Religious academy – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:22:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Religious academy – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 Hundreds protest against vaccine warrant for children at California State Capitol – CBS Sacramento https://odessasem.com/hundreds-protest-against-vaccine-warrant-for-children-at-california-state-capitol-cbs-sacramento/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 02:29:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/hundreds-protest-against-vaccine-warrant-for-children-at-california-state-capitol-cbs-sacramento/ SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – Protesters on the steps of the California State Capitol called on Monday for an end of COVID-19 vaccine mandates in schools. The protest drew activists from across the state. Hundreds of people gathered to relay their message loud and clear. READ MORE: Over 1,600 potted plants seized in Valley Springs; 1 city […]]]>
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Rita LEWANDOWSKI Obituary (2022) – Buffalo, NY https://odessasem.com/rita-lewandowski-obituary-2022-buffalo-ny/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 08:11:34 +0000 https://odessasem.com/rita-lewandowski-obituary-2022-buffalo-ny/ LEWANDOWSKI GNSH- Sister Rita, (formerly Sister Thomas More)Sister Rita Lewandowski, GNSH, (formerly Sister Thomas More) (89), passed away on Sunday December 26, 2021. Rita was born in Buffalo, NY on October 26, 1932, daughter of the late Walter and Florence A. (Gajewski) Lewandowski . Sister graduated from South Park High with a BA with Honors […]]]>
LEWANDOWSKI GNSH-
Sister Rita,
(formerly Sister Thomas More)
Sister Rita Lewandowski, GNSH, (formerly Sister Thomas More) (89), passed away on Sunday December 26, 2021. Rita was born in Buffalo, NY on October 26, 1932, daughter of the late Walter and Florence A. (Gajewski) Lewandowski . Sister graduated from South Park High with a BA with Honors in Latin from D’Youville College and an MA in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. Postgraduate work was carried out at Villanova and Temple Universities. Sister held a permanent license from NY and PA as a specialist in reading, as well as a permanent license from NY in Latin. The sister was a member of the Kappa Gamma Pi Honor Society.
A long-time educator, Sister Rita has influenced the lives of countless young people and adults by introducing them to the world of reading and literacy. Prior to joining the Gray Nuns of the Sacred Heart in 1961, she was an instructor at Marymount Junior College, Arlington, Virginia, where she taught philosophy, English, and world literature. Her ministerial assignments as a gray nun took her to PA, GA and NY. Sister taught at Sacred Heart Junior College, Yardley, PA for six years and D’Youville College for two years. For over 38 years, Sister Rita’s ministry has focused on the Buffalo area. Students at the Immaculate Conception, Eden, and Holy Angels School and Academy benefited from her experience. For ten years she was a reading specialist at several local schools, St. Aloysius Gonzaga, All Saints, St. Joseph’s Academy, St. Augustine Center and St. Bonaventure. Turning to adult literacy in 1991, she engaged and challenged those attending the Adult Learning Center to discover the joys of reading. The sister continued this ministry until 2007, upon her retirement she became a volunteer teacher with the Literacy Volunteers of Western New York until 2015. She moved to Philadelphia in December of the same year. Predeceased by her brother Richard, Rita is survived by her nephew in addition to her religious congregation. Sharing memories at 9.45 a.m., funeral mass will follow at 10 a.m. on Saturday, January 8 (Chapel of the Sisters Redemptrors, 521 Moredon Rd., Huntingdon Valley, PA. Burial at Resurrection Cemetery, Bensalem, PA. Memorial contributions can be made. to the Gray Nuns of the Sacred Heart, 14500 Bustleton Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19116-1188 or at www.greynun.org.

Posted by Buffalo News on January 2, 2022.

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Mass State Police soldier denounces job loss over vaccination warrant https://odessasem.com/mass-state-police-soldier-denounces-job-loss-over-vaccination-warrant/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:20:13 +0000 https://odessasem.com/mass-state-police-soldier-denounces-job-loss-over-vaccination-warrant/ The first mass state police soldier who received the ax over the state’s coronavirus vaccine mandate speaks out about the ‘humiliating’ experience and termination process. Timothy Barry, 29, said he was still “in disbelief” after being pulled from a state police training course in late October and stripped of his police gear in front of […]]]>

The first mass state police soldier who received the ax over the state’s coronavirus vaccine mandate speaks out about the ‘humiliating’ experience and termination process.

Timothy Barry, 29, said he was still “in disbelief” after being pulled from a state police training course in late October and stripped of his police gear in front of around 40 comrades. He had not received a COVID-19 vaccine by the mid-October deadline.

The Marine Corps veteran, who was assigned to the Mounted State Police Unit, then became the first state to be recommended for dismissal.

“I was honored at the State Police Academy, and now being the only one recommended for dismissal, I really feel isolated,” Barry told the Herald this week.

Timothy Barry is a Marine Corps veteran. (Photo by Massachusetts State Police)

“I was incredulous,” he added. “It was my dream job to be a state soldier, and I have never shamed this organization. It is truly disappointing and heartbreaking.

The Quincy resident recounted his experience on Oct. 28 at State Police Academy in New Braintree.

Barry drove the two hours to the training class, then was “blinded” in front of the class. He had submitted a religious exemption for the vaccine but was in limbo, he said.

“I was taken out of a class of 30 to 40 people, and they didn’t try to quietly remove me,” Barry said. “I must have emptied my cruiser as the whole class looked at me, as if I had done something wrong.

“I had to return all my police tools,” he added. “It’s not like I’ve committed a domestic or violent crime. It was really overkill … It was humiliating.

He was removed from his post, placed on unpaid leave, and was later recommended for dismissal during the vax tenure.

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The biggest achievements and openings of architectural projects of 2021 | News https://odessasem.com/the-biggest-achievements-and-openings-of-architectural-projects-of-2021-news/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 00:01:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/the-biggest-achievements-and-openings-of-architectural-projects-of-2021-news/ 2021 was the year many long-delayed large-scale projects finally managed to come to an end, overcome further pandemic-induced delays postponed from 2020, overcome remaining certification hurdles and open their doors to l anticipation (and sometimes locked) Public. Among the plethora of completed and newly opened buildings we’ve had the pleasure to cover this year, here’s […]]]>

2021 was the year many long-delayed large-scale projects finally managed to come to an end, overcome further pandemic-induced delays postponed from 2020, overcome remaining certification hurdles and open their doors to l anticipation (and sometimes locked) Public.

Among the plethora of completed and newly opened buildings we’ve had the pleasure to cover this year, here’s our curated list of some of the most notable developments in Los Angeles, New York, Paris, Berlin, Shenzhen, and more.

Photo © Iwan Baan Studios, courtesy of the Academy Museum Foundation

Academy of Cinema Museum, Los Angeles

LA’s latest architectural highlight had been a long time to prepare, first appearing nearly a decade ago on Archinect, but after numerous delays and postponements of opening – related to Covid and others – the Museum of Academy cinema designed by Renzo Piano and adjacent to LACMA finally open to the public with a star-studded gala in September. Another major Piano project, the House of Culture GES-2, debuted in Moscow in December.

Photo © Michael Grimm

Small Island, New York

Hotly contested in its early days, and even quashed by the courts at one point, the Little Island Elevated River Park opened with great fanfare on the shore of the Hudson River in Manhattan in May. Formerly known as Pier 55, the $ 260 million attraction was designed by the team of Thomas Heatherwick and Signe Nielsen of landscape architecture firm MNLA.

Photo © Virgile Simon Bertrand, courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron

M + Museum, Hong Kong

Considered one of the largest museums of modern and contemporary visual art in the world, the brand new M + Museum has finally opened in the cultural district of West Kowloon in Hong Kong. The $ 750 million cultural center was designed by Herzog & de Meuron and TFP Farrells, who won the international architectural competition launched in 2012. Other notable Herzog & de Meuron openings this year include the SongEun Art Space in Seoul, Korea and the MKM Küppersmühle Museum in Duisburg, Germany.

Photo © Patrick Tourneboeuf

Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris

Another leading artistic destination, the Bourse de Commerce – Collection Pinault, opened its doors in Paris after a long renovation and restoration of its 18th century house supervised by Tadao Ando in collaboration with Lucie Niney and Thibaut Marca of the NeM agency. and Pierre-Antoine Gatier. In a somewhat different tone, the Japanese master also opened a stylish public restroom in Shibuya this year as part of the THE TOKYO TOILET project.

Photo © Jason O’Rear, Courtesy of OMA New York

Audrey Irmas Pavilion, Los Angeles

Technically no officially open until January 2022, the Audrey Irmas pavilion designed by OMA New York made major advancements in construction in Los Angeles this year, making it the company’s first religious institution building. OMA also completed the Tenjin Business Center in Fukuoka, Japan this year, as well as the new Paris flagship Off-White in collaboration with Virgil Abloh, who tragically passed away at age 41 this year.

Photo © Simon Menges

Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin

David Chipperfield Architects accepted the challenge of renovating one of the great masterpieces of mid-century modern architecture and completed a stunning renovation of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin in August.

Photo: Lucas Blair Simpson © SOM

Moynihan Station, New York

The start of the year also saw the opening of a major infrastructure project in New York City: over two decades underway under the leadership of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, the new Moynihan Train Hall offers 225 rail. 000 square foot welcome extension of the hub to the notoriously overcrowded Pennsylvania station complex.

Photo: Steve Hall © Hall + Merrick Photographers, 2021

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia

Frank Gehry’s $ 233 million renovation and expansion of the Philadelphia Museum of Art opened to the public in May after years of planning and construction. The office also celebrated the launch of its brilliant Luma Tower in Luma Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France and the highly anticipated Youth Orchestra Los Angeles Center at the LA Philharmonic in Inglewood.

Photo © Pierre-Olivier Deschamps, courtesy of SANAA

La Samaritaine department store, Paris

In Paris, the famous La Samaritaine department store reopened in June following a multi-year, $ 894 million restoration that surprisingly pits the historic against modern elements. SANAA’s Japanese office worked in tandem with Canadian studio Yabu Pushelberg and received praise from French President Emmanuel Macron, who called the building a “superb French cultural treasure”.

Photo © Ossip van Duivenbode, courtesy of MVRDV

Boijmans Van Beuningen depot, Rotterdam

MVRDV’s new Boijmans Van Beuningen Depot opened in November under the banner of “the world’s first publicly accessible art storage depot”, housing 151,000 works of art in a brilliant 167,000 square foot facility, which reviewer Oliver Wainwright compared to an “Ikea salad for € 3.99. bowl.”

Photo © Liang Xue, courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

Infinitus Square, Baiyun

Zaha Hadid Architects completed a mastodon of an infinity symbol in the Chinese city of Baiyun, in Guangdong province this year. The design team proudly emphasizes the sustainability characteristics of mixed-use development, including the filtration and reuse of rainwater, as well as the increased use of recycled materials.

Photo © Zhang Chao

Hanking Center, Shenzhen

Morphosis set a world record by designing the new Hanking Center as the tallest detached core building in the world. The 1,180-foot-tall mixed-use complex was just one of many new skyline-altering buildings to debut in Shenzhen.

Photo: Doblecaña / Wikipedia

Intempo, Benidorm

Enclosing the pack is a banger of a building: the 650-foot M-shaped Intempo skyscraper in the Spanish seaside town of Benidorm has finally been completed after a 15-year construction period strewn with delays and setbacks. A building only a developer could love, the Golden Tower elicited instant responses from Archinectors in the comments section. Do not hesitate if you feel like it.

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President Aoun in a religious interview at Christmas: one is linked to his land, the other without land is a refugee https://odessasem.com/president-aoun-in-a-religious-interview-at-christmas-one-is-linked-to-his-land-the-other-without-land-is-a-refugee/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 12:03:44 +0000 https://odessasem.com/president-aoun-in-a-religious-interview-at-christmas-one-is-linked-to-his-land-the-other-without-land-is-a-refugee/ The President of the Republic, General Michel Aoun, appealed to the Lebanese on Christmas Eve in a religious interview inspired by the spiritual occasion, during which he spoke with his interlocutors, his colleague Abdel Helou, former archbishop of Ferzol, Zahlé and de la Bekaa for the Melkites. Mgr Issam Yohanna Darwish, Greek-Catholic Archbishop, on religious […]]]>

The President of the Republic, General Michel Aoun, appealed to the Lebanese on Christmas Eve in a religious interview inspired by the spiritual occasion, during which he spoke with his interlocutors, his colleague Abdel Helou, former archbishop of Ferzol, Zahlé and de la Bekaa for the Melkites. Mgr Issam Yohanna Darwish, Greek-Catholic Archbishop, on religious aspects and his impressions.

The President also spoke about his vision of the Christian faith and how to apply it in daily life.

President Aoun underlined the importance of the great meanings that Christmas carries and the values ​​of love that Jesus called, and the importance of the Virgin Mary and the Bible in consolidating these values ​​in the daily life of the believer, and face the difficulties and problems that he encounters on a daily basis.

In addition, President Aoun clarified that he had acquired faith gradually, and that the “knowledge trap” played a role, specifying that his faith was reflected in the consolidation of his attachment to the land and to the country.

“A person is linked to his society and to the land. A person without a homeland is a refugee, and this strengthens the bond between man and the land, ”said the president.

President Aoun also considered that Lebanon has citizens of all religions and brings together multiple civilizations, if coexistence is present peacefully and based on good deeds and love between individuals and groups, then it constitutes two models. for it.

“This is why I proposed the creation of the Académie de l’Homme pour la Convergence et le Dialogue, which studies civilizations, religions and the traditions that accompany them. I believe that the resulting culture promotes peace among human beings. So, as long as we all recognize God as the Creator, why do we kill and love each other, because the earth welcomes all human beings, ”continued President Aoun.

In addition, President Aoun underlined that “What the Lebanese suffer and live today is the result of the actions of those who previously exercised responsibilities, and these people should be a good example for the citizen because they were the front of the Lebanese. society and they are entrusted with the lives of citizens who are suffering today, hence the right to self-defense, that is to say the necessities of life ”.

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Infamous ESPN Rash By IMG Academy Was Against School ‘Scam’, Ohio Says https://odessasem.com/infamous-espn-rash-by-img-academy-was-against-school-scam-ohio-says/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 13:33:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/infamous-espn-rash-by-img-academy-was-against-school-scam-ohio-says/ COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio school whose legitimacy was examined after its allegedly top football team was defeated in an ESPN televised game against Manatee County’s IMG Academy Nor did it live up to its educational billing: it turned out to be “a scam,” according to an Ohio Department of Education investigation. Republican Gov. […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio school whose legitimacy was examined after its allegedly top football team was defeated in an ESPN televised game against Manatee County’s IMG Academy Nor did it live up to its educational billing: it turned out to be “a scam,” according to an Ohio Department of Education investigation.

Republican Gov. Mike DeWine has said he is asking the attorney general and other officials to determine whether any laws were broken by what claimed to be Bishop Sycamore High School in the Columbus area. DeWine also said he would work with state education officials and lawmakers to adopt the changes recommended by the department to avoid a repeat of the situation.

“Ohio families should be able to count that our schools educate students and not just exist in name as a vehicle for high school sports,” DeWine said in a written statement Friday.

The state has found no evidence that Bishop Sycamore enrolled multiple students this year and concluded that he did not meet minimum standards, including for academic offerings and student safety, according to the investigation. ODE launched after the team’s 58-0 televised loss to powerhouse IMG Academy, a prep boarding school and athletic training destination in Bradenton, in August.

Bishop Sycamore’s report filed with the ministry for that school year listed only one student enrolled and listed their physical address as a house in a residential area.

In a call with a department official last month, Bishop Sycamore administrator Andre Peterson described his program as a way to gain more visibility for football players who were struggling to get into the clubs. colleges, according to the ODE report.

Messages requesting comment were left in Peterson on Saturday by phone and through the school’s email address. In previous comments reported by USA TODAY Sports, Peterson had denied that there had been a “scam” at the unbalanced football game or at the school, saying it helped players hoping to compete in college.

She identified herself with ODE as an “unlicensed, non-tax-funded school,” a category which is largely outside the oversight of the ministry and which allows some typical operating systems to be bypassed due to ” genuine religious beliefs ”. But the department said it couldn’t determine whether Bishop Sycamore had such beliefs.

The ODE concluded that Bishop Sycamore was not a school but “a way for students to play football against high school teams and potentially increase the chances of students playing football at the college level.”

“The cost of this dream for these students was not just the tuition fees charged to attend school,” the department said in its report on Friday. “The prize was the education that the students were entitled to receive.”

The department also noted that these schools are not under his supervision and do not require his approval, and that it does not have the power under state law to sanction Bishop Sycamore.

The changes recommended by the ODE included amending state law to allow the department to monitor whether the hundreds of schools claiming to be unlicensed and non-tax-funded meet the more relaxed minimum standards for this category and to require corrective action if necessary.

Copyright 2021 WWSB. All rights reserved.

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As misinformation about COVID spreads in Louisiana, officials fear it could harm other childhood vaccines https://odessasem.com/as-misinformation-about-covid-spreads-in-louisiana-officials-fear-it-could-harm-other-childhood-vaccines/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 17:40:23 +0000 https://odessasem.com/as-misinformation-about-covid-spreads-in-louisiana-officials-fear-it-could-harm-other-childhood-vaccines/ During the delta’s surge of the summer, Dr. Mark Kline watched the intensive care unit at the New Orleans Children’s Hospital fill up with patients, some under a year old. Some who died. As the hospital’s chief medical officer, he has become a tough voice on Twitter, urging the public to take it seriously the […]]]>

During the delta’s surge of the summer, Dr. Mark Kline watched the intensive care unit at the New Orleans Children’s Hospital fill up with patients, some under a year old. Some who died.

As the hospital’s chief medical officer, he has become a tough voice on Twitter, urging the public to take it seriously the number of pediatric bodies of the pandemic and get vaccinated.

But instead, Louisiana’s vaccination rates have stagnated. And in children from 5 to 11 years old, only 5% received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine as of Dec. 1 – one of the lowest rates in the country, and a figure Kline called “pathetic.”

At the same time, the effort to vaccinate children against COVID-19 sparked a political battle in Louisiana – particularly just before Governor John Bel Edwards COVID-19 vaccines announced would be added to the list of compulsory vaccines for school-aged children. But pediatricians and state officials fear that a threat looming beyond the current pandemic looms.

“The threat to vaccinations in general right now is out of reach,” Kline said.

Kline is concerned that the same misinformation that fuels skepticism and politicization about the COVID-19 vaccine will spread and ultimately undermine confidence in all vaccines. If that happens and fewer children receive the regular immunization schedule, he said a host of illnesses could reappear.

“Are we going to go back to a time when we have children in this country dying of measles and paralyzed from polio?” Kline asked. “I’m not trying to be dramatic about this, but the ramifications are potentially huge. Epidemics of diphtheria again, paralytic polio in infants.

Blocking vaccinations during the pandemic

Louisiana law currently requires seven vaccines for a multitude of educational settings, ranging from kindergarten and kindergarten to grade 12 up to university level.

The state tends to lag behind national averages for childhood vaccines, but then surpasses national averages when children enter kindergarten and are required to show proof of their vaccination or exemption, Dr Joseph said. Kanter, head of public health.

Immunization rates also vary widely from parish to parish and tend to be higher in public schools than in private schools. For the 2019 to 2020 school year, vaccination rates in private kindergarten schools ranged from 69% in Saint-Bernard parish to 100% in Assomption. For most parishes, vaccination rates in public schools were in the 1990s.

These figures are crucial because the vaccination rates required for herd immunity are high, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics: for measles, it is 95%; for polio, it’s 80%. Estimates for COVID-19 range from 70% to 85%.

But in July, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a report warning of a dramatic drop in childhood vaccinations at the start of the pandemic.

The report blamed missed doctor’s appointments due to loss of health care coverage or financial hardship. He noted a drop of 11.7 million doses of non-influenza childhood vaccines across the country in 2020 compared to 2019.

Louisiana may have been hit harder than the national average, according to data from the Department of Health.

It found that children who turned 2 in 2020 had an 89.9% vaccination rate for at least one dose of the MMR vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps and rubella. That’s lower than the U.S. average of 92.8% in 2020, and lower than Louisiana’s 2019 rate of 94.6%.

More recent data shows flu shots in Louisiana are declining even in 2021. The state counted 762,552 flu shots in 2019, 772,001 in 2020 and only 573,343 in 2021, according to data provided by the ministry. of Health.

Other factors could play a role in these numbers, said Dr. Rachel Chatters, a pediatrician from Lake Charles and chief of the Louisiana section of the American Academy of Pediatrics, particularly the hurricanes that ravaged the southern part of the country. Status in 2020. But data shows children in Louisiana are at risk for epidemics.

Chatters said pediatricians statewide are working to keep children up to date on their immunizations, but it’s a catch-up game.

Anti-vaccine activists in Louisiana

Anti-vaccine misinformation has taken a new place in state policy at a recent hearing of the House Health and Welfare Committee, when Attorney General Jeff Landry Robert F. Kennedy Jr., one of the country’s most famous anti-vaccine campaigners who has been discredited for spreading misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines and other injections.

The hearing centered on the Louisiana Department of Health’s plan to include fully approved COVID-19 vaccines by the United States Food and Drug Administration in the regular childhood immunization schedule required for schools, although state law allows broad exemptions for religious, medical or philosophical reasons. .

In a largely symbolic gesture, a majority of committee members voted against the rule, and a week later Edwards announced it would go into effect.

For now, that means only children 16 and older will need to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or provide a letter of exemption for the 2022 school year. Kline said he supports the rule, as does Dr. Joseph Bocchini – a pediatric infectious disease specialist in Louisiana since 1977.

“There is no doubt that school mandates have been a critical part of the success of our immunization program in the United States,” said Bocchini, also vice president of the Louisiana section of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

But the meeting went beyond a discussion of the requirement. It included a lengthy presentation by Kennedy, accompanied by posters, alleging a host of false claims about the COVID-19 vaccine. Kline watched.

“The lies were coming so quickly that even though I was taking notes, I could barely keep up. It was like one per minute, ”Kline said. “I really thought it was embarrassing and shameful for our condition.”

The presentation summarized how anti-vaccine campaigners are raising objections and concerns about their merit or not, he said.

Kanter – who was called to testify nearly two hours after the meeting began – said it was of particular concern that Kennedy was placed “center stage.” He said Kennedy’s presentation had “chosen” data to make it appear factual.

“If you look at this individual and his background, he’s done the exact same thing with countless vaccines. It has been at the center of myths and misinformation about other vaccines that have really hurt families, ”Kanter said.

Kennedy is the founder of Children’s Health Defense, a group that promotes misinformation about vaccines and their links to autism, among other things – claims vigorously rejected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Autism Society of America, who declares straightforwardly that “there has never been any credible scientific or medical evidence linking vaccinations to autism.”

During the committee hearing, the slides of Kennedy’s presentation were tweeted by Health Freedom Louisiana. The private organization is the leading state-level organization fighting against COVID-19 vaccination mandates and public health measures, including mask requirements.

Since the start of the pandemic, the group has worked on a series of bills aimed at restricting vaccination mandates and advanced, unproven vaccine safety claims during previous committee hearings. A review of his Facebook page shows that his influence has increased. It had 5,112 subscribers in August 2020 and now has more than 13,000. Health Freedom Louisiana did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

On Twitter, the group is pushing the hashtag #fireKanter, in reference to the public health officer.

The group also re-tweeted Dr. Robert Malone, a scientist who helped create mRNA technology and recently repeated misinformation about COVID vaccines, including that they could make infections worse.

Malone was also guest of Landry’s during the committee hearing, and he wrote that he, Kennedy and Landry – the most powerful Republican in the state – had strategized on how to tackle the COVID-19 vaccine mandates.

“COVID has catalyzed the anti-vaccine and anti-science movement,” said Kline, who added that the movement has “become a central part of the anti-government movement.”

Kline said this creates a threat far beyond the immediate pandemic.

“It must be perhaps the lowest point in modern American medicine and public health history. I cannot think of a lower point in our history,” he said.

Chatters said she was trying to avoid the politicization of vaccines.

“I want to have scientific conversations about vaccinations, and I want to answer really legitimate questions about the vaccines themselves,” she said.

She is concerned that including COVID-19 vaccines in the immunization schedule may decrease the need for all childhood vaccinations.

Kanter said it was too early to say whether or to what extent vaccinations in general are affected by COVID skepticism, vaccine campaigners and misinformation, particularly on social media.

But Chatters said she had already seen evidence of decreased uptake of other vaccines.

“I worry a lot about this,” she said. “I can tell from the number of flu shots I have given this year that this number is much less. And I attribute some of that to the conversations people can have around vaccines in general. “

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School examined after ESPN rash a ‘scam’, says Ohio https://odessasem.com/school-examined-after-espn-rash-a-scam-says-ohio/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 23:06:20 +0000 https://odessasem.com/school-examined-after-espn-rash-a-scam-says-ohio/ COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio school whose legitimacy came under scrutiny after its allegedly top-tier soccer team was beaten in an ESPN televised game also failed to live up to its bill : It turned out to be “a scam,” according to an investigation by the Ohio Department of Education. Republican Gov. Mike DeWine […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio school whose legitimacy came under scrutiny after its allegedly top-tier soccer team was beaten in an ESPN televised game also failed to live up to its bill : It turned out to be “a scam,” according to an investigation by the Ohio Department of Education.

Republican Gov. Mike DeWine said he is asking the attorney general and other officials to determine whether any laws were broken by what claimed to be Bishop Sycamore High School in the Columbus area. DeWine also said he would work with state education officials and lawmakers to adopt the changes recommended by the department to avoid a repeat of the situation.

“Ohio families should be able to count that our schools educate students and not just exist in name as a vehicle for high school sports,” DeWine said in a written statement Friday.

The state has found no evidence that Bishop Sycamore enrolled multiple students this year and concluded that he did not meet minimum standards, including for academic offerings and student safety, according to the investigation. ODE. launched after the team’s 58-0 televised loss at the Florida-based central IMG Academy in August.

Bishop Sycamore’s report filed with the ministry for that school year listed only one student enrolled and listed his physical address as a house in a residential neighborhood.

In a call with a department official last month, Bishop Sycamore administrator Andre Peterson described his program as a way to gain more visibility for football players who were struggling to get into the clubs. colleges, according to the ODE report.

Messages requesting comment were left in Peterson on Saturday by phone and through the school’s email address. In previous comments reported by USA TODAY Sports, Peterson had denied that there had been a “scam” at the unbalanced football game or at the school, saying it helped players hoping to compete in college.

He identified himself with the ODE as a “chartered, non-tax-funded school,” a category which is largely outside the oversight of the ministry and which allows some typical operating systems to be bypassed due to ” deeply held religious beliefs ”. But the department said it couldn’t determine whether Bishop Sycamore had such beliefs.

ODE concluded that Bishop Sycamore was not a school but “a way for students to play football against high school teams and potentially increase the chances of students playing football at the college level.”

“The cost of this dream for these students was not just the tuition fees charged to attend school,” the department said in its report on Friday. “The prize was the education that the students were entitled to receive.”

The department also noted that these schools are not under his supervision and do not require his approval, and that it does not have the power under state law to sanction Bishop Sycamore.

The changes recommended by the ODE included amending state law to allow the department to monitor whether the hundreds of schools claiming to be unlicensed and tax-funded schools meet more relaxed minimum standards for this category and to require corrective action if necessary.

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Maple Run Unified School District Community Meeting With Group Of Consultants Canceled Due To Suspected Threats | News https://odessasem.com/maple-run-unified-school-district-community-meeting-with-group-of-consultants-canceled-due-to-suspected-threats-news/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 02:00:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/maple-run-unified-school-district-community-meeting-with-group-of-consultants-canceled-due-to-suspected-threats-news/ ST ALBANS CITY – A school district notice canceled a Thursday night meeting between community members and the Maple Run School District over “threats” and alleged security concerns. The notice, which was posted on the Maple Run Unified School District webpage, was also announced at Wednesday’s MRUSD board meeting. The release regarding the cancellation was […]]]>

ST ALBANS CITY – A school district notice canceled a Thursday night meeting between community members and the Maple Run School District over “threats” and alleged security concerns. The notice, which was posted on the Maple Run Unified School District webpage, was also announced at Wednesday’s MRUSD board meeting.

The release regarding the cancellation was drafted by Partners in Restorative Change and posted on the MRUSD website early Thursday morning. He referred to a memo released Dec. 2 by MRUSD, and said community reaction to the memo prompted the group to reconsider his arrival.

“Due to the unrest in the community, those of us on the design team decided to reschedule the community conversation,” the statement said. “We have spoken three times since last Monday about the holiday memo and the impact of harsh online posts that resulted from it. We had no idea this memo was coming out. The ‘storm’ language used in some posts to describe how the forum would be disrupted. This language and negative assumptions made about others have raised concerns about the potential for violence. ”

Thursday’s meeting was scheduled in response to the spread of a racist meme that made its way around Bellows Free Academy St. Albans earlier this year via the AirDrop smartphone app, according to MRUSD Superintendent Bill Kimball. The subsequent investigation into the meme did not identify a sender of the text, but the event sparked district action and a demonstration of solidarity from the BFA community on October 8.

Many online have called Thursday’s meeting announcement a “trip of guilt” and “distraction.” But Kimball said the meeting, in his eyes, was a potentially abundant opportunity to hear and listen to the needs, wants and concerns of community members. The meeting was supposed to include small discussion groups and allow community members to voice their concerns about equity and inclusion in the district.

“The purpose of this forum is twofold: one, to create the conditions for everyone’s voice to be heard and respected, and two, to elevate shared community values ​​so that disagreements can lead to growth and positive change,” said the press release. “We believe real conversations across the lines of difference are possible. We believe Vermonters want to bridge the growing gaps that often divide us … However, given the high level of anger and stress in response to the memo and For the safety of everyone, we are suspending this conversation today and will postpone it. “

The note was issued on December 2 to MRUSD staff, directing staff not to decorate public schools using religious holiday decorations or hold school holiday gatherings. Kimball later clarified that teaching one religion as opposed to teaching one religion was allowed, as long as one holiday or religion did not take precedence over another.

In the statement, Partners in Restorative Change said the organization plans to regroup and reschedule an event with MRUSD after the New Year.

“There is work to be done to heal as a community and we look forward to doing it with you,” they said. “We imagine that this will be a very difficult decision for some of you and a relief for others. It was not an easy decision for us to make. Let’s continue to work together so that we can have these necessary conversations. This community is worth it. “

When asked for comment, Superintendent Bill Kimball could not be reached on Thursday.

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Navy to begin separation treatment for sailors refusing COVID-19 vaccination https://odessasem.com/navy-to-begin-separation-treatment-for-sailors-refusing-covid-19-vaccination/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 15:58:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/navy-to-begin-separation-treatment-for-sailors-refusing-covid-19-vaccination/ Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jackson Adkins, of Evans, Ga., Assigned to the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) Media Department, receives a COVID-19 vaccine at the McCormick Gym aboard the base Naval Navy in Norfolk, Va. April 8, 2021 (U.S. Navy photo) The Navy can now begin to separate active-duty sailors who refuse to be vaccinated […]]]>

Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jackson Adkins, of Evans, Ga., Assigned to the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) Media Department, receives a COVID-19 vaccine at the McCormick Gym aboard the base Naval Navy in Norfolk, Va. April 8, 2021 (U.S. Navy photo)

The Navy can now begin to separate active-duty sailors who refuse to be vaccinated against COVID-19, according to Navy guidelines released Wednesday.
Active-duty sailors who refused to be vaccinated were to be separated if they continued to refuse, according to previous guidelines, but commanders were unable to process the separations until further clarification was received. included in Wednesday’s NAVADMIN.

Sailors who can retire or separate on or before June 1 will be able to do so through an expedited process instead of an administrative separation process, according to NAVADMIN. These sailors will receive an honorable discharge unless there are extenuating circumstances.

Seafarers who are not eligible for retirement or separation before June 1 will be treated for administrative separation as soon as possible on the basis of fault.

Those with less than six years of service will receive an honorable discharge and will not appear before an administrative separation commission or a commission of inquiry.

Sailors with more than six years of service will go to an administrative separation board, where they cannot receive at least a general discharge, which limits certain post-military benefits, including funding for education.

However, sailors can request instead to forgo their boards and be separated with an honorable discharge, according to NAVADMIN.

Seafarers who are separated due to a vaccine refusal will not be eligible for the involuntary separation allowance, according to the guidelines. Those who have a service obligation by receiving education funds through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps or other scholarship or by attending the Naval Academy will be required to reimburse their tuition fees.

While NAVADMIN lists June 1 as the separation date for those who have refused the vaccine, there is no deadline for when the fleet will be 100 percent vaccinated, except for those who are exempt, Rear Admiral James Waters III, director of military personnel, plans and policy said during a media call.

Sailors who have decided to get vaccinated but missed the Nov. 28 deadline to be fully vaccinated could still face administrative repercussions, Waters said. These sailors will have their cases treated individually by the vice-adm. John Nowell Jr. of the COVID Consolidated Disposition Authority (CDA).

“Let me be clear from the start. We want every sailor to receive the vaccine and stay in the Navy, ”Waters said. “And if a sailor is successful, we will honor that and do all we can to hold him back.”

Sailors received advice on the vaccine’s value and advice from medical professionals, Waters said. The Navy also used social media to encourage vaccination.

The majority of the Navy received the vaccine and met the deadline, said MyNavyHR Senior Fleet Commander Wes Koshoffer.

While there is no official data on why some sailors continue to refuse, Koshoffer said that in general it falls into two camps: those who are hesitant about the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine. and those with religious beliefs against vaccinations.

Despite these concerns, it’s important to note that mandatory vaccinations are not new to the Navy, he said. Vaccination warrants date back to 1848, USNI News previously reported.

The fleet must be fully vaccinated, aside from exemptions, in order to fulfill the Navy’s mission, he said.

Those who are exempt from the vaccine, for medical or administrative reasons, will have their positions limited because they will not be able to perform certain aspects of the mission without being protected from COVID-19, Koshoffer said.

Those separated for refusing the vaccine are greeted with respect, Waters said. They are labeled as “a member of the navy refusing the vaccine” to prevent them from being thrown away with a scarlet letter.

The Navy is not the first branch of the military to begin separating those who refuse the vaccine. The Air Force separated 27 airmen for not having obeyed the vaccination mandate, The Washington Post reported. Last week, the Navy removed the senior executive from the USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81) for refusing to be vaccinated.

Although the military as a whole will lose personnel who do not meet the mandate, it is important to maintain the number relative to the size of the military and the number of layoffs that occur on an annual basis of departures to the retirement and those who do not re-enlist, Pentagon press secretary John Kirby said at a press conference Tuesday.

“So in terms of preparation, our interest is to make sure that we get a vaccination as close to 100% as possible so that the force can be protected,” Kirby said. “That’s the worry.”

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