francis-hopes-that-the-new-ministry-of-catechist-will-awaken-this-vocation/ VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis said on Friday he had instituted the new ministry of catechist in the hope that it would help “awaken this vocation”.Addressing participants at a meeting organized by the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization on September 17, the Pope spoke of his decision to formally institute the […]]]>
VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis said on Friday he had instituted the new ministry of catechist in the hope that it would help “awaken this vocation”.

Addressing participants at a meeting organized by the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization on September 17, the Pope spoke of his decision to formally institute the new lay ministry in May.

He said: “We must insist on indicating the heart of catechesis: the Risen Jesus Christ loves you and never abandons you! We can never get tired or feel that we are repeating this first announcement in the different stages of the catechetical process.

“This is why I instituted the ministry of catechist. They prepare the rite for, I quote, the “creation” of catechists. So that the Christian community may feel the need to awaken this vocation and to experience the service of some men and women who, living the celebration of the Eucharist, feel more keenly the passion to transmit the faith as evangelizers.


The Pope established the new ministry by the apostolic letter Antiquum ministerium (“Old Ministry”) on May 11.

While catechists have served the Church since New Testament times, instituted ministry is a type of formal and vocational service within the Catholic Church.


The newly instituted catechist ministry is addressed to lay people who have a particular call to serve the Catholic Church as a teacher of the faith.

In the apostolic letter, the Pope declared that the Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments would “soon publish” the rite of institution of the new ministry.


In his speech, the Pope noted that he celebrated the closing Mass of the International Eucharistic Congress last Sunday in Budapest, Hungary.

He said that catechesis “can be effective in the work of evangelization if it keeps its gaze fixed on the Eucharistic mystery”.

“We cannot forget that the privileged place for catechesis is precisely the Eucharistic celebration, where brothers and sisters come together to discover more and more the different forms of the presence of God in their lives,” he said.

Addressing in the Clementine room of the Vatican to the Catholics responsible for catechesis in Europe, the Pope recalled with emotion the two catechists who prepared him for the first communion.

“I felt a great respect, even a feeling of thanksgiving, without making it explicit, but it felt like reverence,” he said.

“Why? Because they were the women who had prepared me for my first communion, with a nun. I want to tell you about this experience because it was a beautiful thing for me to accompany them until the end of their life, both. And also the nun who prepared me for the liturgical part of Communion: she died, and I was there, with her, accompanying her. There is a closeness, a very important link with the catechists… ”

Referring to the Directory of Catechesis, published in June 2020, he stated that catechesis should not be understood as “an abstract communication of theoretical knowledge to be memorized as mathematical or chemical formulas”.

“It is rather the mystagogical experience of those who learn to meet their brothers and sisters where they live and work, because they themselves have encountered Christ, who called them to become missionary disciples”, a- he declared.

He then referred to his speech on Monday at St. Martin’s Cathedral in Bratislava, in which he encouraged Slovak Catholics to draw inspiration from the saints. Cyril and Method, who translated the Bible into the Slavic language.

He said to the catechists in Rome: “They have traced new paths, invented new languages, new ‘alphabets’, to transmit the Gospel, for the inculturation of the faith.

“It requires knowing how to listen to people, to listen to the peoples we proclaim: to listen to their culture, their history; not listening superficially, already thinking about the prepackaged answers that we carry in our briefcase, no! Really listen, and compare these cultures, these languages, even and especially the unspoken, the unspoken, with the Word of God, with Jesus Christ, the living Gospel.

“And I repeat the question: is not this the most urgent task of the Church among the peoples of Europe? The great Christian tradition of the continent must not become a historical relic, otherwise it is no longer a “tradition”.

He continued, “The tradition is alive or it is not. And catechesis is tradition, it is trador [in Latin], to be passed on, but as a living tradition, from heart to heart, spirit to spirit, life to life. So: passionate and creative, with the impulse of the Holy Spirit.

“I have used the word ‘prepackaged’ for language, but I fear catechists whose hearts, attitudes and faces are ‘prepackaged’. No. Either the catechist is free, or he is not a catechist. The catechist lets himself be struck by the reality that he discovers and transmits the Gospel with great creativity, or is not a catechist. Think about it.


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Former athletes explore how sport shaped their faith and ministry http://odessasem.com/former-athletes-explore-how-sport-shaped-their-faith-and-ministry/ http://odessasem.com/former-athletes-explore-how-sport-shaped-their-faith-and-ministry/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 01:57:15 +0000 http://odessasem.com/former-athletes-explore-how-sport-shaped-their-faith-and-ministry/ Baylor Volleyball says a prayer ahead of their game against West Virginia. Joshua McSwain | Gathering By Kamri Alexandre | Journalist Baylor University is known for its Christian culture, but how does this play out in sports? Athletes spend their time at Baylor giving their all to be successful in their sport, but some also […]]]>

Baylor Volleyball says a prayer ahead of their game against West Virginia. Joshua McSwain | Gathering

By Kamri Alexandre | Journalist

Baylor University is known for its Christian culture, but how does this play out in sports? Athletes spend their time at Baylor giving their all to be successful in their sport, but some also actively fight to keep their faith first.

Baylor volleyball alumnus Braya Hunt said she knows firsthand that not only should your faith be brought into your sport, but also God come first in everything that happens on the pitch. . Hunt had a special experience when his coaches instilled a team culture that they themselves weren’t in charge, but Christ was.

“The staff used to say ‘We’re not the leader of this team, Christ is,’” Hunt said. “We just had a cool team culture that it wasn’t about [us], and I think that’s a lot what it is to be a Christian.

Hunt said it was already a divine thing that she was on the team because the coaches didn’t even come to see her play in high school, they just took a chance with her. She knew then that her volleyball career was not going to depend on her. Hunt saw God use her experience of striving to be a coachable player, a humble teammate, and a caring roommate to her teammates to transform her into the Christian she is today.

“[People] not have an opportunity like [Baylor] … Where your community… is just around the corner, ”said Hunt. “And it gets even more amplified when you’re part of a team.”

Hunt said God used his time on the volleyball team to make them look more like Christ. Hunt said that during his junior and senior years his main focus was to use his time on the team to bring Jesus to the lost. She saw teammates profess their faith, baptize each other, and experience what it means to be a community in the image of Christ.

“God can use sport… to have such eternal meaning,” Hunt said.

Hunt isn’t the only person who has seen God use sport to grow their faith. Joshua Ehambe, a sophomore at Truett Theological Seminary began ministering while playing football for the University of Kansas. While football was not an outlet for Ehambe to go pro, it turned out to be a step towards what God then had for him in ministry.

Ehambe said his Sports Department bases are in Kansas, where he has started to find ways to serve his team. While there, he would help start a group for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes to encourage group Bible studies for his teammates and other athletes on campus.

His time in sport, however, was not without challenges. A series of back-to-back trials left Ehambe questioning his faith. He was brought up to believe that if he had faith God would move mountains – but what if God did not move mountains? Questioning God during his difficult seasons while playing soccer led Ehambe to find answers about who God was and ultimately shaped him into who he is today.

“I firmly believe that trials train you to become what God has called you to be,” Ehambe said.

Ehambe’s goal after college was to embark on athletic development to make a difference for athletes from marginalized and diverse backgrounds. He wants them to know that professional sport is not their only way to be successful. Ehambe said faith, family and education are his core values ​​that fuel him today. When he got the opportunity to come to Baylor, and therefore postpone the start of his football career, Ehambe was at peace with his decision as he said it was God’s plan.

“Through one man’s disobedience came death and through another man’s obedience came life, so he’s bigger than me,” Ehambe said.

Behind every loyal athlete is usually an influential mentor. Baylor Baseball Chaplain and Recovery Support Coordinator for the Beauchamp Drug Addiction Recovery Center Stanton Corley is no stranger to taking an interest in athletes because, according to him, sport becomes a catalyst for their growth.

Corley played basketball for Appalachian State University and came to Baylor to pursue graduate studies in Sports Department at Truett. He was passionate about discipleship, so he went to the Student Life Center his first week as a graduate student to play basketball and get to know varsity athletes. It would be one of the first moments of Corley’s ministry at Baylor as he met a baseball player looking for a mentor.

Corley said it was no coincidence that he played SLC with these guys that day, as it would begin his journey of disciple with the baseball team. This led to him becoming their chaplain and Corely believes that was the reason he came to Waco.

“I’m looking here to connect with student-athletes… that’s what I’ve been called to do,” said Corley. “My wife and I left everything in Mississippi to come to Waco.”

Corely’s discipleship and mentorship has proven to be fruitful in his ministry at Baylor as he inspires athletes to pursue God and use their sport as a means to worship God. One of the challenges for Corley is that athletes often separate the “sacred” from the “secular”. Activities like prayer and Bible study are sacred to them and times to worship God. But there is a misconception that baseball, or any other sport, cannot be used to worship God either.

“What I’m trying to serve the players… is when you go there to practice today and play today… you go there to love it,” Corley said. “What I’m convinced is that athletes become better players…” No matter how I play, Jesus loves me. “”

Ehambe, Hunt and Corley were all asked what their encouragement would be, not just for an athlete but for anyone, and they all took this moment to show the gospel.

“God loves you,” Ehambe said. “Nothing can separate you from the love of God.”

“Seek first his kingdom and his righteousness,” said Hunt. “There will always be the ‘thing’ that seems most important in college … but seek its kingdom first.”

“Sports cannot and are not the most important in your life,” Corley said. “But I think it’s the most important way to display the goodness of God.”

During the hunt. Ehambe and Corley all come from different backgrounds, they all believe that God has used sport to change their lives and grow their faith, and along the way, they’ve invested in the faith of others as well.


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Religious news for September 17, 2021 | Community http://odessasem.com/religious-news-for-september-17-2021-community/ http://odessasem.com/religious-news-for-september-17-2021-community/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 15:48:01 +0000 http://odessasem.com/religious-news-for-september-17-2021-community/ BRIEFLY Free Clothing Drive Planned for Cedar Avenue Church Cedar Avenue Church of God, 1045 Cedar Ave. (corner French and Cedar), Sharon, is organizing a free clothing distribution from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on September 25 and October 23 in the church parking lot. Clothing for children and adults will be available in different […]]]>

BRIEFLY

Free Clothing Drive Planned for Cedar Avenue Church

Cedar Avenue Church of God, 1045 Cedar Ave. (corner French and Cedar), Sharon, is organizing a free clothing distribution from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on September 25 and October 23 in the church parking lot.

Clothing for children and adults will be available in different sizes.

Rabbi Nesanel Cadle on Crossing Paths TV

The local television ministry in Hermitage will join with Rabbi Nesanel Cadel’s ministry in raising funds to help Jewish families return to Israel.

The TV show will air at 5:30 p.m. Saturday and at noon Sunday on Cornerstone TV (CTVN) Nationwide, Spectrum, Comcast and Digital UHF 30 locally.

The program can also be seen on Dish and Direct TV in select areas, as well as FOX-WYFX, Youngstown, at 8:30 a.m. on Sundays. All programs can also be viewed on the web at www.crossingpaths.org

Evening song set

for this weekend

The sound of voices raised in praise will be heard this Sunday evening at Unity Church in Greenfield, 1857 Mercer West Middlesex Road (Route 318) in Lackawannock Township as “Evensong” begins again for the fall.

There will be a free dinner at 5.30 p.m. in the church social hall and singing in the sanctuary will begin at 6.30 p.m.

People of all faiths and fraternities are invited to attend this hymn singing program.

Those in attendance can choose any song they want from the Unity hymnbook and simply call the page number. The accompanists for “Evensong” are Janet Stahl on organ, Jane Bartholomew on piano and Sharon Burns on keyboard. Pastor Jim Moose is the leader.

Also at Unity, Sunday morning worship is at 11 a.m. All are invited to this traditional worship service. If people are comfortable wearing face masks, this is their choice.

Sunday School at Unity will begin on September 26 at 9:30 a.m. A study of the Psalms will take place.

Also on Thursday evenings at 7:00 pm there is a “Community Bible Study” which is an interfaith organization that caters through studying the Bible together.

For more information on any event at Unity, please call the church at 724-346-9501 and leave a message. Unity is accessible to people with reduced mobility through the side door of the car park.

The guest speaker is coming

to the second Baptist

Minister Toby Walker of Restoration Christian Life Ministries of Warren, Ohio, will be the guest speaker at Second Baptist Church in Sharpsville this Sunday.

The service will take place at 11:15 a.m.

Orangeville collection

for thanksgiving

Orangeville Baptist Church, Sharpsville, will be collecting items for Thanksgiving items, starting October 1.

Items needed include stuffing, sauce, mashed potatoes, butter, sweet potatoes, sugar, vegetables, salt, pepper, rolls, oil, pie, turkey, the whisk and the laundry baskets.

The church prepares a list to receive baskets. Families in need are urged to contact Pastor Harley or Andrea.

In addition, the church collects food for its pantry and clothes and household items for its fall gift.

Morning worship at the church at 7600 Orangeville Road begins at 11 a.m. Sunday school for all ages starts at 10 a.m.

Bible study and prayer take place every Wednesday at 7 p.m.

The Ladies’ Bible Study begins on October 7th. It will take place at 7:00 pm and the study will follow on “Let Him Go: How to Stop Running the Show and Start Walking in Faith”. Books cost $ 8.

In addition, another baptismal occasion is approaching. Contact Pastor Harley for more information.

Info: Call Pastor Harley Williams at 330-718-0119 or call the church phone at 724-646-3917.

Living Faith defines services

All are welcome at Lving Faith Christian Church, 829 New Castle Road, Farrell. Services are Sunday at 10:30 am The service is also broadcast on Radio 87.9 FM

Info: The church phone is 724-734-3176.


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Rev. Herschel C. Dugan | Aurora News-Subscribe http://odessasem.com/rev-herschel-c-dugan-aurora-news-subscribe/ http://odessasem.com/rev-herschel-c-dugan-aurora-news-subscribe/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 21:54:45 +0000 http://odessasem.com/rev-herschel-c-dugan-aurora-news-subscribe/ Body Reverend Herschel C. Dugan, 90, passed away on August 9, 2021 in Olathe, Kan. He was born April 13, 1931 to Charles and Harriet (Van Buren) Dugan in Mankato, Minn. After graduating from high school in Mankato, he attended Phillips University in Enid, Okla., Before seminary at Drake University in Des Moines. He then […]]]>

Body

Reverend Herschel C. Dugan, 90, passed away on August 9, 2021 in Olathe, Kan. He was born April 13, 1931 to Charles and Harriet (Van Buren) Dugan in Mankato, Minn. After graduating from high school in Mankato, he attended Phillips University in Enid, Okla., Before seminary at Drake University in Des Moines. He then obtained a doctorate in ministry from Phillips Theological Seminary.
On July 28, 1960, he married Shirley Tietsort in Omaha. He served churches in Oklahoma, Omaha, Aurora (1963-68), Olathe and the Des Moines area before retiring in 1996. His Christian faith and passion for justice led him to come to Hattiesburg , Mississippi, in 1964 to register black voters. As a minister of the Disciples of Christ denomination, he was known to build relationships and be there for people in times of need.
He was a member of Saint Andrew’s Christian Church in Olathe where his daughter, Denise, is the Associate Pastor of Faith Training; a Rotarian and Mason; and chaplain of the Olathe Fire Department for a decade. He and Shirley enjoyed traveling across the United States and Canada, as well as trips abroad; Herschel led several tour groups to Israel. His interests included cycling, photography, cars and later in life he loved to paint.
He was predeceased by his parents and a sister. Herschel is survived by his wife, Shirley; their daughter, Denise Dugan (Steve Siebers); his son, Mark Dugan, and his sons, Ryan and Connor. Private burial took place at the Olathe Memorial Cemetery, with a memorial service to be held at a later date. Condolences can be sent to: Shirley Dugan at 15329 S. Lone Elm Rd, # 328 at Olathe, 66061-6207, and memorials are suggested at the Saint Andrew Christian Church Legacy Fund, https://sacchome.org/give/.


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Obituary of C. Ferrill (1931 – 2021) – Clinton, IL http://odessasem.com/obituary-of-c-ferrill-1931-2021-clinton-il/ http://odessasem.com/obituary-of-c-ferrill-1931-2021-clinton-il/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 15:33:07 +0000 http://odessasem.com/obituary-of-c-ferrill-1931-2021-clinton-il/ Rev. C. Don Ferrill June 23, 1931 – September 7, 2021 CLINTON – Reverend C. Don Ferrill was born in Clinton, Illinois. on June 23, 1931 to Charlie and Eva (Conn) Ferrill. He went to join his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on September 7, 2021. He grew up on a farm just west of […]]]>

Rev. C. Don Ferrill

June 23, 1931 – September 7, 2021

CLINTON – Reverend C. Don Ferrill was born in Clinton, Illinois. on June 23, 1931 to Charlie and Eva (Conn) Ferrill. He went to join his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on September 7, 2021. He grew up on a farm just west of Weldon Springs State Park where he spent the first part of his life working as a farmer. alongside his family. He also worked at Revere to make cartridge cases. Don received his call to ministry six years after high school. He soon went to Eastern Illinois University and Evangelical Theological Seminary to become a local pastor.

Pastor Don served many churches in central Illinois over 65 years of Christian ministry, including: 1956 Oakley-Garver Brick EUB, 1963 Saybrook EUB, 1968 Peoria Grace UMC, 1976 Clinton UMC, 1988 Danville St. James UMC , 1997 Retired from UMC, 2000 Clinton Presbyterian, 2005 Decatur Grace UMC, 2013 Weldon UMC, 2019 Kenny UMC.

Don has been married to the love of his life Fran (Hall) Ferrill for 52 years. Fran was not only his best friend, but the wife of a faithful and dedicated pastor and ministry partner. Don had two sons: Timothy James (Mindy) Ferrill and Peter Andrew Ferrill. He has eight grandchildren: Irelyn, Landyn, Layne, Kieran and Drayden Ferrill, Hope Ferrill, Hayden (Sidney) Maurice and Laurenn Maurice. He has a great-grandchild Tate Maurice. Don has an older sister Marjorie (Joe) Shearer of Villa Grove and a younger brother Ross (Dorothy) Ferrill of Argenta. He has a sister-in-law Beverly (Don) Swanstrom of Gibson City and a brother-in-law Dr. Samuel Hall of St. Paul, MN. Don has countless nieces and nephews and great-nieces and great-nephews.

Pastor Don’s greatest passion and purpose in life was to be a witness to others in our world for Jesus Christ. He loved God, the church, the local pastors and gave his life for the mission of telling others about Jesus. His life and ministry impacted countless thousands of lives with the good news of the gospel of hope, healing, salvation, and victory through faith in Jesus Christ.

His visit will be from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., followed by his Celebration of Life service from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 11, 2021, both located at the Clinton United Methodist Church. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in his honor at the Tabernacle Church located at 1845 W. Hovey Ave. in Normal, IL. or any church of your choice.

Calvert Funeral Home, Clinton, IL assisted the family with the cremation rites.

Published by Decatur Herald & Review on September 10, 2021.


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No more crusaders: what Christians and Arab Muslims think …… | News and reports http://odessasem.com/no-more-crusaders-what-christians-and-arab-muslims-think-news-and-reports/ http://odessasem.com/no-more-crusaders-what-christians-and-arab-muslims-think-news-and-reports/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 18:48:25 +0000 http://odessasem.com/no-more-crusaders-what-christians-and-arab-muslims-think-news-and-reports/ Nestled in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, Evangel University will no longer evoke the Middle East or the Middle Ages. Since 1955, the flagship institution of the Assemblies of God has acclaimed its crusaders, filled with helmeted knights and couriers. This semester, the university will announce its new mascot soon after reviewing nearly 300 submitted […]]]>

Nestled in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, Evangel University will no longer evoke the Middle East or the Middle Ages.

Since 1955, the flagship institution of the Assemblies of God has acclaimed its crusaders, filled with helmeted knights and couriers.

This semester, the university will announce its new mascot soon after reviewing nearly 300 submitted suggestions, including 77 animal names, 69 military names, and 38 Biblical names. The change was made in light of the school’s 55,000 alumni serving overseas.

“The world has changed dramatically since the 1950s, when the Evangelist community, intending to represent strength, honor, and commitment to the faith, first identified a crusader as the school mascot. Acting President George O. Wood said in March, when the decision was made to drop the name.

“Today, we recognize that the Crusader often prevents students and alumni from proudly representing the university in their areas of world work and ministry.”

For some alumni, the change is slow in coming. The review process began in 2007.

“When you want to share the love of Christ, you don’t want to identify with something that ends the conversation,” said Emily Greene, class of 2008. “It’s the equivalent of saying ‘jihadist’ to an American Christian, evoking a cruel character.

Greene grew up as a history-loving child missionary in predominantly Muslim Kazakhstan. But her father sat her down when she first met the Crusades, and made it clear to her: We don’t use that word here.

Upon further study, Greene discovered that the Crusaders weren’t necessarily the right ones. But with Evangel, imagery was everywhere. The campus newspaper was called Spear. The cafeteria was “La Joute”.

In his senior year, Greene signed a petition against Crusader’s name.

But the disgust did not come only from his unique upbringing. His American and non-Christian family members also resented the college mascot.

Not as harshly as many Muslims, of course.

“One thing about the story here they never forget,” said an American Christian worker linked to Evangel, who requested anonymity for the sake of his ministry in Turkey.

“Many believe that missionaries are the modern crusaders.”

He described posters urging parents to take precautions against such strangers throwing their babies off a cliff. Common is the feeling that Christian workers are also spies.

“I believe Evangel is doing the right thing,” he said. “We are extremely careful not to talk about it [Crusaders] name in any context.

A month before Evangel, the University of Valparaiso, a Lutheran institution in Indiana, announced in February that it was dropping its own nickname of Crusaders. Last month, the school renamed its sports teams the Beacons.

“We are beacons of knowledge for the academic, social and spiritual growth of our students,” said University President José Padilla, linking the new name to the school’s motto: In Thy Light, We See Light.

“Above all, we are beacons of God’s light in the world. We light the way for our students, so that once they graduate, they will enlighten others. “

But unlike Evangel, the school popularly known as “Valpo” hosts a large Muslim community. While centering its Lutheran heritage and requiring the study of theology, the school does not require a declaration of Christian faith for students.

“As a Muslim, I was embarrassed to come to Valpo because the school mascot was a crusader, even though my mom and older siblings came here before me,” said Jenna Rifai, class from 2021.

“It’s like, in their minds, do they accept me?” Are they anti-Muslims? I know it looks like a small picture, but symbols have power. “

But Rifai also became well-known on campus for her TEDx talk in Valparaiso, where she described how seductive interactions with students during a dreaded class on “Trump’s America” ​​helped her find peace.

The course was taught by Heath Carter, now Associate Professor of American Christianity at Princeton Theological Seminary.

“There have been a lot more scrutiny of names and mascots in recent years, and this represents a critical turning point in how we view our history,” he said.

“As a Christian, I think it can be very faithful to reassess what we hold up as examples and models. There is a calculation going on, and it is possible to see Valpo as part of this movement. “

Evangel, however, quickly distanced itself from any larger societal movement. Its FAQ page emphasizes that the mascot change is not a “culture cancellation reaction” but a requirement of the school’s “Christ-centered orientation”.

It’s a bit of a trend among Christian institutions, however. Wheaton College dropped its nickname Crusaders in 2000, followed by University of the Incarnate Word in 2004, Northwest Christian University (now Bushnell) in 2008, Eastern Nazarene College in 2009, and Alvernia University and the Northwest Nazarene University in 2017.

But according to mascotdb.com, which lists hundreds of high schools and higher education institutions that have carried the moniker, a dozen colleges still use it, including the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts.

“The literal definition of the word ‘one marked with the cross of Christ’ was appropriate for the Jesuit and Catholic intellectual and spiritual tradition of our institution,” President Philip Boroughs said in 2018, when the college decided to keep the name.

“We are crusaders for human rights, social justice and environmental protection; for the respect of different perspectives, cultures, traditions and identities; and for service around the world, especially for the underserved and vulnerable.

But the image still caused consternation. A month later, Holy Cross ditched his knight as the college mascot, only to be eliminated from the school’s symbolism and branding altogether.

Will it make a difference?

Across the ocean, evangelicals in the Middle East are hesitating. Whether the anti-crusader spirit is a consequence of US domestic politics or concern for the gospel in the world, their problems are far greater than the fluffy mascots.

“Americans are sensitive and try to adapt to everything and everyone,” said Wageeh Mikhail, Egyptian engagement director for ScholarLeaders. “But I don’t think that makes sense to Muslims or Christians in the Middle East.

“It’s irrelevant.”

Instead, it focuses on the modern poor translation of the Crusades into Arabic. An expert on historical relations between Muslims and Christians, he said that contemporary Muslims, Christians and Jews all called the conflict of the Middle Ages “wars of the Franks.”

It was not until about the 18th century, Mikhail said, that Muslim polemicists began to translate the conflict as “the wars of the cross bearers.” But today, it is the term that has universal use in Arabic.

Imad Shehadeh, president of Jordan Evangelical Theological Seminary, made a similar point, pointing out that most Christians in the Middle East stood with Muslims against the Crusaders.

But given the abuse of a perfectly good word—crusade– it resonated with the College of the Holy Cross.

“It would be better to give the true intention of the word rather than fall into the trap of the unfair and damaging way in which it has been described,” he said. “We can’t keep changing our vocabulary just because a group uses it, not literally, but with a nuance meant to hurt.”

Martin Accad, however, resonated with Jenna Rifai. Symbols hold power.

“Christian students can sit in their dormitory in Valparaiso and read about how Jesus taught us to love and be peacemakers whatever they want,” the associate professor of Islamic studies told the Arab Baptist Theological Seminary, in Beirut.

“But then they go out to watch a soccer game and cheer on the team, and the Crusader mascot has more of an impact on their subconscious than any of the books they’ve just read.”

Meanwhile, Muslims have their own issues, he said.

Mosque preachers are also adept at stirring up crowds. Even when their complaint is political, rhetoric tinged with theology often predominates.

Accad underlined the term kafir as particularly problematic. Translated as “unbeliever” or “infidel,” moderate Muslim scholars often fail to recognize the real harm this classic language causes to contemporary interfaith relations.

“Christians and Muslims both have a lot of work to do in terms of revising elements of their religious language that plague everyday relationships,” Accad said.

“We have to create new symbols.

Hussein Shahine, a Shia Muslim, thinks Beacons works very well.

“This will help the identity of the Valpo school to rest on something stronger: its academic reputation,” said the 2017-18 student body president. “The Crusaders didn’t offend me, but I understand how uncomfortable history can make people.”

It does for him, but with a twist.

Born in Dearborn, Michigan, Shahine grew up in one of the Christian villages in the predominantly Shia region of Baalbek, Lebanon. He heard church bells every Sunday and never considered that his religion made him different from other Lebanese.

Until studying the Crusades.

“The Sunni Muslims destroyed the Shiite Caliphate of Egypt and the Syrian Mujahedin treated us like garbage,” he said of the occupation of Saladin in 1169, before the Sultan launched his campaign against The crusaders.

“There have been massacres on all sides, and nothing good has come of it. “

His older brother applied to Valparaiso for a football scholarship, and their father laughed when he learned of the mascot’s story at the time. But as the president of the student body, Shahine never heard Muslims complain.

And years later, his family is still proud of his association with the school.

“Valpo is truly a place of light and has made us good men of character,” Shahine said. “I am proud to call myself a crusader.”

It is a beautiful tribute to Christian education. But names still matter – deeply.

“Evangel was a great school and it shaped me,” Greene said.

“But I would never call myself a crusader.”


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New Bible Translation Embraces Native American Cultural Concepts | Church and ministry news http://odessasem.com/new-bible-translation-embraces-native-american-cultural-concepts-church-and-ministry-news/ http://odessasem.com/new-bible-translation-embraces-native-american-cultural-concepts-church-and-ministry-news/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 21:46:26 +0000 http://odessasem.com/new-bible-translation-embraces-native-american-cultural-concepts-church-and-ministry-news/ Through Michel Gryboski, Christian Post reporter | Wednesday 01 September 2021 Unsplash / Madeleine Ragsdale A new English translation of the New Testament aimed specifically at conveying Christian beliefs through cultural concepts and Native American storytelling has been published. Title on First Nations Version: An Indigenous Translation of the New Testament, it was published Tuesday […]]]>
Bible
Unsplash / Madeleine Ragsdale

A new English translation of the New Testament aimed specifically at conveying Christian beliefs through cultural concepts and Native American storytelling has been published.

Title on First Nations Version: An Indigenous Translation of the New Testament, it was published Tuesday by InterVarsity Press.

First Nations version of the New Testament
The cover of “First Nations Version: An Indigenous Translation of the New Testament,” published August 31, 2021. |

The English translation sought to balance the common cultural patterns of Native Americans while remaining true to Christian theological concepts set forth in the New Testament.

One example is John 3:16, rendered in the new international version commonly used as “For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life.”

In the FNV, it is rendered: “The Great Spirit loves this world of human beings so deeply that he has given us his Son, the only Son who fully represents him. All those who trust him and his path will not end badly, but will have the life of the world to come that will never fade – full of beauty and harmony.

IVP editor-in-chief Al Hsu told the Christian Post that the project benefited from a significant contribution from Native Americans representing a wide range of tribes in North America.

The lead translator, Terry Wildman, himself of Native American descent, worked with a council of 12 Native Americans from different tribes and places, including men, women, pastors, elders and young adults.

“The team engaged with Indigenous churches, sharing samples and collecting feedback on potential use throughout the process. Other reviewers and cultural consultants from over 25 different tribal heritages were also partnering with the team throughout the process, ”Hsu explained.

“The feedback received from Aboriginal churches, leaders and Bible scholars after more than 1,300 drafts of the Book of Luke translation were received has been overwhelmingly positive and many suggestions have also been incorporated. “

In addition, Hsu noted, there was “close collaboration” on the project with groups such as Wycliffe Associates of Orlando and OneBook, a Canadian organization that focuses on helping translation projects for indigenous peoples of the United States. planet.

“There just haven’t been many translations of the Bible specifically for Native Americans, and certainly no translations made by Native people for Native people. Most of the Bible translations and Christian publications have been done by predominantly white communities, ”Hsu continued.

“While this has, of course, produced many excellent translations of the Bible into English for our study and edification, we may have missed some things in the scriptures. “

According to one description online, the First Nations version tells the Christian scriptures “following the tradition of the oral cultures of Native storytellers.”

“This way of speaking, with its simple yet profound beauty and rich cultural idioms, still resonates in the hearts of First Nations people,” the description says.

InterVarsity acquired the publishing rights to the FNV Bible in response to its use by their on-campus ministry wing, specifically its First Nations Outreach, Native InterVarsity.

“We reviewed the FNV gospels and some of the epistles, and were impressed by its fresh and vivid interpretation of the scriptures in a way that recalled its original biblical context,” Hsu recalled.

“InterVarsity and IVP have been committed from the start to helping readers understand, experience, and live the truth of the scriptures, and so we reclaimed the FNV New Testament publishing rights as a way to help readers rediscover the Word of God.

In recent years, churches and Christian ministries have made multiple efforts to raise awareness among Native American populations through reconciliation projects and translations of religious works.

In 2018, for example, the Episcopal Church awarded a $ 45,000 grant to the Episcopal Diocese of South Dakota for a project to translate the Book of Common Prayer into contemporary Lakota.

Follow Michael Gryboski on Twitter or Facebook



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Love each other (part II) http://odessasem.com/love-each-other-part-ii/ http://odessasem.com/love-each-other-part-ii/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 18:43:44 +0000 http://odessasem.com/love-each-other-part-ii/ Michael F. Chandler I recently enjoyed a visit with my two brothers. The three of us grew up together and shared similar experiences. We have mutual love for our parents – mom is now in eternity but dad alert and still happy to see his family together. There is an indescribable peace, respect and affection […]]]>

Michael F. Chandler

I recently enjoyed a visit with my two brothers. The three of us grew up together and shared similar experiences. We have mutual love for our parents – mom is now in eternity but dad alert and still happy to see his family together.

There is an indescribable peace, respect and affection that we feel when we are with each other. It is very special. My wife and I had the same blessing of having three sons, and as they grew older we taught them the wisdom of Proverbs 17:17: “A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity ”.

We always say to them, “You share the same blood, so continue to nurture this brotherly love; develop your mutual faith in Christ; Honor each other, support each other and pray for one another. You need each other and when adversity strikes you will not be alone.


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