Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 11:38:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 AMERICA – The Bishops of Paraguay, Colombia and Venezuela gathered for their Plenary Assembly: synodality at the center https://odessasem.com/america-the-bishops-of-paraguay-colombia-and-venezuela-gathered-for-their-plenary-assembly-synodality-at-the-center/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 11:38:24 +0000 https://odessasem.com/america-the-bishops-of-paraguay-colombia-and-venezuela-gathered-for-their-plenary-assembly-synodality-at-the-center/ AMERICA – The Bishops of Paraguay, Colombia and Venezuela gathered for their Plenary Assembly: synodality at the center Bogota (Agenzia Fides) – The Plenary Assemblies of the Episcopal Conferences of Paraguay, Colombia and Venezuela will take place this week. From Monday July 4 to Wednesday July 6, the bishops of Paraguay will participate in a […]]]>

AMERICA – The Bishops of Paraguay, Colombia and Venezuela gathered for their Plenary Assembly: synodality at the center

Bogota (Agenzia Fides) – The Plenary Assemblies of the Episcopal Conferences of Paraguay, Colombia and Venezuela will take place this week. From Monday July 4 to Wednesday July 6, the bishops of Paraguay will participate in a spiritual retreat, which will be followed by the Ordinary General Assembly, from Wednesday afternoon July 6 to Friday July 8. The coordination of the spiritual retreat was entrusted to Mgr. Pierre Jubinville, bishop of San Pedro and vice-president of the episcopal conference. Among the issues addressed by the Assembly – informs the note sent to Agenzia Fides – are the Ecclesiastical Faculty of Theology, the report of the National Major Seminary, the process underway for the implementation of the Guidelines on the Ministry of Catechism and the Ministry of Acolyte and Reader for Women. The Bishops will also hear reports from the Ministry of Education and Human Mobility. On Friday, July 8, the plenary session will meet until 9:30 a.m., then it will move to the cathedral to participate in the imposition of the pallium given by Pope Francis to the Metropolitan Archbishop of Asunción.
The Plenary Assembly of the Colombian Episcopate will be held in Bogotá from July 4 to 8, which, as usual, will bring together all the archbishops and bishops of the country to reflect on important issues such as the social reality of the country and the pastoral work of the Colombian Church.
The Synod on Synodality will be the starting point and the center of reflection of this Assembly, during which the voices of all the regions of the country will be heard. The Bishops will receive the national summary of the synodal consultation, which took place in all the jurisdictions of the country, and will make their contributions to it. They will also reflect on the options of the Episcopal Conference of Colombia for the Jubilee of Redemption, in the year 2033. Also from July 4 to 8, the Venezuelan Episcopate will meet in its Ordinary Plenary Assembly, during which the National Summary of Contributions for the Synod on Synodality will be presented and other topics relevant to the life of the Church and society will be discussed.
Among them, synodality in the Venezuelan episcopate; synodality with the Venezuelan Conference of Religious and the National Conference of Laity; and the challenges after 15 years of Aparecida. The Assembly will begin on Monday, July 4, with Eucharistic Adoration led by Monsignor Mario del Valle Moronta Rodríguez, Bishop of San Cristóbal and First Vice President of CEV. Then Monsignor Jesús González de Zárate, Archbishop of Cumaná and President of the CEV, will inaugurate the events, which will last until June 8, when a press conference will be held before the celebration of the II National Pastoral Assembly, from July 8 to 10. (SL) (Agenzia Fides, 4/7/2022)


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Shia cleric survives assassination attempt in central Iran https://odessasem.com/shia-cleric-survives-assassination-attempt-in-central-iran/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 12:14:36 +0000 https://odessasem.com/shia-cleric-survives-assassination-attempt-in-central-iran/ A Shiite cleric was injured in an assassination attempt by a motorbike attacker in central Iran on Saturday as attacks on clerics spike in the country. Mohsen Akhavan, who is the congregational prayer imam at the Baqiyatallah Mosque in Isfahan, was shot dead and is now hospitalized. Akhavan, who holds the rank of cleric of […]]]>

A Shiite cleric was injured in an assassination attempt by a motorbike attacker in central Iran on Saturday as attacks on clerics spike in the country.

Mohsen Akhavan, who is the congregational prayer imam at the Baqiyatallah Mosque in Isfahan, was shot dead and is now hospitalized.

Akhavan, who holds the rank of cleric of hojatoleslam, was returning home after leading morning prayers when the attack happened.

Several Iranian clerics have recently been attacked by angry Iranians as rising prices and constant protests have led to a tense environment in the country.

In early June, the representative of Iran’s Supreme Leader in the central city of Isfahan, Yousef Tabatabaei-Nejad, was attacked by a young man carrying a knife. He is known for his annoying remarks about women and social freedoms, as well as his recent comments aimed at whitewashing the Iranian government’s decisions to end food subsidies, which led to a sudden spike in prices.

Earlier this year, a member of the Assembly of Scholars and Scholars at Qom Seminary, Mohammad Taghi Fazel Meybodi, said clerics and students at the seminary are avoiding their usual dress. for fear of being insulted in publicadding that the Iranian people have a negative view of the clergy and blame them for the current difficulties they are experiencing, including high prices and corruption.

Another well-known cleric, Mohammad-Reza Zaeri, also talked about the growing hatred and rancor towards the clergy in January, warning of an unfolding crisis in society.

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Visit to a family of Christian doctors https://odessasem.com/visit-to-a-family-of-christian-doctors/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 02:35:53 +0000 https://odessasem.com/visit-to-a-family-of-christian-doctors/ “My brother, who is 95 years old and retired long ago, still preaches in grassroots churches, testifying to God in good spirits,” said an elderly Christian doctor. On June 19, the pastor and staff members of Jiexi Church in Shima City, Zhangzhou, Fujian, visited the daughter-in-law of a former pastor who served in Shima Church […]]]>

“My brother, who is 95 years old and retired long ago, still preaches in grassroots churches, testifying to God in good spirits,” said an elderly Christian doctor.

On June 19, the pastor and staff members of Jiexi Church in Shima City, Zhangzhou, Fujian, visited the daughter-in-law of a former pastor who served in Shima Church and to his son, bringing a sample of a Jiexi Church history book (first draft) for them.

Jiang Meiling, director of the pediatric department of Fujian Medical University Hospital in Fuzhou, is the daughter-in-law of Reverend Ouyang Hou, with her son Ouyang Qiming as director of the hospital’s stomatology department. “As a graduate student, Qiming’s son is a surgeon at Union Medical College Hospital, he just gave birth to a son, my great-grandson. So I was promoted to great-grandson. grandma…” Jiang said happily.

“My father Jiang Tianhan, a devout Christian, was a famous Western doctor trained by Zhangzhou Gospel Hospital, appointed president and acting president of the hospital. My 95-year-old brother Jiang Junyu is now retired and once served as a pastor at Mochou Road Church after graduating from Nanjing Union Theological Seminary,” Jiang added.

“I also graduated from seminary,” said Reverend Ye Yi’neng of the Jiexi Church.

“Do you know my brother? Jiang asked.

“Yes, like when we studied theology in Nanjing, we practiced in churches in Nanjing every year, including Mochou Road Church,” Ye said.

“Born in Zhangzhou in 1927, after my father died, my brother was admitted to China’s most famous seminary at that time in Nanjing after graduating from middle school. Married in Nanjing, he was assigned as a teacher music at Nanjing 26 Middle School (Nanjing Foreign Language School now) with a good voice.In the choir of Mochou Road Church which reopened in late 1980, he retired to sing baritone, ordained pastor later,” Jiang said.

“Yes, I once heard him preach. He would occasionally show a written article with the topic and main points (outline) of the sermon in large letters, worrying that the congregation would not understand his Hokkien dialect. sermons, he also sometimes sang hymns or short songs, leading others to sing along, with a beautiful voice,” Ye recalled.

– Translated by Abigail Wu

探望欧阳侯牧师的儿媳蒋美龄大姐

Visit to a family of Christian doctors

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Hitting in the seminaries – a myth or a reality? https://odessasem.com/hitting-in-the-seminaries-a-myth-or-a-reality/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:54:47 +0000 https://odessasem.com/hitting-in-the-seminaries-a-myth-or-a-reality/ “It has become a norm to beat children in madrassahs, small children suffer at the hands of their teachers and some of them are severely beaten just because they are not performing,” says Abdur Rehman Hashmi, who runs a small Madrasah in Lahore. He continues further; “I make sure such incidents don’t happen in my […]]]>

“It has become a norm to beat children in madrassahs, small children suffer at the hands of their teachers and some of them are severely beaten just because they are not performing,” says Abdur Rehman Hashmi, who runs a small Madrasah in Lahore. He continues further; “I make sure such incidents don’t happen in my madrassah because madrassahs are supposed to provide you with a safe place and monitor it, I appointed Salman who keeps an eye on every teacher and how he is doing treats students who come to learn din. No doubt there are good madrasahs and good teachers, who provide you with a safe environment.

Beatings in Madrasahs are increasing day by day and there are many cases in different Madrasahs where no one is held accountable for committing such acts.

15-year-old Abdullah has a heartbreaking story to share. He recounts the incident when he was badly beaten by one of his teachers in Madrassah and had no one to save him except Allah. “I forgot to memorize my homework and the next day when I walked in I sat in front of my homeroom teacher he asked me to recite the part I was given as my homework, to which I told him that i couldn’t get ready due to a high fever but the way he answered broke me he took out the stick and started hitting me on the back he asked me to turn around which I did out of respect, but he wouldn’t stop. He kept hitting me and then asked me to open my hands and hit myself with the steel scales on my hands. It was painful , very painful”, Abdullah had tears in his eyes and after taking a long breath, he continued “It was painful, but I had so much respect for my teacher that I thought it was okay but it started to happen frequently and my teacher hit me on little things and all I could do was bear the pain in silence until what one fine day my mother saw me crying because of the pain and i told her, showed her my back and my parents finally decided to stop sending me to this madrassah, i don’t want to mention the name but it is a harsh reality that so many children suffer at the hands of their teachers.

Students are afraid to take the names of their teachers and especially their madrasahs because they fear that if they divulge the names they will have more problems. It is sad to see little children being threatened, beaten and beaten by Madrassah teachers when they have just come to learn from you a beautiful religion which teaches you peace and love. How on earth can these teachers set an example for the students who come to them? How can they teach them to be a better Muslim?

There are several homes that have such stories, but they are afraid to talk about them because the rigor they face from their teachers is such that they are afraid deep down. But then some parents justify it by saying that their child will learn from his mistakes and never repeat them. These people are the reason we as a society are failing. “The day we stand up together as a society and raise our voice against this issue of knocking in the madrassahs is the day we will all win. This must stop. It is a reality and we should not turn our face from it, we should defend little children who are afraid to talk about it, there should be a proper system in Madrassah and if something like this happens there should be have a punishment for such people. They deserve it,” says Abdul Rehman Hashmi.

Where in the world do we see children beaten so badly that they bleed? Where in the world do we see students so punished that they are asked to open their hands and the teacher can freely hit them? It gets so bad. This is not a myth but a reality and it must definitely stop. The sad truth is that only 10% of these cases are reported and many of these cases go unreported or uncovered due to fear of their teachers. That is why there are no statistics available on the number of children who suffer from it in the Madrassahs of Lahore.

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Jay Mule ministers in Native American churches https://odessasem.com/jay-mule-ministers-in-native-american-churches/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 17:00:20 +0000 https://odessasem.com/jay-mule-ministers-in-native-american-churches/ Jay Mule’s life is testimony that God uses those who dedicate their lives to Him, even when their very existence seems out of control. Mule, from Ardmore, was not brought up in a Christian home, but he had parents who took him and his younger brother to church. God called him to be saved when […]]]>

Jay Mule’s life is testimony that God uses those who dedicate their lives to Him, even when their very existence seems out of control.

Mule, from Ardmore, was not brought up in a Christian home, but he had parents who took him and his younger brother to church. God called him to be saved when he was 7 years old.

“As a child, I was fascinated by God and my new relationship with him,” Mule said. “However, upon entering adolescence, my spiritual life deteriorated and I experimented with all sorts of vices, especially alcohol.”

Consequently, his lifestyle got him into criminal activities and he was arrested many times.

“I would be sentenced by the court to various institutions for juvenile delinquency,” he said. “In addition to that, I was sent to Carter Seminary, a Federal Indian Residential School. Overall it was a positive experience, but it didn’t solve my problems. »

After high school, Mule ended up in several alcohol rehabs and was in and out of city and county jails. Eventually, he said, the lifestyle he led brought him to the end of his rope.

“I became so overwhelmed with hopelessness and hopelessness that I constantly thought about ending my life,” Mule admitted. “I knew all along that I was disobedient to God. I knew I was saved, but I just chose to ignore God’s call for me to repent.

As his life hit rock bottom, he made the decision to attend a church that reached out to him in times of need.

“I enjoyed my visit so much that I continued to attend even though I was still struggling spiritually,” he said. “One evening, while I was going out with some friends, I argued with them about whether God exists or not. As I defended the existence of God, I was convinced of my disobedience. The following night, I informed the church that I had made the decision to rededicate my life to the Lord.

Years later God called Mule to preach and he was ordained to the ministry in 2005. For 16 years he served as an evangelist in Indian Baptist churches and ministered throughout Indian country. For the past five years, he has served as pastor of Chief Cornerstone Church in Geary and concurrently serves as missions director for the Cheyenne Arapaho Association, tending to the spiritual needs of the Cheyenne and Arapaho churches.

Due to the decline of Indian churches, congregations and leadership in western Oklahoma, Mule said missions were the primary focus of his ministry.

“We hold vacation Bible schools and revivals,” he said. “We feed children at tribal gatherings and make ourselves available for all tribal activities. Most importantly, we are restarting churches that have closed and planting new ones (in Seiling and Hammon). »

Mule said they challenged themselves to go outside their borders and do missions. Prior to the COVID pandemic, they ran the vacation Bible school in Hollywood, Florida, First Seminole for four years.

“Our goal and our desire is to take a team to care for our Cheyenne and Arapaho relatives in Montana and Wyoming,” he said.

Mule said their greatest opportunity to reach the lost is through Powwow Bible Clubs.

“It’s a unique ministry that places us among the people, and in particular, it’s a chance to share the gospel with the unreached,” he said. “The Powwow Bible Club is a ministry that cares for children and youth attending any powwow or tribal gathering. Our goal is always to run a Vacation Bible School and make it an organization they can keep in touch with. However, due to a lack of manpower and resources, we are not always able to achieve everything. But anyway, we teach and serve for the duration of the powwow.

Mule noted that they are highly visible as they set up their teepee, wake-up tent and inflatables, and made cotton candy, snow cones and popcorn available to all. They also practice the tradition of tribal food where everyone is welcome to come and eat at their camp.

“After so many years, every powwow expects us to be there and enjoying what we’re doing,” Mule said. “That’s the main reason they allow us to come into the powwow circle to tell everyone why we’re here. We take advantage of these moments to share the Gospel with hundreds and sometimes thousands of people present. We even held our own powwow and shared the gospel with tribal nations across the country and across Canada.

Mule said his family consider themselves Powwows, which means they dance/sing and compete in Powwows all over the country.

“We are aware that we are ambassadors of the Lord and that we represent him wherever we go,” he said. “Therefore, we take advantage of these opportunities to share the wonderful gospel of Jesus Christ to the tribal nations.”

The Mule family consists of his wife, Toni Tsatoke-Mule, and his two daughters, Jaylee, 9, and Lily, 7.

Due to the generous giving of Oklahoma Baptists through the Cooperative Program, an incredible array of ministries are supported. This unified gift encourages fellowship with other believers around the world. Collectively, Oklahoma Baptists advance the gospel together.

Jay Mule is featured in the 2022 Missionary Prayer Guide for Oklahoma Baptists. To see more information, visit oklahomabaptists.org/cp.

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2022 MHSSCA High School Softball Team for Division 4 https://odessasem.com/2022-mhssca-high-school-softball-team-for-division-4/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 16:01:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/2022-mhssca-high-school-softball-team-for-division-4/ Unionville-Sebewaing continues to flex its softball muscles, winning its third straight Division 4 state title and fifth in Michigan’s last seven high school state tournaments. The Patriots, ranked No. 1 in the state in Division 4, ended the season with a 4-1 win Saturday over Ottawa Lake-Whiteford in the state finals at Michigan State University. […]]]>

Unionville-Sebewaing continues to flex its softball muscles, winning its third straight Division 4 state title and fifth in Michigan’s last seven high school state tournaments.

The Patriots, ranked No. 1 in the state in Division 4, ended the season with a 4-1 win Saturday over Ottawa Lake-Whiteford in the state finals at Michigan State University.

The United States extended its dominance to the Michigan High School Softball Coaches Association’s Division 4 all-state team, with four players named to the first team.

Pitcher Lacy Harris leads the way after pitching the Patriots in the 4-1 win over Whiteford. Harris, who had more than 20 wins and 200 strikeouts during the season, struck out nine in the state title win.

She is joined in the first team by teammates Olivia Jubar, Macy Reinhardt and Gabby Crumm.

Vice-champion Whiteford also placed four players in the first team: Aly VanBrandt, Berlynn Keller, Ambrelle Billau and Unity Nelson.

2022 MHSSCA D4 All-State Team

first team

FROM: Saige Flaugher, Hillman

FROM: Abbie Fowler, Holton

FROM: Rylee Scheurer, Portland St. Patrick

SS: Natalie Wandrie, Inland Lakes

SS: Olivia Mikowski, Glen Lake

SS: Lydia Meredith, Portland St. Patrick

SS: Payton Griffith, Mendon

SS: Aly VanBrandt, Whiteford

SS: Rachel Cairo, Southfield Christian

1B: Katelyn Pnacek, Coleman

1B: Olivia Jubar, Unionville-Sebewaing

1B: Kaitlin Nowicki, Town of Rogers

2B: Macy Reinhardt, Unionville-Sebewaing

2B: Alexis McCarty, River Valley

2B: Berlynn Keller, Whiteford

3B: Hannah Lynch, River Valley

3B: Ambrelle Billau, Whiteford

3B: Gianna Reed, Holton

C: Megan Postma, Rudyard

C: Kinzee Stockdale, Frankfurt

C: Paige Antcliff, Beal City

C: Gabby Crumm, Unionville-Sebewaing

P: Nicole Barbeau, Hillman

P: Sophie Wisniski, Onekama

P: Morgan Westall, Breckenridge

C: Macey Springer, River Valley

P: Nelson Unit, Whiteford

P: Carsyn Roehrig, Riverview Gabriel Richard

P: Laci Harris, Unionville-Sebewaing

P: Jayden Marlatt, Johannesburg-Lewiston

P: Mikaylyn Kenney, Pentwater

U: Makayla Kamyszek, Posen

University: Madison Miller, Coleman

U: Gwen Grosvenor, Decatur

U: Holland DeVries, Kalamazoo Christian

Honorable mention

FROM: Donna VanHolla, Norway

FROM: Faith Kline, Kalamazoo Christian

FROM: Jenna Gremel, Unionville-Sebewaing

FROM: Lizzie Storey, Pickford

FROM: Lizzy Romel, Posen

FROM: Carly Scheurer, Portland St. Patrick

FROM: Johanna Kubacki, Deckerville

SS: Anna Terwilliger, MP for the Sacred Heart

SS: Breanna Franks, Decatur

SS: Neveah Chaffee, Coleman

1B: Laura Bush, Pickford

1B: Ellery Garver, MP for Sacred Heart

2B: Hailey Hart, Onekama

2B: Izzy Smith, Mendon

3B: Brooklynn Orr, Rogers City

3B: Elley Johnson, Coleman

3B: Haley Hand, Riverview Gabriel Richard

3B: Maggie Koroleski, North Huron

C: Taylor Larson, Onaway

C: Kamryn Parlin, Athens

C: Rebekah Shoemaker, Morenci

C: Sarah Collins, Riverview Gabriel Richard

C: Grace Thompson, Holton

C: Kara Swan, Menton

P: Payton Manninen, Ishpeming

P: Karly Smith, Beal City

P: Lauren Schabes, Mendon

P: Maddy Anson, Orchard Lake St. Mary’s

P: Madison Brown, Pellston

P: Kelsey Quiggin, Mesick

P: Natalie Jones, MP for Sacred Heart

P: Cecilia Conforti, Decatur

P: Georgia Meyer, Marion

U: Kenzie Greene, Holton

U: Ally Coffey, Michigan Lutheran Seminary

If you want sports news from your local high school delivered to your inbox every day for free, Click here and sign up for one of our local sports newsletters.

AFTER

2022 Division 4 High School Softball Team

2022 Division 3 High School Softball Team

2022 Division 2 High School Softball All-State Team

2022 Division 1 High School Softball Team

Powerhouse Unionville-Sebewaing continues softball dynasty with eighth state title

Michigan-bound Madi Ramey lifts Allen Park to Division 1 softball state title

Stevensville Lakeshore ties record with Division 2 softball state title

Millington turns bad memories into good ones with Division 3 softball state title

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Cayuga County Property Transfers: June 19, 2022 | Folders https://odessasem.com/cayuga-county-property-transfers-june-19-2022-folders/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/cayuga-county-property-transfers-june-19-2022-folders/ The citizen staff Today’s transfers cover deeds registered with the Cayuga County Clerk’s Office from May 9-15: • Juan Otero, 27 Brookside Drive West, Harriman, to Trudy Ann Falter, 32 Seminary St., Auburn, property at 26-28 Seminary St., $77,500. Appraisal $62,600. • Matthew J. DeBois, 58 Lake Ave., Auburn, to Eileen M. Barry, 11 Brae […]]]>

The citizen staff

Today’s transfers cover deeds registered with the Cayuga County Clerk’s Office from May 9-15:

• Juan Otero, 27 Brookside Drive West, Harriman, to Trudy Ann Falter, 32 Seminary St., Auburn, property at 26-28 Seminary St., $77,500. Appraisal $62,600.

• Matthew J. DeBois, 58 Lake Ave., Auburn, to Eileen M. Barry, 11 Brae Ridge Road, Auburn, property at 58 Lake Ave., $130,000. Appraisal $65,900.

• Rebecca L. Smith, 94 Francis St., Auburn, to Joel Miglionica, 120 N. Hoopes Ave., Auburn, property at 120 N. Hoopes Ave., $1. Appraisal $139,000.

• Michael Bush, 10205 Slab City Road, Jordan, to Kayli Moore-Griffith, 213 Woodlawn Ave., Auburn, property at 31 Derby Ave., $39,500. Appraisal $51,600.

• Paul N. Gera and Lorraine A. Gera, 52 Oak St., Auburn, to Kathleen A. Preston and/or Thomas D. Gera, as co-trustees of the Paul and Lorraine Gera Irrevocable Trust (same address), owned at 52 Oak Street, $1. Appraisal $133,600.

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• Pamela J. Lockhart, 213 S. Seward Ave., Auburn, to Leon H. Defendorf and Heather A. Defendorf, 215 S. Seward Ave., Auburn, property at 211-213 and 215 S. Seward Ave., $1 . Appraisal $136,900.

• Robert J. Kenny, 56 Adams Ave., Auburn, and Jason R. Kenny, 126 Van Anden St., Auburn, to Jason R. Kenny (same address), property at 126 Van Anden St., $1. Appraisal $62,000.

• Robert W. Bench, 247 State St., Auburn, to Joseph Baliva, 8239 High St., Montezuma, property at 4 Derby Ave., $1. Appraisal $86,700.

• Linda J. Wood (alias Linda J. Gowen-Wood), 2412 Woodland Ave., Wantagh, to Linda J. Gowen-Wood (same address), as trustee of the Linda J. Gowen-Wood Living Trust, owned at 6182 Court Street, $0. Appraisal $151,084.

• Ashley Oliver, 9012 N. Seneca St., Weedsport, to Justin Daniel Kintzele, 2115 Townline Road, Moravia, property at 9012 N. Seneca St., $130,000. Appraisal $67,000.

• James and Colleen Gunsalus, 10371 Shortcut Road, Weedsport, to James L. Gunsalus (same address), property at 10371 Shortcut Road, $1. Appraisal $78,000.

• Jeffrey Good, Fort Myers, FL, to James Swagler and Debra D. Swagler, 6 Calloway Drive, Auburn, property at 3016 Pinfeather Place, $45,000. Appraisal $35,000.

• Michael Sawran and Shelley L. Sawran, 4799 W. Lake Road, Auburn, to Michael Boglione and Jamie L. Boglione (same address), part of 4799 W. Lake Road, $312,500. Appraisal $196,800.

• Katherine Stone (aka Katherine Elizabeth Pawloski), 1009 Stevens St., Genoa, to Donald A. Luoma, PO Box 11, Genoa, property at 1009 Stevens St., $130,000. Appraisal $159,000.

• Paul H. Bramble, 10757 Slayton Road, Weedsport, to Country Boy Hardware LLC, 2225 Emerson Road, Weedsport, property at 2525 W. Main St., $125,000. Appraisal $96,100.

• Jimmie W. Hall and Sandra L. Hall, 13074 State Route 34, Martville, to Laurie M. Holbrook (same address), property at 13074 and 13048 State Route 34. $0. Appraisal $67,900 and $31,000.

• Helen Prouty, 1063 Cortland Road, Groton, to Michael Prouty, PO Box 653, Ithaca, property at 13274 State Route 90.0$. Appraisal $65,000.

• Lorrie A. Emerson, as Administrator of the Estate of Leon Webster Darling II, 5220 Dresserville Road, Moravia, to Ross C. Lawton, 309 Clark St. Road, Cayuga, property at Hurley Drive, $5,000. Appraisal $7,700.

• TOTL Property LLC, PO Box 199, Penn Yan, at Milford Mast, Windsor, CO, property located at 121 and 132 Main St., $155,000. Appraisal $35,600 and $35,000.

• Patrick Smart, 3593 Rockefeller Road, Moravia, to Peter T. Curvin and Cristina N. Curvin, Crested Butte, CO, property at 3593 Rockefeller Road, $75,000. Appraisal $55,600.

• James E. Berry Jr. and Lisa A. Berry (aka Lisa A. Webster), 17 Silver Ave., Auburn, to Ellen P. Moran, Worcester, MA, property at 6 Melrose Parkway, $234,000. Appraisal $101,100.

• Timothy Charles Reid and Stephanie Reid, Marshfield, MA, to Deirdre Houston, as trustee of 212 Burtis Point Trust, 11 Elm Drive, Millbrook, property at 212 Burtis Point Road, $0. Appraisal $315,900.

• Jason M. Sheridan, The Grand Rehabilitation Facility, 32 Russell St., Chittenango, to Amy L. Sheridan, 31 Greene St., Oxford, property at 18 Shearin St., $1. Appraisal $110,000.

• Paul Hofmann and Holly Flagg, 3904 O’Neil Road, Auburn, to Eric T. Bostain and Elizabeth J. Bostain, San Diego, Calif., property at 3904-3905 O’Neil Road, $360,000. Appraisal $166,400.

• MMDI Properties LLC, PO Box 1037, Auburn, to Brent Lee VerHoeven, 96 Hamilton Ave., Auburn, and Jeffrey S. Piascik, 2766 Green St., Weedsport, property at 7319 Owasco Road, $150,000. Appraisal $92,500.

• Lee E. Willits and Constance M. Willits, Punta Gorda, FL, to Sarah Harding and Natalie Zauhar, 38 State St., Skaneateles, property at 6907 N. Glen Haven Road, $510,000. Appraisal $230,300.

• Angela A. Bergan, 150 E. Genesee St., Skaneateles, Kathleen Lapsley, Round Rock, TX, Suzanne Nangle, 2890 E. Lake Road, Skaneateles, James Bergan, 57 W. Genesee St., Skaneateles and Lisa Edmunds, 3881 Mandy Street, Auburn, to Angela A. Bergan (same address), property at 3188 Barrington Way, $1. Appraisal $200,000.

• Patricia S. Pysnack-Weaver, 23 Oak Drive, Union Springs, to Nathan R. Hoyser, 3210 Sunset Drive, Walworth, property at 23 Oak Drive, $195,000. Appraisal $161,200.

• 3W Properties LLC, 1470 Coral Drive, Farmington, to Jessica Guarino, 21 Center St., Union Springs, property at 21 Center St., $47,500. Appraisal $26,600.

• Matthew Loveless and Danielle Loveless, 5077 State Route 90, Cayuga, to Douglas R. Sochan and Kimberly G. Sochan, 5067 State Route 90, Cayuga, part of 5077 State Route 90, $0. Appraisal $457,600.

• Dean D. Cummins, 3125 State Route 370, Cato, at Austin Davis, 1948 County Route 11, Parish, property at 1734 Laxton Road, $85,000. Appraisal $49,400.

• Dennis A. Jaeger, Omaha, NE, to Shawn Decker, 7 S. Ramona Beach Road, Pulaski, property at State Route 38, $55,000. Appraisal $27,400.

• Helene Houghtaling, 13691 State Route 38, Martville, to Helene Houghtaling (same address) and April Houghtaling, 325 Nichols Road, Jefferson, property at 13691 State Route 38. $0. Appraisal $89,200.

• Michele R. Baldwin, PO Box 313, Skaneateles, to Kent M. Baldwin, PO Box 153, Fair Haven, property at 14520 Fancher Ave., $0. Appraisal $222,500.

• Bert G. Anson and Linda K. Anson, 14027 State Route 38, Sterling, to Linda K. Anson (same address), property at 14027 State Route 38. $0. Appraisal $198,600.

• Danielles of Sterling Inc., 14504 Teachout Road, Sterling, to Armington Road Properties LLC, 3784 Armington Road, Box 184, Palmyra, property at 14504 Teachout Road, $45,000. Appraisal $31,200.

• Eric Thompson and Darcy Thompson, 15065 King Road, Sterling, to Nicholas Grosso and Bridget Grosso, 882 Beach Road, Brewerton, property at 15479 McIntyre Road, $22,000. Appraisal $18,000.

• William E. Nies, William E. Pickard and Billee Jo Pickard, 1304 E. Lake Road, Summerhill, to Billy Jo Dowd, Dunnellon, FL, property at 1304 E. Lake Road, $35,000. Appraisal $55,323.

• Gayle J. Wyckoff, 8085 State Route 90, Montezuma, to Tracy Brennan (same address), Brandon S. Harris, 3876 Allen Road, Cato, and Alex J. Harris, 103 Crenshaw Court, Camillus, property at Lyons Road, 0 $. Appraisal $40,000.

• William E. Ryan, 549 Conlon Road, Lansing, Patricia A. Berry, 10256 State Route 90, Genoa, Donald E. Ryan, Diamond, OH, Carrie L. Ryan, as executor of the estate of John F Ryan, 12 King St., Homer and Michael J. Ryan, Edmond, OK, to Michael R. Crittenden Jr. and Lille L. Crittenden, 8 Buchanan Drive, Union Springs, property at 2641 State Route 34B, $125,000. Appraisal $120,400.

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Theologians must find new ways to express and share faith, Pope says https://odessasem.com/theologians-must-find-new-ways-to-express-and-share-faith-pope-says/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 20:09:18 +0000 https://odessasem.com/theologians-must-find-new-ways-to-express-and-share-faith-pope-says/ ROME — The Catholic Church needs theologians who know how to convey the truths of the faith in a way that speaks to people today, helps them live the faith in their daily lives, and inspires them to share the gospel with others, wrote Pope Francis. “The community needs the work of those who try […]]]>

ROME — The Catholic Church needs theologians who know how to convey the truths of the faith in a way that speaks to people today, helps them live the faith in their daily lives, and inspires them to share the gospel with others, wrote Pope Francis.

“The community needs the work of those who try to interpret the faith, to translate it and re-translate it, to make it comprehensible, to expound it in new words; it is a work that must always be redone, in each generation,” the pope told the staff of the Archdiocesan Seminary of Milan in a text given to them on June 17.


Seminary staff were in Rome as part of the 150th anniversary celebration of the seminary’s theological journal, which Pope Francis described as “a bit like a showcase, where a craftsman exhibits his work, and you can admire his creativity”.

“What has matured in the workshops of university classrooms, in the patient exercise of research and reflection, debate and dialogue, deserves to be shared and made accessible to others,” the pope said in his written text.

The Vatican press office said the pope gave his prepared text to seminary and newspaper staff, but did not provide any information about what he discussed with them.

In the text, the pope had written that the Church needs theologians who can “communicate the truths of the faith today, taking into account linguistic, social, cultural changes and competently using the media, without ever watering down , weaken or ‘virtualise'”. the contents.”

“The Church encourages and supports the effort to redefine the content of the faith in every age, in the dynamism of tradition,” he said. “That is why theological language must always be alive, dynamic, can only evolve and must work to make itself understood.”

Unfortunately, he says, “sometimes the sermons or catecheses that we hear are mostly composed of moralism and are not ‘theological’ enough, that is, capable of speaking to us about God and answering questions of meaning. which accompany people’s lives, and which we often do not have the courage to formulate openly.

To be of true service to the Church and its members, he said, theologians must “always keep in mind the connection between faith and life” and “cherish and communicate the joy of faith to the Lord Jesus”.

At the same time, he says, they must also have “a healthy restlessness, that quivering of the heart before the mystery of God. And we will know how to accompany others in the search as we come to know this joy and this concern. That is, the more ‘disciples’ we are.

To truly support evangelization today, the pope said, theology must know how and show others how to “dialogue with the world, with cultures and religions.”

“A theology that evangelizes is a theology nourished by dialogue and welcome,” he said. “Dialogue and the living memory of the testimony of the love and peace of Jesus Christ are the paths to follow to build together a future of justice, fraternity and peace for the whole human family.

Pope Francis also used his text to speak about the role of seminary personnel today in identifying and educating those with a vocation to the priesthood or religious life.

“Those called are not mushrooms that grow spontaneously,” he said. Each person is “an immense mystery” and comes with a range of personal experiences and a past shaped by family, community and parish.

“Seminarians and young people in formation, wrote the pope, should be able to learn more from your life than from your words; to be able to learn the docility of your obedience, the perseverance of your devotion, the generosity with the poor of your sobriety and availability and the paternity of your chaste and non-possessive affection.

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Prof. Paulraj Rayappa joins the priests of the Diocese of Salt Lake City; will be hospital chaplain https://odessasem.com/prof-paulraj-rayappa-joins-the-priests-of-the-diocese-of-salt-lake-city-will-be-hospital-chaplain/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 02:11:07 +0000 https://odessasem.com/prof-paulraj-rayappa-joins-the-priests-of-the-diocese-of-salt-lake-city-will-be-hospital-chaplain/ Friday, June 17, 2022 Courtesy picture + Expand Father Paulraj Rayappa By Laura Vallejo Intermountain Catholic SALT LAKE CITY — A Catholic by birth, Father Paulraj Rayappa was inspired by his parents to become a priest, the newest priest to come to the Diocese of Salt Lake City has said. Born in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, […]]]>

Friday, June 17, 2022

Courtesy picture

+ Expand

Father Paulraj Rayappa

By Laura Vallejo

Intermountain Catholic

SALT LAKE CITY — A Catholic by birth, Father Paulraj Rayappa was inspired by his parents to become a priest, the newest priest to come to the Diocese of Salt Lake City has said.

Born in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India, the youngest of four brothers and one sister, Fr. Rayappa entered the seminary immediately after graduating from high school.

“For 12 years, I did my training,” said Fr. Rayappa, who holds a Bachelor of Education from Krishna College of Education as well as a Bachelor of Civil Law from Sri Venkateswara University, Tiupathi, in India.

He was ordained a priest on April 18, 2004 by Bishop George Antonysamy for the Archdiocese of Madras Mylapore.

Being a priest is a blessing, he says. “I like to serve people in their spirituality.”

After his ordination, he served as assistant pastor of a parish in his archdiocese. He has also served as Executive Secretary to the Archbishop and Pastor of three different parishes, all in India.

“I have always had the desire to have different experiences in my ministry,” he said, recalling that his special missions have included being secretary of the archdiocesan commission for evangelization, executive member of the board of cemeteries archdiocesans, director of a matriculation school, member of the archdiocesan priests council and chaplain, among others.

This motivation to have different experiences led him to apply for ministry in the Diocese of Salt Lake City, where he arrived at the end of May.

“This is my first time leaving India,” the father said. Rayappa said, adding that he was impressed with the welcoming community in the diocese.

In the coming weeks, Fr. Rayappa expects to become more culturally acclimated to Utah and get to know the community better.

“Here is a totally different experience than India,” he said. “The community’s participation in the liturgy over the past few days has impressed me.”

When the new priest assignments take effect in August, Fr. Rayappa will serve as chaplain at the University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Huntsman Cancer Hospital. In the meantime, he assists Fr. Jorge Roldan Sanchez at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish in Salt Lake City.

“I want to walk together towards God with the community,” he said.

“Due to the many degrees that Fr. Rayappa has earned over the years from 1994 to 2017, we are confident that Fr. Rayappa will continue to build on the foundation laid by Saints Peter and Paul as he s speaks to a wide variety of people here in the Diocese of Salt Lake City,” said Fr. Ken Vialpando, Diocesan Vicar for Clergy.

Pr. Rayappa speaks Tamil, English, a little German and he is learning Spanish.

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Deepening discernment: at the heart of the newly instituted propaedeutic scene at Saint Paul Seminary – Newsroom https://odessasem.com/deepening-discernment-at-the-heart-of-the-newly-instituted-propaedeutic-scene-at-saint-paul-seminary-newsroom/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 15:36:44 +0000 https://odessasem.com/deepening-discernment-at-the-heart-of-the-newly-instituted-propaedeutic-scene-at-saint-paul-seminary-newsroom/ Nineteen young men in a family kitchen is a fascinating sight. And the sound. And smell. Sizzling bacon, sausages and eggs. A table sprinkled with oatmeal, cereal and fruit. And once in a while, a unified singing of a rock song from the 90s. But for the men of the “propaedeutic” new year of the […]]]>

Nineteen young men in a family kitchen is a fascinating sight. And the sound. And smell.

Sizzling bacon, sausages and eggs. A table sprinkled with oatmeal, cereal and fruit. And once in a while, a unified singing of a rock song from the 90s. But for the men of the “propaedeutic” new year of the Saint Paul Seminary, it is just another common breakfast after mass. daily.

This is a household. A family.

Some will go to the major seminary. Others will discern another vocation. Either way, they will have made a free and well-intentioned decision to do so, says the priest in charge of the program.

“With all the different voices in our society today, young people need to be quiet in some way, so they can hear the voice of God in their hearts and in their lives,” said Fr. John Floeder, director of humanities at the seminar. training and propaedeutic year.

“I don’t think I could find the words to describe how God works in each of our lives.”

James Semling, aspirant, Diocese of Helena, Montana

The world has changed a lot since Floeder was ordained a priest in 2007. He welcomes Pope Francis’ recent call for seminaries to provide an additional year of priesthood training. St. Paul’s Seminary was one of the first in North America to institute what some church leaders call a spiritual “detox.”

“I didn’t have the internet before I got to college, and Netflix was always a service where you got DVDs in the mail,” Floeder said. “So what these men face today is a very different world than the one I grew up in.”

Father John Floeder, director of human formation and the propaedeutic scene at St. Paul Seminary, addresses seminarians inside St. Mark’s Church in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Housed in St. Mark’s Church about a mile from St. Paul’s Seminary on St. Thomas’ campus, the men are distinctly different from major seminary life and have a different daily rhythm. The goal is to step back from the madness of the world and allow men to discern openly where God is calling them – whether to priesthood or married life.

“They need time and space to rediscover authentic love and connection with the Lord, and authentic love and connection with one another,” Floeder said.

One of the ways men receive this time and space is to abstain from technology. Phones and laptops are placed in the “computer lab”, which is open briefly once a week so the men can catch up with friends and family.

The rest of their free time, the men read, play board games, run group errands, sing music, and simply spend quality time together.

“As Americans, we think we know what freedom is – do whatever you want,” said seminarian Anthony Olmes of Helena Diocese. “In fact, taking things like our cell phones and laptops away and having a schedule where I have to wake up before 7 a.m. every day has brought a lot of [true] freedom. I have never experienced this in my life before.

The group attends a daily holy hour, morning prayer and mass. Their program also includes weekly community work, including ministry to underprivileged children in Minneapolis. Half of them help the Church of St. Stephen’s High School youth group on Friday nights; the other half goes to the Risen Christ for four hours every Wednesday to spend time with younger students.

Another source of growth, they say, has been their bi-weekly class sessions in the common area.

Once a week, St. Paul’s Seminary professor Dr. Bill Stevenson leads discussions on the classic literature of greats like Dante and Homer. Renowned catechist Jeff Cavins also comes once a week to teach the men what it means to be a disciple and guide them through the history of salvation. And Paul Ruff, the director of counseling services at the seminary, facilitates a process group and is available for individual counseling. Floeder has also invited special speakers like Father Josh Johnson from Ascension Press and “Ask Fr. the fame of Josh.

One theme is consistent across all of their classes: no grades.

“What makes the introductory year so different from direct entry to major seminary is that there just isn’t the same academic pressure,” Olmes said. “We just read books together and talk about them in our sessions. We really form ourselves as a whole person without this academic stress.

As the seminary’s inaugural foundation year draws to a close, its participants tend to be filled with a sense of inner peace about the next step in their vocational journey.

“I don’t think I could find the words to describe how God is working in each of our lives,” said James Semling of the Diocese of Helena, Montana.

Aspirants attend a daily holy hour, morning prayer and mass. Their program also includes weekly community work, including ministry to underprivileged children.

And while Floeder had some nerves about what the year would be like at the start, the growth and maturity he saw in the men under his care left him in awe, he said.

It is one more way for the Church to ensure good, strong and holy priests.

“Being able to lead this program and live as a spiritual father to these young men has filled me with a tremendous sense of hope,” Floeder said. “This program is really, I think, realizing what all of our hopes and dreams should be for what it is to be a priest and to serve in the Church.”

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