Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:24:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 SHA disputes whether seminar route changes ‘worked’ https://odessasem.com/sha-disputes-whether-seminar-route-changes-worked/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:24:35 +0000 https://odessasem.com/sha-disputes-whether-seminar-route-changes-worked/ The Seminary Hill Association sent a lengthy letter to City Manager Jim Parajon in which they disputed a recent analysis by transportation and environmental staff on whether the Seminary Road diet worked as intended. Earlier this fall, city officials released a study supporting their claim that the Seminary Road Complete Streets program primarily achieved its […]]]>

The Seminary Hill Association sent a lengthy letter to City Manager Jim Parajon in which they disputed a recent analysis by transportation and environmental staff on whether the Seminary Road diet worked as intended.

Earlier this fall, city officials released a study supporting their claim that the Seminary Road Complete Streets program primarily achieved its goals by making the roadway safer for all users.

The city council had voted in September 2019 to put Seminary Road on “diet”, reducing two lanes in each direction to one lane in each direction, a center turn lane and cycle lanes. The decision was controversial, to say the least.

In their official report more than two years after the road was repaved, city officials said:

  • Speeds decreased slightly but did not show a noticeable difference.
  • Traffic does not appear to be diverted to neighborhood streets, with one exception: vehicle volumes on Fort. Williams Parkway saw a two-way increase of 12-33%.
  • Peak travel times on Seminary Road have dropped from 35 to 60 seconds. Eastward reductions were slightly greater than westward shifts.
  • The number of cyclists on the road has increased. Pedestrian use decreased slightly.
  • The percentage of drivers driving over 35 mph on the road has dropped significantly.

The Seminary Hill Association represents more than 5,400 residents living in central Alexandria.

“The road diet project was poorly designed and received very little support from the most

affected by it. Since its implementation, it has failed to deliver on its promises and continues to be

highly unpopular. Most troubling for our members is that the post-project implementation

The evaluation document states that the project was very successful. It is not,” the SHA letter noted.

Among the SHA’s main complaints, the “before” period of traffic measurement was before the pandemic and the “after” period was during a time when most people were still working from home and traveling less. Additionally, Douglas MacArthur Elementary School was demolished and is being rebuilt – these students attend school next to Patrick Henry School on Taney Avenue.

“As of spring 2022, traffic volumes had still not returned to pre-COVID norms and there were numerous reports in the press that the work-from-home trend was continuing indefinitely,” SHA wrote. The city’s report noted that crashes have declined, but they’ve also declined citywide at a similar rate due to fewer cars on the road.

However, Hillary Orr, deputy director of transportation for the city of Alexandria, noted that city staff “delayed data collection until traffic volumes were more consistent with pre-war levels. pandemic. Over the months that volumes were collected, we saw traffic volumes in the city that were fairly consistent with 2019 levels.”

Also among the SHA’s complaints: The design of the roadway, in particular the medians installed for the safety of pedestrians which have been repeatedly struck by motorists since their installation. Repairs to medians and surrounding signage are at taxpayer expense.

“Although the medians have been hit on several occasions,” Orr said, “there is no evidence that the islands pose a serious safety hazard as there were no injuries resulting from these crashes, and most were more likely due to driver error.. However, the City has implemented new measures to make the islands more visible to motorists.

Additionally, Alexandria Fire Department officials told T&ES that they were unaware of any negative impacts on emergency response as a result of the pavement modifications.

While the overall speed of drivers on the carriageway has not decreased significantly (it remains around 34 mph), the number of speeding tickets – those that were the most dangerous – has decreased, according to T&ES.

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Residents protest Iran’s actions https://odessasem.com/residents-protest-irans-actions/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 07:54:28 +0000 https://odessasem.com/residents-protest-irans-actions/ A protest against the Islamic Republic of Iran is organized by Iranian Americans living in Turlock and Modesto. A local protest event is due to begin at 3 p.m. Sunday at the corner of Monte Vista Avenue and Countryside Drive in Turlock. According to a press release issued by the organizers of the event, the […]]]>

A protest against the Islamic Republic of Iran is organized by Iranian Americans living in Turlock and Modesto.

A local protest event is due to begin at 3 p.m. Sunday at the corner of Monte Vista Avenue and Countryside Drive in Turlock.

According to a press release issued by the organizers of the event, the “peaceful rally” is organized to “protest against the Islamic Republic of Iran which has started a massacre throughout the country against the massive Iranian youth uprisings demanding the fundamental rights of women and human rights”.

A major anti-government protest erupted in Iran on Friday at the funeral of a child killed in a shooting that his mother blamed on security forces. It is the latest in a wave of protests that have erupted across the country over the past two months.

Videos circulating on social media showed hundreds of protesters at the funeral of 9-year-old Kian Pirfalak in the southwestern city of Izeh. Protests also erupted in the eastern city of Zahedan, which saw deadliest violence since the nationwide protests began.

The protests first erupted after the September 16 death of a 22-year-old woman in the custody of the country’s vice squad. They quickly turned into calls for the overthrow of Iran’s ruling clerics and an end to the theocracy established after the 1979 Islamic revolution.

Authorities have severely restricted media access and periodically shut down the internet as they struggle to contain the biggest challenge to their leadership in more than a decade, making it difficult to confirm details of the unrest in different parts of the country. country.

Iranian state media reported that seven people were killed and several injured, including members of the security forces, in a shooting in Izeh on Wednesday. Authorities blamed the attack on “terrorists” without providing further details.

Among the victims was Pirfalak. Her mother, Zeinab Molaei, said security forces stopped the family in their car and told them to leave for their own safety due to a protest nearby. When they turned around, security forces opened fire on the vehicle, she said, according to the semi-official Fars news agency.

State media initially said a young girl had been killed, but later changed that information. Fars said 11 people were arrested in connection with the shooting in Izeh, which Iranian officials say is under investigation.

Dozens of demonstrators had gathered in different parts of Izeh at the time of the attack, chanting anti-government slogans and throwing stones at police, who fired tear gas to disperse them, state media reported. ‘era. Protesters also set fire to a Shia religious seminary in Izeh.

Violence erupted around some of the protests as security forces cracked down on dissent. Iran has also been the scene of a number of recent attacks blamed on separatists and religious extremists, including a shooting at an important Shia shrine last month that killed more than a dozen people and was claimed by the Islamic State group.

An Iranian Revolutionary Guard intelligence officer was killed during a violent protest in Sahneh, a Kurdish area in western Iran, on Friday, the semi-official Tasnim news agency reported. He identified the deceased as Colonel Nader Beirami and said the attackers had been arrested.

Iranian officials have sought to link the attacks to the protests and blame all unrest on hostile foreign actors, without providing evidence. Protesters say they are fed up after decades of repression by a clergy they see as corrupt and dictatorial.

At least 388 people have been killed and more than 16,000 arrested, according to Human Rights Activists in Iran, a group monitoring the unrest. It indicates that at least 53 members of the security forces were killed.

Rights groups accuse security forces of firing live ammunition and birds at protesters, and beating them with batons, violence captured in numerous videos circulating online.

— The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Sand in an hourglass: Childhood pals rekindle friendship after 43 years – Salisbury Post https://odessasem.com/sand-in-an-hourglass-childhood-pals-rekindle-friendship-after-43-years-salisbury-post/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 05:11:51 +0000 https://odessasem.com/sand-in-an-hourglass-childhood-pals-rekindle-friendship-after-43-years-salisbury-post/ Sand in an hourglass: childhood friends rekindle friendship after 43 years Posted at 12:10 a.m. on Tuesday, November 15, 2022 1 of 2 Tim Bost, left to right, Rick Tucker and Phil Collins catch up on the good old days at the Smoke Pit in Salisbury on Thursday. The trio had not seen each other […]]]>

Sand in an hourglass: childhood friends rekindle friendship after 43 years

Posted at 12:10 a.m. on Tuesday, November 15, 2022

Each day seems to go faster than the last, and if a person is not careful, a few years can turn into decades.

For three childhood friends from Kannapolis, a reunion in Salisbury last week was the first time since 1979 that they had all been together. They are determined not to waste any more time.

Tim Bost, Rick Tucker and Phil Collins grew up together in Kannapolis. They attended North Kannapolis Baptist Church and forged a close friendship in a traveling choir.

“We’ve been everywhere from Canada to Florida to the Midwest,” Tucker said.

The last time the three were together was for Collins’ wedding in November 1979. On Thursday, they joined the Smoke Pit for a long-awaited feast, where they reminisced about those trips across the country , from flat tires to short lived novels.

“The three of us were very close, but we all got married and went our own way,” Bost said. “I ended up working on a few associate degrees, then a bachelor’s degree at Pfieffer University before getting a master’s in public administration at UNC-Greensboro. I finished that course, got married, had two kids, then went to work for the Salisbury Police Department and the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office.

Bost was the only one left in Rowan County, the other two having gone to different areas.

Tucker dated Gardner-Webb, where he was Collins’ roommate for a few years. He eventually went to seminary and was an associate minister for years.

After earning a Bachelor of Commerce, he worked for CitiBank for a while and as a project manager for AETNA Insurance. In recent years, health complications made work impossible for him, and he quit completely in 2017.

Collins worked in advertising for several years, but earned a master’s degree in secondary education and began teaching in 1994. He was absent from work when his wife fell ill.

While the time apart has been filled with full-time jobs, family affairs, and personal triumphs, a shift in mindset has come with age.

“As you get older, you become more sentimental,” Bost said. “It’s just natural. I had actually released a few photo albums, and I have a ton of photo albums, but I hadn’t come across this one in maybe 10 years. I saw these guys in there and I thought, “I’d do anything to see them, but I don’t even know where they are.”

Although he hadn’t seen Collins in years, Bost still knew how to get in touch with him.

“For years after we last saw each other, Phil and I were sending a Christmas card back and forth,” Bost said. “We had a thing where we would include a silver dollar in the card and send it with the card, so we traded that coin every year. For some reason we have stopped sending the cards. When I contacted Phil he said he had found the piece so I am expecting it in my Christmas card this year.

Tucker laments how they broke up and what it cost them personally.

“We really missed our friendship,” Tucker said. “We were good friends and we shared a lot of experiences together. Sure, we were young, but as we lived our lives, I missed that friendship.

Collins said reconnecting with old friends was special, even if it took longer than expected.

“It took us too long to reconnect, but I’m glad we did,” Collins said. He added that he intended not to let another 43 years pass without seeing his old friends again.

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COUNTY BRIEFING | News, Sports, Jobs https://odessasem.com/county-briefing-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 05:47:28 +0000 https://odessasem.com/county-briefing-news-sports-jobs/ Wooddale Cemetery All summer and fall decorations must be removed from Woodsdale Cemetery by November 17 or they will be discarded. CCRT meeting The Columbiana County Retired Teachers Association will meet Thursday noon at the First United Methodist Church in Lisbon. Lunch will feature Janet Creighton and her program “Dinner with the President.” […]]]>

Wooddale Cemetery

All summer and fall decorations must be removed from Woodsdale Cemetery by November 17 or they will be discarded.

CCRT meeting

The Columbiana County Retired Teachers Association will meet Thursday noon at the First United Methodist Church in Lisbon. Lunch will feature Janet Creighton and her program “Dinner with the President.” Call 330-385-5560 for more information.

Salem Trees and Trains

The Burchfield Homestead Trees and Trains event in Salem will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. on November 19 and 20. At Burchfield Homestead, 867 E. 4th St., each of the 17 decorated trees was inspired by a Burchfield painting. Attorney Fred Naragon’s office, 248 E. State St., is the headquarters for the train layout; use the back entrance on Sugar Tree Alley. A $3 donation covers both sites. Children under 10 are free. For more information, call 330-717-0092.

Kloset Kingdom Holiday Hours

East Palestine Way Station/Kingdom Kloset will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday of Thanksgiving week. It will be closed for Thanksgiving and Friday.

Rescue Mission Thanksgiving

A full Thanksgiving meal will be served on Thanksgiving Day from 1 to 5 p.m. and from 6 to 7 p.m. for the public. The prepared feast will be served free of charge in the dining room of the Rescue Mission building located at 1300 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Youngstown. Meal donations are now accepted at the Mission. Most needed items include canned green beans, stovetop stuffing, canned sweet potatoes, and butter. Monetary donations are also needed. Only $2.47 provides a full meal at the Mission. Gifts can be mailed to PO Box 298 Youngstown, OH 44501 or given online at www.RescueMissionMV.org/give. Staff, cooks, donors and volunteers will prepare turkey, mash and sweet potatoes, stuffing, green beans, cranberry sauce and desserts. No reservations are required and all are welcome. Questions regarding Thanksgiving meals should be directed to Mike Byers, Kitchen Manager, at 330-744-5485 Ext. 510.

Northside Church Clock

Northside Church in East Liverpool will host guest speaker Dr Bill Ury at revival services on Sunday at 10.30am and 6pm and Monday to Wednesday during evening services at 6.30pm. Ury grew up in Taiwan as a missionary child. He graduated from Asbury College and Asbury Seminary. He also studied in Israel and completed his doctorate at Drew. He taught systematic and historical theology at Wesley Biblical Seminary for 23 years. He is married to Diane, and they have three daughters and a son. The Urys served as the principal pastors of the Evangelical Methodist Church in Elizabeth City, North Carolina from 2012 to 2017. Ury currently serves as a National Holiness Ambassador for The Salvation Army. Special music and babysitting will be available at all departments. The congregation invites the community to attend. The church is located at the corner of St. Clair Avenue and Orchard Grove.




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Hawaiian seminarians make great strides on the path to the priesthood https://odessasem.com/hawaiian-seminarians-make-great-strides-on-the-path-to-the-priesthood/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 11:10:20 +0000 https://odessasem.com/hawaiian-seminarians-make-great-strides-on-the-path-to-the-priesthood/ Seminarians in Hawaii gather for a group photo in the chapel of St. Patrick’s Seminary Oct. 24 following the installation of one in the ministry of lector and another in the ministry of acolyte. Left to right, Deacon Arrion Rosales (fourth-year theology), Taylor Mitchell (second-year theology), Kurt Meyer (third-year theology), Anthony “AJ” Poore (first-year theology), […]]]>

Seminarians in Hawaii gather for a group photo in the chapel of St. Patrick’s Seminary Oct. 24 following the installation of one in the ministry of lector and another in the ministry of acolyte. Left to right, Deacon Arrion Rosales (fourth-year theology), Taylor Mitchell (second-year theology), Kurt Meyer (third-year theology), Anthony “AJ” Poore (first-year theology), Anthony Tran (theology of third year), Preston Castro (third year of theology) and Francis Hai Pham (third year of theology). (Photo courtesy of Anthony Tran)

Two Hawaiian seminarians studying at St. Patrick’s Seminary and University in Menlo Park, Calif., achieved major milestones in their training Oct. 24. Anthony Poore received the Minor Order of Reader and Taylor Mitchell received the Minor Order of Acolyte.

Meanwhile, in Wisconsin, Honolulu seminarian John Akau received the ministry of acolyte Oct. 26 at Sacred Heart Seminary and School of Theology in Hales Corners. Akau was one of four seminarians installed in this ministry. The others come from the dioceses of Saginaw, Springfield-Cape Girardeau and Pensacola-Tallahassee. Below are Mitchell’s thoughts on this latest development in his training.

Whose turn is it to do the dishes?

By Taylor K. Mitchell
Special for the Herald

It’s funny how so many elements of our daily lives are reflected in our liturgy.

I remember we argued with my brother when we were growing up about whose job it was to set the table and do the dishes. Now my seminarian brothers and I have a schedule that tells us that, but otherwise nothing else has changed.

On October 24, as part of my continuing priesthood formation, I was installed as an acolyte by Archbishop Alexander Sample of Portland, Oregon. The installation took place here at St. Patrick’s Seminary Chapel in Menlo Park, California.

The duties of the acolyte include service at the altar, assisting the priest and deacon. An acolyte’s job is primarily to prepare the altar and sacred vessels, to act as a Eucharistic minister when necessary, and to help purify the sacred vessels after Communion.

When I explained to my mother that I was going to be a sidekick, I described it as becoming an official altar boy, and she asked me, “Haven’t you been doing this for years already?” And she’s right – I served at Mass for many years. Same with my setup as a reader last year – I had been reading for years already.

So what’s different about being ordained to these ministries, especially if we’ve been doing them forever?

I find that during my training journey, I come back again and again to things I already know, but with an invitation to know them again on a deeper level. So now I’ve started washing the dishes again after the meal – but it’s no longer a simple supper, but rather the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

My job at the celestial banquet is to do the dishes – and I couldn’t be more grateful for this honor.

Taylor Mitchell is a second-year theology student preparing for the priesthood for the Diocese of Honolulu at St. Patrick’s Seminary and University in Menlo Park, California.

Honolulu seminarian John Akau and three others were installed in acolyte ministry Oct. 26 at Sacred Heart Seminary and School of Theology in Hales Corners, Wisconsin. Pictured from left are Akau, Dan Christe (Diocese of Saginaw), Bishop Christophe Pierre, Apostolic Nuncio to the United States, and President, Father Raul Gomez-Ruiz, President-Rector of Sacred Heart Seminary, Daniel Dunn (Diocese of Springfield-Cape Girardeau) and Randy Recker (Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee). (Photo courtesy of Sacred Heart Seminary and School of Theology)

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The Hopeful Legacy of America’s First Black Priest https://odessasem.com/the-hopeful-legacy-of-americas-first-black-priest/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/the-hopeful-legacy-of-americas-first-black-priest/ “Father Augustus Tolton – ‘Gus’ as he was called in his youth – he grew up in Missouri and he was a slave,” O’Neill explained. “But his mother, Martha Jane, took him and his two siblings and she crossed the Mississippi River amidst fire from Confederate soldiers… [Arriving] on the other side, they landed in […]]]>

“Father Augustus Tolton – ‘Gus’ as he was called in his youth – he grew up in Missouri and he was a slave,” O’Neill explained. “But his mother, Martha Jane, took him and his two siblings and she crossed the Mississippi River amidst fire from Confederate soldiers… [Arriving] on the other side, they landed in Quincy, Illinois, and that’s where he grew up.

O’Neill explained how, while in Illinois, Tolton attended a Catholic school, where he may have begun to take great interest in the idea of ​​becoming a priest, eventually coming under the tutelage of two German priests from the region.

However, his path to the priesthood would not be easy, as he was not considered a candidate for seminaries in the United States due to his race.

“[The priests] tried to get him into every seminary in the United States and he was rejected at every level,” O’Neill described. “No one in America was ready for the first African-American priest… [Eventually]they sent him to the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith in Rome… where he studied and was a very popular seminarian… [going on to] be ordained in 1886.

After being ordained and graduating from seminary, Tolton was more than ready to take on the missionary work that was to be given to him – preparing to go to Africa studying languages ​​and cultures. However, a last minute “bait-and-switch” – as O’Neill described it – led Tolton to perhaps one of the toughest assignments he could have faced.

“He ended up being sent back to Quincy, Illinois, where he had… grown up, where he had been bullied, where he hadn’t been accepted… So he was brought back to the parish maybe the most difficult of all, the territory of the mission. here in the United States.

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St. Joe’s Tomm and Buffalo Seminary’s Murphy win All-Catholic Cross Country titles https://odessasem.com/st-joes-tomm-and-buffalo-seminarys-murphy-win-all-catholic-cross-country-titles/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 23:32:00 +0000 https://odessasem.com/st-joes-tomm-and-buffalo-seminarys-murphy-win-all-catholic-cross-country-titles/ Press Staff Reports St. Joe Jr. Sam Tomm and Buffalo Seminary Jr. Fiona Murphy won the individual championships at the Monsignor Martin All-Catholic Cross Country Meet Thursday at Como Park. Tomm completed the 3.1-mile course in 17:05.65 to beat Casey Black of St. Mary’s, who finished in 17:26.81, and Ryan Janese of Nichols, who finished […]]]>

Press Staff Reports

St. Joe Jr. Sam Tomm and Buffalo Seminary Jr. Fiona Murphy won the individual championships at the Monsignor Martin All-Catholic Cross Country Meet Thursday at Como Park.

Tomm completed the 3.1-mile course in 17:05.65 to beat Casey Black of St. Mary’s, who finished in 17:26.81, and Ryan Janese of Nichols, who finished in 17:49.91 .






Buffalo Seminary’s junior Fiona Murphy wins the Women’s All-Catholic Cross Country Championships at Como Park in Lancaster on November 3, 2022.


Joseph Cook



Murphy’s winning time was 20:32.72. Julia Weyer of Nardin was second (21:32.01) and Claire Daniels of Sacred Heart was third (21:36.18).

On the boys’ side, St. Francis won the team title with 56 points, with runners in fifth, sixth, eighth, 12th and 15th places. Canisius was second (62), followed by Nichols (69), St. Joe’s (71), St. Mary’s (155), Bishop Timon (166) and Gow (190).

On the girls’ side, Sacred Heart won the team title with four top-10 finishes and a total of 32 points. St. Mary’s was second (58), followed by Nardin (69), Buffalo Seminary (93), Nichols (111), and Mt. Mercy (167).

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The top seven runners from the winning team and the top three not from the winning team in boys and girls travel to the State Federation meet Nov. 20 in Wappingers Falls.

The meet also determined first- and second-team All-Catholic runners, based on their outcome. The top seven were named to the first team; the next seven were the second team.

The first all-Catholic men’s team: Tomm, Black, Janese, Eli Noecker (Canisius), Michael Stadler (St. Francis), Eric Lanning (St. Francis) and Lucas Gawron (St. Joe’s). The boys’ second team, starting with eighth place overall: Ryan Borello (St. Francis), Ethan Johnson (Canisius), Landon Schoenberger (Canisius), Eli Kiddy (Nichols), Adam Cline (St. Francis), Ryan Koeppen (Nichols), Owen Block (Nichols).

The first all-Catholic women’s team: Murphy, Weyer, Daniels, Grace Caterina (Sacred Heart), Mya Nazzarett (St. Mary’s), Barbara Kunz (Sacred Heart) and Victoria Mineo (St. Mary’s). The second female team, starting with eighth place: Shelby Paner (Sacred Heart), Isabella Prospero (St. Mary’s), Maeve Weimer (Nardin), Annie McClure (Sacred Heart), Emimly Huckell (Nichols), Catherine Pivarunas (Sacred -Heart) and Jocelyn Rath (Buffalo Seminary).

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Pastor Chuck Naylor Joins Herrington Bethel Church in Augusta https://odessasem.com/pastor-chuck-naylor-joins-herrington-bethel-church-in-augusta/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 13:32:50 +0000 https://odessasem.com/pastor-chuck-naylor-joins-herrington-bethel-church-in-augusta/ Pastor Chuck Naylor of Carrollton has been chosen to lead Herrington Bethel Church (HBC), located south of Augusta on Arbor Rd.Naylor comes to HBC with 35 years of ministry experience and an enthusiasm to serve the congregation and community.Pastor Chuck has ministered in several churches during his career, including Carrollton First UMC from 2001 to […]]]>

Pastor Chuck Naylor of Carrollton has been chosen to lead Herrington Bethel Church (HBC), located south of Augusta on Arbor Rd.
Naylor comes to HBC with 35 years of ministry experience and an enthusiasm to serve the congregation and community.
Pastor Chuck has ministered in several churches during his career, including Carrollton First UMC from 2001 to 2008. He is a graduate of Asbury College and Seminary and Ashland Seminary.
He and his 38-year-old wife, Mickey, are from Cardington. They have three children: Jonathan, youth pastor at Mt. Pleasant UMC, Carrollton; Ethan, of Fairfax, Virginia; and Abbey, who is currently attending Le Moyne University.
Pastor Chuck has coached cross country at the high school and college level. He enjoys fishing, archery, camping, hiking, hunting, biking and running. He has been breeding and training German Shepherds for over 20 years.
Herrington Bethel Church was founded in 1825 by John Herrington, a Revolutionary War hero and devout Christian who moved to Carroll County in 1817. In 1843, the historic sandstone church was built in high on a hill in the woods, on land donated by Herrington. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Herrington Bethel Church is open for worship each Sunday at 10 a.m. Sunday classes for children and adults start at 9 a.m. Visit online:
HerringtonBethel.com or follow on Facebook. To contact the church, email info@herringtonbethel.com or 330-627-5291.

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Turkish AIDF builds religious seminaries in Afghanistan https://odessasem.com/turkish-aidf-builds-religious-seminaries-in-afghanistan/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 12:47:37 +0000 https://odessasem.com/turkish-aidf-builds-religious-seminaries-in-afghanistan/ The Taliban Education Ministry said on Saturday that a Turkish humanitarian institution has pledged to establish five religious seminaries in different provinces of Afghanistan. Habibullah Agha, the Taliban’s education minister, and Sheikh Mohammad Toran, the organization’s head, signed a memorandum of understanding in the Afghan capital Kabul, the statement said. The Minister hailed the initiative […]]]>

The Taliban Education Ministry said on Saturday that a Turkish humanitarian institution has pledged to establish five religious seminaries in different provinces of Afghanistan.

Habibullah Agha, the Taliban’s education minister, and Sheikh Mohammad Toran, the organization’s head, signed a memorandum of understanding in the Afghan capital Kabul, the statement said.

The Minister hailed the initiative of the Aid & International Development Forum (AIDF) as a “major step” and said the ministry will provide all available facilities necessary for the implementation of the project.

Each of these four-class religious seminaries will be established at a cost of $25,000 in five provinces, according to the ministry statement.

The organization would build five religious schools in five different provinces of the country as per the memorandum of understanding. Each school will include four classrooms, a boundary wall, a mosque, a drinking water supply system and other necessary equipment, the ministry said in a statement.

It should be noted that after the Taliban came to power, the number of religious schools built increased in many parts of Afghanistan, with particular emphasis on the construction and renovation of religious institutions.

Meanwhile, about half of Afghan schools have been closed and girls in grades up to sixth grade have been barred from attending since the group took control.

It comes as a number of women have again rallied in Kabul to renew the call for girls’ schools to reopen, as the Taliban deprived them of an education for more than 400 days.

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Christian Ethicist Urges Vote ‘No’ on Legalizing Recreational Marijuana in Missouri https://odessasem.com/christian-ethicist-urges-vote-no-on-legalizing-recreational-marijuana-in-missouri/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 13:42:19 +0000 https://odessasem.com/christian-ethicist-urges-vote-no-on-legalizing-recreational-marijuana-in-missouri/ EDITOR’S NOTE: J. Alan Branch serves as professor of Christian ethics at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo. At their annual meeting in St. Charles, Oct. 24-25, Missouri Baptist Messengers approved a resolution opposing the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes. “… [W]The desire to protect the people of Missouri from the dangers […]]]>

EDITOR’S NOTE: J. Alan Branch serves as professor of Christian ethics at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo. At their annual meeting in St. Charles, Oct. 24-25, Missouri Baptist Messengers approved a resolution opposing the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes. “… [W]The desire to protect the people of Missouri from the dangers of state-legal recreational marijuana by calling for a “no” vote on the measure titled Amendment 3 in the Nov. 8, 2022, Missouri ballot,” their resolution reads. In the following essay, Branch explains why legalizing marijuana would be a mistake for Missourians. The graphic below the essay was created by the Missouri Baptist Convention Christian Life Commission.

Legalizing recreational marijuana is bad public policy for Missouri. On Nov. 8, Missouri voters will be asked to amend the state’s constitution to remove bans on the sale, use and cultivation of marijuana. This would make Missouri the 20th state to legalize recreational cannabis, but Missourians should think carefully and reverse the national trend. The acrostic NAIVE can help us understand why legalizing recreational pot is a bad idea for the Show Me State.

NOTNegative effects on the brain. Marijuana has very harmful effects on the brains of young people and much of the damage is not reversible. A study in the American Medical Association Journal of Psychiatry of June 2021, concluded that “cannabis use during adolescence is associated with impaired neurodevelopment” in areas of the brain undergoing the greatest age-related changes in mid to late adolescence. Even though Missouri’s proposed amendment sets the legal age for cannabis use at 21, its statewide legalization ensures that more cannabis will end up in the hands of more teenagers and more young people brilliant minds will be damaged.

Aaddiction is possible. Although marijuana is not addictive in the same way as cocaine or heroin, that does not mean that there is no risk of marijuana addiction. According to the 2014 article in the New England Journal of Medicineabout 9% of those who experiment with marijuana will become addicted, but the risk of addiction is much higher for those who start using pot during adolescence, with 1 in 6 teens who use pot eventually becoming addicted.

IPoisoning is dangerous for Missouri. Legalizing marijuana will mean more Missourians driving while intoxicated, which means greater danger on our highways and work sites.

Vlatest increase in the potency of marijuana. Today’s marijuana contains four to five times more THC, the chemical that gets people high, than previous generations of pot. This means that the cannabis sold today is much stronger and more dangerous than what was grown 50 years ago. Higher levels of THC mean more negative consequences for Missourians.

Evile behavior. The myth that smoking pot makes people friendlier and sweeter should be exposed for the lie that it is. For example, marijuana use is correlated with an increased likelihood of domestic violence. In 2018, researchers from the University of Ohio and the University of Tennessee reported that 59.5% of men participating in court-ordered batterer intervention programs had used marijuana in the past. the previous year, an amplified danger when alcohol is also involved. It’s unclear how widespread use of high-potency cannabis will affect violent crime and sexual assault rates in Missouri, but use of any drug lowers inhibitions and creates more threatening circumstances for victims. families, women and children.

Legalizing recreational marijuana is a bad idea for Missourians, especially our children and teens. Once the smokescreen of arguments about increasing tax revenue and decreasing incarceration is swept away, the cold reality is that legalized pot means damage to the next generation and danger to the state. entire.

This graphic, courtesy of the Missouri Baptist Convention (MBC) Christian Life Commission, was released at the MBC’s annual meeting, October 24-25.

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