Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 17:33:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 Bartlesville Radio »News» Services Held for Former Bartlesville City Manager https://odessasem.com/bartlesville-radio-news-services-held-for-former-bartlesville-city-manager/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 17:31:18 +0000 https://odessasem.com/bartlesville-radio-news-services-held-for-former-bartlesville-city-manager/ Memorial services are held for former Bartlesville Town Manager Ed Gordon. The First Baptist Church in Bartlesville was the site where services were held on Tuesday mornings for former Bartlesville City Manager Ed Gordon. Gordon’s sons, Caleb and David, presided over the funeral. Caleb says the best way to honor his father is to preach […]]]>

Memorial services are held for former Bartlesville Town Manager Ed Gordon.

The First Baptist Church in Bartlesville was the site where services were held on Tuesday mornings for former Bartlesville City Manager Ed Gordon.

Gordon’s sons, Caleb and David, presided over the funeral. Caleb says the best way to honor his father is to preach the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ. He says his father wouldn’t want his service to be for him, but rather for the king.

Caleb asked those in attendance to think about their eternity with Christ and whether they have been redeemed by the blood of a Savior. He asked if Christ has redeemed you and reconciled to himself and covered your account with his blood.

Singing during the service was Aaron Vaughn and Benjamin Bender. Interment followed at White Rose Cemetery in Bartlesville.

Ed Gordon was born in Bay City, Texas on August 4, 1948. Gordon attended school until grade nine in Sweeney, Texas. He moved to Bartlesville with his family as a teenager and graduated from Bartlesville College High School in 1966.

After graduating from high school, Gordon worked for City Service Oil Company until they moved to Tulsa. Gordon then worked as an apprentice electrician with Chuck Brown, owner of Brown’s Electric in Bartlesville where he obtained his journeyman electrician license.

On July 31, 1970, he and Janie Lawrence married at Labadie Heights Baptist Church in Bartlesville and were quickly inducted into the United States Army shortly thereafter.

Gordon attended Oklahoma State University in Stillwater until he transferred to Bartlesville Wesleyan College where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Religious Education in 1975. He attended Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary in Memphis, Tennessee.

After the seminary, Gordon moved to Wyoming to do missionary work in a new coal mining community, which became the town of Wright, Wyoming. Over the next seven years, Gordon worked as Director of the Wright Water & Sewer District and as Superintendent of Construction at Great Planes Development. He also worked with Virg’s Electric as a Journeyman Electrician – as well as being a pastor of the Wright Baptist Church. Meanwhile, he and Janie welcomed their sons Caleb and David into their lives.

Gordon and his family returned to Bartlesville in 1984, where he again partnered with Chuck Brown and operated Brown & Gordon and Locke Supply, where he worked until he was hired by the Town of Bartlesville in 1991.

Gordon began his career with the Town of Bartlesville as a Wastewater Supervisor and was promoted to Director of Public Works in 2000. He was appointed City Manager in 2006, retiring after 27 years of service on August 1. 2018.

Gordon has been the pastor since 1975 and has been currently pastor of Trinity Baptist Church since 1992. He was predeceased by his wife Janie Gordon and granddaughter Grace Gordon and he is survived by his sister Linda Barnes and his family from Arkansas, his two sons Caleb Gordon and David Gordon and their wives Jamie Gordon and Katie Gordon and six grandchildren Hannah, Gabe, Austin, Noah, Carter and Tucker, all of Bartlesville.


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From Kenya to Mississippi: teacher dreams of being an engineer – Magnolia State Live https://odessasem.com/from-kenya-to-mississippi-teacher-dreams-of-being-an-engineer-magnolia-state-live/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:32:34 +0000 https://odessasem.com/from-kenya-to-mississippi-teacher-dreams-of-being-an-engineer-magnolia-state-live/ Cyprian Ng’etich, a native of Kenya turned teacher from Mississippi, has always had his head in the clouds. With his childhood home near a hospital and an airstrip built by foreign missionaries, small planes came and went often. From time to time, government officials would arrive by helicopter to tour the area. As far back […]]]>

Cyprian Ng’etich, a native of Kenya turned teacher from Mississippi, has always had his head in the clouds.

With his childhood home near a hospital and an airstrip built by foreign missionaries, small planes came and went often. From time to time, government officials would arrive by helicopter to tour the area.

As far back as he can remember, Ng’etich has always been fascinated by “any object that flies”. The desire to build, design or fly these objects once supported him.

“When I was in high school, I sometimes had a tendency to lose my concentration. So I had a photo in front of my desk of a jet fighter, ”Ng’etich said. “Anytime I felt I was a little demotivated, I would just open up the office, look at this and instantly get some motivation. “

Despite growing up with one eye raised to the sky, Ng’etich had never set foot on a plane before coming to the United States in 2014, a moment he had dreamed of.

To date, his trip to America is the only time he has flown.

“I had never seen such a big plane in my life until we boarded,” Ng’etich said. “I could just feel this happiness, this joy of flying in a Boeing plane for the first time.”

Ng’etich fell asleep a few hours after the flight started and woke up several hours later to a marvelous view – a blanket of massive clouds outside his window, glowing gold in the morning sunlight. on the United Kingdom.

From the UK, he flew to Dallas, Texas, and finally to Monroe, Louisiana, where he began his studies at Grambling State University.

FROM THE RIFT VALLEY TO THE BLUE MOUNTAIN

Ng’etich’s trip from Bomet, a town in Kenya’s Rift Valley Province, to Blue Mountain College is an interesting story.

He attended the Mother of the Apostles minor seminary in Eldoret, Kenya, for high school, where he learned to speak English and Swahili in addition to his native language, Kalenjin.

In 2014, two years after graduating from high school, Ng’etich arrived in the United States.

He spent a single semester studying at Grambling State University in Louisiana before transferring to the Vicksburg campus of Hinds Community College. While at Hinds, he began training for cross country, running at Vicksburg National Military Park.

Towards the end of 2017, he attended a cross-country race at Choctaw Trails in Clinton, where he ran the race as a ‘unattached’ runner, meaning he was not affiliated with any school. .

There, he met Blue Mountain College cross country coach Phillip Laney, who offered him the chance to tour the Blue Mountain campus.

The small town atmosphere of the college charmed Ng’etich.

By the end of the following week, he had initiated his transfer to Blue Mountain College.

“I feel like it was a matter of God,” Ng’etich said.

BECOME MISSISSIPPIEN

Even before arriving in America, Ng’etich had consumed American, even southern, culture.

“I already knew about country music,” Ng’etich said. “It’s the kind of music I love to listen to.”

He grew up listening to “Coat of Many Colors” by Dolly Parton and “Coward of the County” by Kenny Rogers.

“When I listen to music, I will look for the message,” Ng’etich said.

His favorite track is “Humble and Kind” by Tim McGraw, a song whose title and message Ng’etich strives to embody.

He also enjoys gospel music, often listening to K-Love on the radio while driving.

A struggle for Ng’etich was to adapt to the Mississippi climate.

Coming from Bomet, where the temperature typically hovers between 50 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit year-round, northeast of the Mississippi, where the temperature steadily drops below 30 degrees in winter and above 90 degrees in summer, has been a tough adjustment.

“Over time, I was able to adapt, especially with the cold,” said Ng’etich. “Because I don’t like the cold. I am a warm person. So with the cold it was a challenge trying to adjust.

Being active in sports and running helped him cope with climate change, but it wasn’t the only thing he had to adapt to.

While there isn’t a huge difference between the types of food Africans and Americans eat, there are differences in the way the food is prepared, in the spices, and in the cooking methods.

He enjoys most of the dishes he’s tried in the South, but by default orders a burger if there’s nothing else on the menu that’s particularly appealing.

“I KNEW I HAVE THE TALENT”

Ng’etich’s first salary in the United States did not come from a job, but from a pencil.

During his second week in the United States, Ng’etich showed some of his artwork to a man who was fixing his laptop. The man was so impressed that he asked Ng’etich to draw a portrait of his granddaughter.

The man paid Ng’etich for the portrait; Ng’etich used the money to pay for the repair of his laptop.

“After that, I felt something inside me that pushed me to do more,” said Ng’etich.

From that day on, Ng’etich invested more time and money in his art. He bought some materials and now draws on a daily basis.

“I knew I had the talent when I was 8,” said Ng’etich. “But back in Kenya, most people don’t appreciate talent. They tell you ‘Go to school’. Find a good career. Find a job and get married and so on. I didn’t really find more support with my art until I came to the United States.

Ng’etich specializes in pencil portraits and hyperrealistic drawings.

Most of the pieces produced by Ng’etich are orders. He has made a hundred since 2014.

But prints and original versions of his art are also currently for sale at Relics Antique Marketplace in Tupelo and Rip Jax Mercantile in Ripley. They include portraits of Elvis Presley, Nelson Mandela, and William Faulkner, among others.

A website is in the works, but Ng’etich is promoting his work through Facebook and Instagram at the moment.

A MATHEMATICS TEACHER WHO DREAMS OF BEING AN AEROSPACE ENGINEER

Although he loves to draw, Ng’etich’s future is not on paper, but in the sky.

Growing up, Ng’etich always wanted to be an aerospace engineer. But he felt he had to consider the most logical steps to build his career.

So he started teaching eighth grade math at the East Union Attendance Center, a subject that fits his future career plans.

As a teacher, Ng’etich also follows in the footsteps of his father, Anthony Kipngetich Rutto. Rutto was an English teacher in Mathematics and Religious Studies in Grades 5-8 at several schools around Bomet.

Ng’etich graduated from Blue Mountain College in December 2020 with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and a minor in secondary education, which earned him a place as a teacher at East Union.

The 2021-22 school year is his first as a full-time teacher, and it’s been amazing, he said.

Having moved to Mississippi from outside the country, Ng’etich said his students, who called him “Mr. Cyp ”, are curious and want to know more about him.

“This is an opportunity and I am so blessed to be among them, being their math teacher,” said Ng’etich. “I love their wit and that the majority of them, if not all, are ready every time they come to class wanting to learn.

Ng’etich is not only a teacher, but he is also the head coach of the East Union Archery Team. While attending Blue Mountain, he joined the archery team in 2019. Although he only competed for a year, he had the knack for it and was part of a group that competed at regional, state and national levels.

Ng’etich said he was grateful to work for a school administration that has been patient with the visa transition.

“The school was so gracious. They waited for me, ”Ng’etich said. “When I received my papers, they said ‘Welcome’. It’s something that I really enjoyed being at East Union.

At the moment, Ng’etich is here on an optional practical training visa. In January, he will seek a two-year extension available to students who have graduated in science, technology, engineering and math.

At 29, Ng’etich doesn’t see age as a problem in reaching his goals. He always looks to the future. And up to.

“If you’ve got a longing inside you that’s still burning,” he said, “I feel like this thing isn’t going to stop until you satisfy it.”


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Nicolas Cascio | Obituaries | Republic-Times https://odessasem.com/nicolas-cascio-obituaries-republic-times/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 00:16:29 +0000 https://odessasem.com/nicolas-cascio-obituaries-republic-times/ Nicholas Cascio, 90, of Valmeyer, formerly of Bonita, Calif., Died on December 31, 2021 in St. Louis. He was born on April 9, 1931 in Detroit. Nicholas was a member of St. Mary’s Church in Valmeyer, the Knights of Columbus Council # 13840, the American Legion Post 901, and the California Landscape Contractors Association. Nicholas […]]]>

Nicholas Cascio, 90, of Valmeyer, formerly of Bonita, Calif., Died on December 31, 2021 in St. Louis. He was born on April 9, 1931 in Detroit.

Nicholas was a member of St. Mary’s Church in Valmeyer, the Knights of Columbus Council # 13840, the American Legion Post 901, and the California Landscape Contractors Association. Nicholas was also a veteran of the United States Navy.

He is survived by his wife Anna Rose Cascio (née Strassell; children Nicholas (Heidi) Cascio, Christina (Brian) Coy, Joseph (Karin) Cascio, Angela (David) Atkinson, Michael (Elizabeth) Cascio and Andrew Cascio; grandchildren children Steven (Jenna) Coy, Amberly (Darren) Sullivan, Collin (Alexandra) Cascio, Brady (Kristen) Cascio, Isabella Cascio, Amy Cascio, Liliana Cascio, Nathaniel Atkinson, Analeisa Atkinson, Rosemarie Atkinson, Scarlett Cascio and Grant Cascio; back – grandchildren Landon Sullivan, Harper Sullivan, Hinley Sullivan, Emris Coy and River Coy.

He is predeceased by his parents Antonio and Serafina (née Bommarito) Cascio and his siblings Miriam “Rose” Matranga, Ninfa “Eva” Matranga, Anthony Badall and Josephina Saputo.

Visitations will be held from 9 a.m. until service on January 7 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Valmeyer. The rosary will be recited at 10:15 a.m.

The funeral will be celebrated at 10:30 am on January 7 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Valmeyer, with Father Linus Umoren CM officiating and Father John Kizhakedan concelebrating.

Interment will follow at Ss. Pierre and Paul Cemetery in Waterloo.

As a sympathy, the family prefers commemorative contributions to: St. Meinrad Seminary, 200 Hill Dr., St. Meinrad, Ind .; or Mundelein Seminary, 1000 E. Maple Ave., Mundelein; or a local veterans association

Arrangements with the Quernheim funeral home

User-friendly printing, PDF and email


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Top Religion Stories in 2021 – LA Faith Community Sees Changes – Los Angeles Sentinel | Los Angeles Sentry https://odessasem.com/top-religion-stories-in-2021-la-faith-community-sees-changes-los-angeles-sentinel-los-angeles-sentry/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 08:08:16 +0000 https://odessasem.com/top-religion-stories-in-2021-la-faith-community-sees-changes-los-angeles-sentinel-los-angeles-sentry/ Best Religion Stories in 2021 – LA Faith Community Sees Changes Apostle Frederick KC Price (courtesy photo) The Los Angeles faith community has had another tumultuous year in 2021 while maintaining its faith in the goodness of God. As in 2020, churches and ministries have faced the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in campus closures, […]]]>

Best Religion Stories in 2021 – LA Faith Community Sees Changes

Apostle Frederick KC Price (courtesy photo)

The Los Angeles faith community has had another tumultuous year in 2021 while maintaining its faith in the goodness of God. As in 2020, churches and ministries have faced the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in campus closures, reduced donations and the deaths of many parishioners.

But a light has appeared with the distribution of vaccines to fight the virus as well as the implementation of protocols to decrease the spread of the disease. As a result, some ministries have reopened for in-person worship and have resumed some outreach services to help those in need.

The year also featured new faces in the great pulpits, another woman elected AME Bishop and the passing of many giants of the faith, who paved the way for others to excel in spreading the gospel. The following is a list of the main stories covered in the LA Sentinel Religion section.

February – Apostle Frederick KC Passport: The founder of the world-famous Crenshaw Christian Center has died of complications from COVID-19 at the age of 89. The mega-church builder led an international ministry that first spread through television, radio and books, and into the 21st century, through various social media platforms including Facebook, YouTube Live, AppleTV, ROKU, and Amazon FireTV. His television program Ever Growth Faith (EIF), which debuted in 1978, is one of the longest continuous Christian education programs on television.

Pastor Ken Walden (Courtesy photo)

March – Walden appointed Pastor Holman UMC: Rev. Dr. Ken Walden was previously the President of Gammon Theological Seminary in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as lead churches in California, Michigan, and North Carolina. Author of all three books, he received his MA from the Duke Divinity School, his Doctorate in Ministry from the Graduate Theological Foundation, and his Masters and Doctorate from the Claremont School of Theology.

Father Anthony Bozeman (Courtesy photo)

April – Bozeman appointed to the Catholic Church of the Transfiguration: Father Anthony Bozeman is the first priestly head of the Church of the Transfiguration since 2014. His appointment will help the congregation to further establish itself as a Black Catholic Church. Before becoming a priest, he served 16 years in the military. Since his ordination in 2000, Bozeman has served in Philadelphia, Washington DC, and New Orleans before being transferred to Transfiguration in January 2021.

Madeline Thompson (photo by Richard Nichols)

June – Thompson, the last original singer in the parish, dies: Talented, stylish and creative singer Madeline Thompson has passed away at the age of 78. The last original member of the Clara Ward Singers, Thompson joined the legendary group in 1960 and extended their fame for decades after the death of their famous namesake. Originally from Philadelphia, she was known for her portrayal of “Traveling Shoes,” which she performed while dancing on the stage or in the aisles of the shrine.

July – Mega-churches reopen for worship: City of Refuge, Faithful Central Bible Church, and West Angeles Church of God in Christ all resumed in-person worship services on Sunday, July 4. They are joining the Greater Ebenezer Baptist Missionary Church, which reopened on Sunday June 6. worship complements the virtual services each ministry sponsors through the web, Facebook Live, and YouTube.

Bishop Francine Brookins (Courtesy photo)

July – Brookins elected Bishop AME: Reverend Francine A. Brookins, Esq., Was elected on 141st bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church during the 51st General Conference held July 6-10. Brookins, the pastor of Bethel AME Church in Fontana, is the fifth woman to be elected to the AME episcopal level. She follows in the footsteps of her late father, the Right Reverend H. Hartford Brookins, who served as Bishop of AME for decades. She was assigned to the 18e Episcopal district, which covers Lesotho, Swaziland, Botswana and part of Mozambique in Africa.

Reverend Dr. Solomon L. Drake (file photo)

August – Dr Solomon Drake passes: Drake, pastor emeritus of the Grand Ebenezer Baptist Missionary Church, died on August 18 at the age of 90. He served at Grand Ebenezer for almost 34 years. During his tenure, he led the members in the expansion of the building, the purchase of additional properties, the opening of a nursery school and the creation of a state-of-the-art library. In addition, part of South Denker Avenue has been designated “Pastor Drake Square” by the City of Los Angeles. Prior to his ministerial career, he played professional baseball for the Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies.

Pastor Darrell Wesley (Courtesy photo)

Aug – Wesley assigned to Phillips Temple CME – Reverend Darrell J. Wesley has been appointed senior pastor of the Phillips Temple Methodist Christian Episcopal Church by Presiding Prelate Bishop Paul AG Stewart. A former pastor of Amos Temple CME in Riverside, Wesley is a retired writer and captain in the US Navy. He received his BA and MA from Christian University in Abilene, as well as an MA in Sacred Theology from Yale Divinity School; Doctor of Ministry from United Theological Seminary and Ph.D. degree from Claremont Graduate University.

Missionary Lillie Benbow Jackson (Cora J. Fossett / LA Sentinel)

August – Celebrating the Life of Missionary Lillie Benbow Jackson – The community celebrated the life of District Missionary Lillie Benbow Jackson on August 27-28. She was well known in South Los Angeles for leading the 88e The food program of the Holy Temple of God in Christ Church for many years, which distributes fresh vegetables and groceries every Friday. Accomplished organist, she played for 88e Temple and for the Youth Choir of the First Jurisdiction of Southern California. She also co-chaired the jurisdiction’s Youth Sunshine Band, served as Chief Chaplain of the Women’s Department Light District. Daughter of the late Bishop Bennie Robert Benbow, missionary Jackson attributed her spirit of giving to “generational blessings”. During the Sentinel interview, she said, “I’m never going to retire because I’m motivated and if God sends you, you can make it happen. I believe I am chosen for this job.

Bishop Carl Bean (file photo)

September – Archbishop Carl Bean succumbs: Bean, a pioneering AIDS activist, pioneer of the LGBTQ Church movement and international advocate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people, died on September 7. He was 77 years old. Bean was well known in Los Angeles for having established the Unity Fellowship Church of Christ (UFC) in 1982 and implemented the Minority AIDS Project (MAP) in 1985, the first such organization which began at a time when the disease was relatively new.

Bishop Charles Blake and Pastor Charles Blake II (photo by Rickey Brown)

November – Blake II is appointed co-pastor of West Angeles: Presiding Bishop Emeritus Charles E. Blake has announced the elevation of his son, Elder Charles Blake II, as co-pastor. The appointment was a collaboration between Bishop Blake, Jurisdictional Bishop Joe Louis Ealy and the West Angeles Board of Trustees. Previously, Elder Charles was assistant pastor and director of community relations in West Angeles. A graduate of Oral Robert University, he obtained his master’s degree in theology from the Interfaith Theological Center.


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FCC senior pastor says happy to be back home https://odessasem.com/fcc-senior-pastor-says-happy-to-be-back-home/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 20:27:27 +0000 https://odessasem.com/fcc-senior-pastor-says-happy-to-be-back-home/ Becoming the Senior Minister of First Christian Church was a kind of homecoming for Reverend Beth Thomason, as well as the fulfillment of a lifelong dream. “When I was in high school I said I was going to be a pastor,” Thomason said. “I had a wonderful youth minister the whole time I was in […]]]>

Becoming the Senior Minister of First Christian Church was a kind of homecoming for Reverend Beth Thomason, as well as the fulfillment of a lifelong dream.

“When I was in high school I said I was going to be a pastor,” Thomason said. “I had a wonderful youth minister the whole time I was in the youth group and felt like that was the call I had.”

Thomason grew up in Homewood and graduated from Homewood High School in 1984. She attended the University of Montevallo and earned a degree in theater. Her first career was as a teacher at Parker High School where she taught public speaking and theater for five years.

The summer between high school and college, Thomason worked at Hargis Christian Retreat and met her future husband, Tim. They got married while she was in Montevallo. Tim had grown up attending First Christian Church and Beth had previously served as a volunteer youth minister there. They worked together at Hargis Christian Retreat and later got married.

“I was a member of this church and my husband is a life member of this church,” Thomason said. “When we got married, I transferred my members to this congregation. I was a teacher and I was the youth godfather at the time.

While in her role as volunteer youth minister, Thomason casually mentioned to the associate minister that if she had no other job, she could be in church working with youth all the time.

“He turned around and handed me a catalog of the seminar,” she said. “Within a year, I had resigned my teaching position and the congregation assigned me to attend seminary.

She quit her teaching job and began to explore her call to ministry, attending Lexington Theological Seminary, where she received her MA in Divinity and was ordained to the FCC in 1999.

For the next 20 years, Thomason served in churches in the Huntsville and Madison areas. In 2020, the family returned to Birmingham after she became the new FCC Chief Minister.

“FCC ordained me to ministry, but I immediately went to serve at FCC Huntsville and served there for 12 years as minister of youth,” she said. “I then served for nine years as a solo pastor at Madison Christian Church before coming home.”

“I feel like teaching really prepared me for the ministry. I love teens and spent my first 12 years of youth ministry, ”she said. “Teaching was really part of this ministry journey. Not as a side trip, but an integral part of their trip.

FCC has ministered to the Birmingham community for over 147 years and now has two women ministers: Thomason and Associate Minister Reverend Robin Blakemore. Thomason said being called back to the ministry at FCC was a homecoming for her and her family.

“It is not something that many ministers have the opportunity to experience,” she said. “It is the church that nurtured and helped shape my faith, so it is a sacred privilege to be able to lead them in ministry.”

When Thomas started as senior minister on May 1, 2020, she was unable to present her sermons to the congregation in person due to the pandemic lockdown.

“I couldn’t really meet my congregation face to face,” she said. “It was the hardest thing that ever happened to me in the ministry, to start a ministry in a church where it was almost a year before I met people. “

The church had to adapt to the circumstances and raised funds for equipment so they could broadcast live services. In the beginning, the services were filmed on iPhones and compiled into a computer program. Then the shrine was revamped to include monitors and technology to live streaming services.

Thomason said they did not record the service in the shrine because it looked so empty and large, but instead filmed in the church library, filmed communion at the table in the garden of prayer and during prayer time they would create voiceovers and show visual effects.

“We wanted to be able to broadcast live until we could come back and do live services in the shrine,” Thomas said. “We started broadcasting live from the shrine at Christmas, so it’s been over a year, and we continue to do so now.”

As a theater and public speaking graduate, Thomason said she used to speak to an audience or a congregation of people, so she had to change the way she presented her sermons.

Looking for a silver lining to the pandemic, Thomason said: “If you can call it a gift that came from not being able to be together, people started to understand that we had to move forward so that we can be together. The church is still the church if we can be physically inside the building.

FCC had its first in-person service on Easter Sunday 2021. It’s the church’s highest holy day and it was even more emotional for everyone to come together.

The Thomasons found a home in Irondale which they renovated and hoped to move in during the holidays. The couple have two daughters: Celia, who lives with her husband and daughter in Mineral Wells, Texas; and Sami, 20, who is part of the FAC audiovisual team.

In her spare time Thomason enjoys hiking and has said this is where she feels closest to God. She also enjoys the theater and looks forward to seeing performances in community theaters around Birmingham.


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Reverend Monsignor William David Bonczewski, North Jackson, Ohio Obituary https://odessasem.com/reverend-monsignor-william-david-bonczewski-north-jackson-ohio-obituary/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 19:41:37 +0000 https://odessasem.com/reverend-monsignor-william-david-bonczewski-north-jackson-ohio-obituary/ NORTH JACKSON, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – Reverend Monsignor William “Bill” David Bonczewski, Jr., 73, of Youngstown, passed away on Wednesday, December 22, 2021 at Mercy Health-St Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown, Ohio. He was born August 16, 1948 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, the son of Mary Ellis and William Bonczewski. Mgr. Bill received a master’s degree in theology […]]]>

NORTH JACKSON, Ohio (MyValleyTributes) – Reverend Monsignor William “Bill” David Bonczewski, Jr., 73, of Youngstown, passed away on Wednesday, December 22, 2021 at Mercy Health-St Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown, Ohio.

He was born August 16, 1948 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, the son of Mary Ellis and William Bonczewski.

Mgr. Bill received a master’s degree in theology from the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, completed seminary at the Notre-Dame du Liban Maronite Seminary in Washington DC, and was ordained a priest on May 29, 1976. He was pastor of the Maronite Catholic churches in Ohio, Pennsylvania. , West Virginia, Michigan, Utah and New York over a period of 45 years. He spent 23 years as Rector at the National Shrine of Our Lady of Lebanon, North Jackson, Ohio (1980 – 2003), where Pope John Paul II conferred on him the title of Monsignor and was elevated by the Archbishop Francis Zayek in 1991.

Mgr. Bill’s gentle spirit, warm smile, love for everyone he met and constant prayer was an inspiration to everyone who knew him. He was devoted to his priestly mission at the service of the Church and her flock. Bishop Bill was always incredibly generous in time and with the few possessions he owned, and he welcomed everyone to meet their needs. He gave what he had to the stranger, whether it was to eat or drink. He visited the sick in their homes and hospitals; he visited the prisoners and gave them all hope. As a seminarian, he received an Award from the Army Chaplains Association for Outstanding Service at Walter Reed Military Hospital for seven years of ministry to wounded soldiers during the Vietnam War.

As much as he lived his faith, Mgr. Bill was motivated by his love for the Catholic Church and the Maronite tradition of which he was a part. He was very proud of his two Lebanese and Polish heritage. He will tell us how he once told Pope John Paul II that he was a “Polish Maronite” and the face of Saint John Paul II lit up with surprise.

Mgr. Bill was known for his love of fun, the Three Stooges, and for bringing people together for ice cream. He had a sharp wit and a talent for storytelling, which often ended with everyone laughing, nothing more than his characteristic belly laugh. He also loved the nature and the simplicity of small farms. He frequently visited the Cooks Forest in the woods of eastern Pennsylvania, as well as the small Amish towns of Ohio.

Mgr. Bill is survived by his brother, Peter and his wife Mary Bonczewski and his sister, Jeanne Marie and her husband, Jim Calko; in addition, “Unc” also had six nieces and nephews and 10 great-nieces and nephews.

The viewing for the public will take place on Tuesday, December 28, 2021, from 12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., in the presence of the family from 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., at the Basilica and National Shrine of Our Lady of Lebanon, 2759 N Lipkey Road, North Jackson, with a Ginazz service which will be held at 6:00 p.m.

A Divine Liturgy will be held on Wednesday, December 29, 2021 at 10:00 a.m. at the Basilica and National Shrine of Our Lady of Lebanon 2759 N Lipkey Road, North Jackson, with His Excellency A. Elias Zaidan Bishop of the Eparchy of Our Lady of Lebanon as officiant .

There will also be a screening from 9:00 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., followed by a Divine Liturgy at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, December 30, 2021, at Saint Anthony / Saint George Church, 311 Park Avenue, Wilkes Barre, Pa., With His Excellency A. Elias Zaidan Bishop of the Eparchy of Our Lady of Lebanon as officiant.

Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania.

Due to the ongoing pandemic, the family suggests that masks or face coverings be worn for those present who call out or services for your protection and theirs.

The arrangements have been entrusted to the professional care of the Rossi & Santucci Funeral Home, 4221 Market Street, Boardman.

In lieu of flowers, people are encouraged to donate to the Basilica and National Shrine of Our Lady of Lebanon, 2759 N Lipkey Road, North Jackson, Ohio 44451 or to the Maronite Monastery of the Sacred Heart (Portland, Oregon) .

To send flowers to the family or to plant a tree in memory of the Rev. Mgr. William David “Bill” Bonczewski, please visit our flower shop.

A TV Tribute will air on Sunday, December 26 at the following approximate times: 8:58 a.m. on FOX and 9:58 p.m. on MyYTV.


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Investigator calls on reformist rabbinical group to update code of ethics https://odessasem.com/investigator-calls-on-reformist-rabbinical-group-to-update-code-of-ethics/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 22:20:29 +0000 https://odessasem.com/investigator-calls-on-reformist-rabbinical-group-to-update-code-of-ethics/ (RNS) – The Rabbinical Association of the Reform Movement has released an 84-page report written by an independent law firm detailing the revisions it recommends the association make in its code of ethics to better prevent and repent of sexual abuse in its ranks. The report by the female-based, female-led law firm Alcalaw is one […]]]>

(RNS) – The Rabbinical Association of the Reform Movement has released an 84-page report written by an independent law firm detailing the revisions it recommends the association make in its code of ethics to better prevent and repent of sexual abuse in its ranks.

The report by the female-based, female-led law firm Alcalaw is one of three investigations the reform movement has undertaken this year in response to a spate of high-profile revelations of sexual misconduct within its ranks.

It spans 30 years since the 2,200-member Central Conference of American Rabbis first adopted a code of ethics. The CCAR is the ruling rabbinical organization of the Reform movement, the largest Jewish denomination in the United States, with some 850 affiliated congregations.


RELATED: Reform Jewish seminary report reveals 50 years of sexual misconduct


With the exception of two rabbis whose sexual misconduct has been widely reported, the review does not name anyone currently under review by the ethics committee or any allegations of rabbinical sexual misconduct prior to 1991.

The two nominated are Rabbi Sheldon Zimmerman, who served for two years as President of CCAR and later as President of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, and Rabbi Michael Cook, who has taught for years a compulsory New Testament course at the school’s Cincinnati campus. Cook died in March. Zimmerman, 79, was until the start of the academic year in residence at Temple Emanu-El in Dallas.

Allegations that Zimmerman assaulted a 17-year-old years ago were among the factors leading to the independent investigation. Previously, CCAR had reported Zimmerman’s two-year suspension due to unspecified “personal relationships” that it said violated his code of ethics. He was then reinstated.

The report notes that CCAR has since amended its code of ethics to require mention of when an ethics violation involves a minor.

The report found that many CCAR members are unfamiliar with the organization’s code of ethics and its multiple revisions, and recommended increasing education on the code.

He also suggested that the CCAR expand the sections of the code relating to violations involving minors and make certain notifications when potential criminal behavior involving a minor is reported.

Last month, the reform movement’s seminar, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, released its report, finding widespread sexual harassment and discrimination on the basis of sex and gender over the past five decades. The Union for Reform Judaism, which is the congregational arm of the movement, is also expected to release a report.


RELATED: As Reform Jews investigate themselves, toll of sexual abuse grows



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The best of local sports: fall 2021 https://odessasem.com/the-best-of-local-sports-fall-2021/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 23:35:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/the-best-of-local-sports-fall-2021/ MOOSIC, Pa. – In boys’ golf, North Pocono eldest Billy Pabst showed why he is the Greek god of golf for the Trojans with a 68 at Elkview Country Club to win the Bob Simons Classic. “It’s child’s play there. I mean a lot of the guys played really well. The conditions, I mean they […]]]>

MOOSIC, Pa. – In boys’ golf, North Pocono eldest Billy Pabst showed why he is the Greek god of golf for the Trojans with a 68 at Elkview Country Club to win the Bob Simons Classic.

“It’s child’s play there. I mean a lot of the guys played really well. The conditions, I mean they are soft. Playing Elkview and the greens being as fast as they are it’s always a challenge so, ”said Billy.

RELATED: North Pocono’s Billy Pabst Jr. shot a two under par 69, only to fall in the second hole of the “AAA” State Golf Championship playoffs. Pabst was 2nd.

The low scores continued on the Heritage Hills course one (-2) 69 finishing 2nd in the state in “3A” losing on the 2nd hole of the playoffs.

In women’s golf, Dunmore’s Ciera Toomey, Hannah Raab Warrior Run, Chloe Sipe Elk Lake and Gwen Powell North Pocono reached the United States and ended with another outstanding season.

The Cross Country scene for girls dominated by Blue Mountain senior Olivia Haas. The “2A” state champion ran 18:20 on the state course at Hershey, winning her 2nd state title of her career.

“Yeah, I’m very happy. I’m so happy to come here and defend my title. And it’s just a great way to end my senior season so I’m very happy,” said Olivia.

For the boys, Lewisburg and Hughesville won the state tag team titles. Jacob Hess was 3rd in “2A” for the Green Dragons in 16:05 and Caleb Kenyon 3rd for North Pocono in “3A” in 16:03.

RELATED: Haas Wins Individual Title, Hughesville, Lewisburg Boys Wins State Cross Country Tag Team Titles

In the women’s volleyball township, the District IV champion lost to the Académie du Sacré-Cœur in the semi-final “A”.

RELATED: Olivia Dorner Outperforms Karissa Ghigiarelli 6-4, 6-3 In PIAA Class 2A State Title

In women’s tennis, Wyoming Seminary won the “2A” tag team title. In the individual “2A” championship match was an instant classic between Karissa Ghigiarelli of Riverside and Olivia Dorner of South Williamsport. This mountain’s Mounted Police Queen was once again Dorner winning her 2nd State Championship 6-4, 6-3.

Lewisburg continued to dominate men’s football. The Green Dragons lost 1 short goal 1-0 to Quaker Valley in the “2A” State Final (5-4) on penalties.

In women’s football, southern Colombia, behind Loren Gehret, won the “A” state title 4-0 against Greensburg Central Catholic. Les Tigres 3rd title in 4 years.

RELATED: Southern Colombia Wins 3rd Women’s Football State Title in 4 Years

“The strength of our schedule and the teams we play at PHAC make our teams stronger and these girls are resilient and they work hard in training. I can’t say enough about them my coaches Jen and Erin – the best coaches in the world, ”said Derek Stine.

In women’s field hockey, Wyoming Seminary won their 4th straight “A” state title with a 6-0 victory over Oley Valley. It was the 10th state championship for Coach Klassner in the history of the school.

“Everyone’s emotions took over. Honestly, I have no words to say. It’s just great doing this as a family together. We all trust each other. I think that. it’s one of the most important things, it’s our Wyoming Seminary field hockey family I just think we went out today and wanted to win it all, ”Ella said.

RELATED: Wyoming Seminary Wins 4th Consecutive State Field Hockey Championship

Steve Lloyd Newswatch 16 Sports


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IDF arrests 4 suspects in deadly West Bank shooting – CBS17.com https://odessasem.com/idf-arrests-4-suspects-in-deadly-west-bank-shooting-cbs17-com/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 06:52:28 +0000 https://odessasem.com/idf-arrests-4-suspects-in-deadly-west-bank-shooting-cbs17-com/ Posted: Dec 19 2021 / 01:52 AM EST / Update: Dec 19 2021 / 01:52 AM EST JERUSALEM (AP) – The IDF said on Sunday that its forces apprehended four Palestinian suspects suspected of taking part in a deadly shootout in the occupied West Bank. In Thursday’s incident, at least one Palestinian gunman opened fire […]]]>

Posted:
Update:

JERUSALEM (AP) – The IDF said on Sunday that its forces apprehended four Palestinian suspects suspected of taking part in a deadly shootout in the occupied West Bank.

In Thursday’s incident, at least one Palestinian gunman opened fire on a car full of Jewish seminary students near an outpost in the West Bank settlement. Yehuda Dimentman, 25, was killed and two others were injured near Homesh, which is considered illegal by the Israeli government.

The army said the suspects were arrested in the village of Silat al-Haaretia in the northern West Bank, near Jenin, and “have been transferred to the security forces for further investigation and the weapon of the suspect who fired was captured “.

Israeli authorities did not immediately identify the suspects.

Israeli border police released a photo of a cache of assault rifles and ammunition that belonged to the suspects.

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett congratulated the security forces on the arrest, adding that “every terrorist should know that the State of Israel will settle the score with him.”

The developments come after weeks of escalating Israeli-Palestinian violence. Earlier this month, a Palestinian attacker stabbed and seriously injured an ultra-Orthodox Jew outside the Old City of Jerusalem. And just over a week before that, a Hamas activist opened fire in the Old City, killing an Israeli.

At the same time, settler violence against Palestinians has increased, especially in the northern West Bank.

Israel captured East Jerusalem and the West Bank in the 1967 Middle East War, and the territories are now home to more than 700,000 Israeli settlers. Most members of the international community view Israeli settlements as illegal obstacles to peace.

The Palestinians want East Jerusalem and the West Bank to be part of a future independent state.


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Equip by the Ministry | Cord magazine https://odessasem.com/equip-by-the-ministry-cord-magazine/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 16:04:24 +0000 https://odessasem.com/equip-by-the-ministry-cord-magazine/ When generous donors approached temple staff at First Baptist Church (FBC) about a large donation they wanted to make for a special project, Senior Pastor Joe Loughlin and Pastor of Education and Communications Evan Duncan began to dream. The church had recently implemented a team approach to preparing sermons. The FBC temple has two sites […]]]>


When generous donors approached temple staff at First Baptist Church (FBC) about a large donation they wanted to make for a special project, Senior Pastor Joe Loughlin and Pastor of Education and Communications Evan Duncan began to dream.

The church had recently implemented a team approach to preparing sermons. The FBC temple has two sites on its campus, and a commitment to present a live sermon in worship meant that two preachers were needed to preach the four weekly services in each location. While Loughlin and Duncan preach the majority of the sermons, Worship and Care Pastor David Goddard and Missions Minister Josh Flores Olvera also preach regularly. This preaching group began to prepare their sermons as a team.

Thanks to the new team approach, each team member preaches their own sermon, but with input from the rest of the team on illustrations, language and text comprehension. The FBC Temple is a growing church and each service includes several generations, genders, ethnicities, origins and experiences. With the opportunity offered by their donors and given their new model of sermon preparation, Loughlin and Duncan considered adding a seminary student as a resident preacher to their team. The Resident, they believed, could gain the necessary preaching experience while adding a useful perspective to their preaching team.

Interested in exploring this idea, Loughlin and Duncan turned to a place where they knew they could find a knowledgeable, mind-led seminary student: the Truett Seminary at Baylor University. After a meeting between the FBC Temple teams and Truett, the Truett Ministry Resident Program was born.

Part mentorship opportunity, part ministry internship, the Ministry Resident Program is designed to connect some of Truett’s most gifted and motivated students with ministry opportunities in the major partner churches of the Truett Church Network. (TCN). For students, the program offers invaluable hands-on experience and training to better equip them for ministry tasks in addition to providing mentoring opportunities and gaining experience on healthy church staff. Churches then have the opportunity to integrate the training of young ministers into their mission while receiving an additional part-time staff member.

“Jesus told us that the disciples are no greater than their teachers, but those who are well trained will be like their teachers. Transformative seminary education requires both classroom instruction and learning opportunities in dynamic ministry settings.

Todd D. Still, PhD,
Dean of Truett Seminary

Interested students pledge to invest 10 to 15 hours per week in church ministry while partner churches pledge at least $ 10,000 to the Truett Church Network to support this student’s work over the course of ‘one academic year. One hundred percent of this donation is given to the resident in the form of a scholarship.

After creating the Resident Ministry Program model with FBC Temple, the Truett Church Network shared the new program with a number of central Texas churches closely related to Truett. The Program quickly began to multiply.

Concord Missionary Baptist Church in Dallas and Primera Iglesia Bautista in Waco soon followed the FBC Temple as partner churches in the Ministry Resident Program.

Emmanuel Roldan, senior pastor at Primera, explained that over the past five years, many students at Truett have blessed his church in ways he never imagined, and the heart of the church has always been to provide tangible ways to bless them in return by equipping and sending them as they answer God’s call on their lives. The Truett Resident Program has brought together this desire to bless Truett’s students with the mechanism to do so as the church grows and needs ministers to lead the fellowship, discipling and equipping Primera members. .

“We believe that the ministry’s resident program will help us carry out our mission in a tangible way that will bless our students, devotees and the Waco community,” said Roldan.

Concord Church in Dallas first contacted Truett’s ministerial relations office for help filling several positions. During their discussions, Jack Bodenhamer, Deputy Director of Ministry Connections at Truett, shared with Charnay Parks, People and Culture Business Partner at Concord, the Truett Resident Program. After further visits with Truett administration, staff and students, Concord decided to jump into the Truett Resident Program with both feet.

“Our founding pastor, Dr. EK Bailey, is known as the preaching godfather of African American exhibitions,” said Aaron Moore, adult ministry pastor at Concord. “But, another component of Dr. Bailey’s legacy was his ability to train, train and reproduce pastors. During his tenure as Senior Pastor, Dr Bailey trained over 100 pastors who continued to lead their own congregations. The Resident Program gives us the blessed privilege of carrying on this legacy of growing disciples who are called to serve the local church.

“We believe that the ministry’s resident program will help us carry out our mission in a tangible way that will bless our students, devotees and the Waco community.”

Emmanuel Roldan, Senior Pastor at Primera Iglesia Bautista

These partner churches have high expectations of what the Truett Resident program will do in the life of the resident and in the life of their church.

“We hope that the Spirit continually shapes each resident to become a learned Shepherd,” said Moore. “We believe our partnership with Truett Seminary will help develop future pastors and spiritual leaders who are shaped and shaped by their work at Truett and Concord.”

Roldan adds that he hopes through this program, “every church member is challenged to ask questions about their particular calling. Important questions will be raised in the lives of church members as they see future ministers living their calling among them.

Each partner church will structure the residence according to the needs of the church and the donations of the Resident.

Primera recently called on Cintia Aguilar as a resident for the fall semester. Aguilar and her family worshiped and served at Primera while she was enrolled in Truett, so she knows the church well. Her work will focus on raising awareness in the community as she seeks to create opportunities for fellowship and partnerships with local nonprofit organizations while assisting in the pastoral care of the congregation.

After meeting with Truett’s administration, staff and students, Concord decided to hire not one, but two residents, Memory Jora and Marciel Whitehurst. Residence at Concord is designed to give their students experience in all areas of church life. Concord will provide access to a model ministry in one of the country’s leading African American churches, providing opportunities to work with children, students and adults in mission, worship, discipleship and evangelism. According to Moore, this access will help each resident shape their ecclesiology as they seek to develop their own personal philosophy of ministry. Moore hopes Concord will increasingly become a hub for training young ministers and their release to serve in historically African-American churches across the country.

“I have come to realize that effective discipleship and spiritual training are essential to my success and to my legacy as a ministry leader,” Whitehurst said. “Not only that, effective discipleship and spiritual training are needed to help others grow in their faith. Although I gain extensive practical experience, I look forward to leadership development. I think Concord is a great ministry to serve and to learn.

Jora hopes to grow spiritually, in wisdom and in discernment. She hopes “to come out of this experience by truly understanding what it means to work in the ministry and to dedicate her life to serving God and his creation.”

“I hope that any areas of weakness that I have will also be strengthened and that I will create lasting relationships with my Spiritual Leaders and Mentors.”

Just as church leaders initially envisioned, FBC Temple’s residency will focus on preaching. The church recently called Hannah Brown as its first resident. Brown will participate in weekly sermon development meetings with other staff pastors and preach monthly in several departments.

“I pray that our church will become a church that sends more and more Christian leaders into the world, and I look forward to seeing how the Spirit can speak through our Resident in our teaching meetings, our evaluations of. sermons and in the Resident’s own. preach, ”said Duncan of FBC Temple. “As news broke of Brown’s selection to be our resident, several young women have already approached her to express how seeing Hannah in this position opened their imaginations as to how God could use them as well as other women for the Kingdom. May the Spirit inspire all our imaginations in this way.

For his part, Brown, who hopes to continue pastoral ministry after graduation, said, “I hope this residency will equip me better for the ministry of the church, give me confidence in my preaching abilities. and leadership and will help me connect with passionate leadership and congregation. of the First Temple.

The Truett Resident program represents a huge and exciting opportunity for Truett Seminary. The program deepens the seminary partnership with vibrant local churches while simultaneously providing a high-level ministry experience for students called to serve the church. It is yet another way for Truett to accomplish his mission of equipping the women and men called by God for Kingdom ministry in and alongside the Church of Christ.

“Jesus told us that the disciples are no greater than their teachers, but those who are well trained will be like their teachers. Transformative seminary education requires both excellent classroom instruction and learning opportunities in healthy and vibrant ministry settings, ”said Todd D. Still, PhD, Seminary Dean. “The Truett Seminary Residency Program was initiated to give students and churches the opportunity to partner in the vital and dynamic work of ministerial training. Under the able and able leadership of the Office of Ministry Connections of Truett and the Truett Church Network, there is every reason to believe that the initial success of this new and necessary initiative is only the beginnings of a greater harvest. future. ”


To learn more about the Ministry Resident Program at Baylor’s Truett Seminary and how your church can get involved, visit www.baylor.edu/truett/residentprogram.



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