Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 04:11:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://odessasem.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T201706.303-150x150.png Seminary – Odessa Sem http://odessasem.com/ 32 32 Saginaw Valley State drops overtime thriller at Ferris State http://odessasem.com/saginaw-valley-state-drops-overtime-thriller-at-ferris-state/ http://odessasem.com/saginaw-valley-state-drops-overtime-thriller-at-ferris-state/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 03:57:31 +0000 http://odessasem.com/saginaw-valley-state-drops-overtime-thriller-at-ferris-state/ Saginaw Valley State University scored in almost every way they could, but the Cardinals couldn’t pull off a 2-point overtime conversion on the road on Saturday, losing to Ferris State, 47-45 . SVSU scored on an extra point return attempt blocked for a score from Michael Woolridge, three field goals from Conner Luksic, a 39-yard […]]]>

Saginaw Valley State University scored in almost every way they could, but the Cardinals couldn’t pull off a 2-point overtime conversion on the road on Saturday, losing to Ferris State, 47-45 .

SVSU scored on an extra point return attempt blocked for a score from Michael Woolridge, three field goals from Conner Luksic, a 39-yard interception return by Noah Suber, two runs from Tommy Scott and a touchdown pass with no time left from Matt Considine to Isaiah Johnson-Mack to send the game into overtime.

Ferris took the ball first in overtime and scored on a one-yard run from Marvin Campbell. The extra point failed, but SVSU was flagged for roughing up the kicker. Considering the second chance, Ferris opted for the 2-point conversion, scoring on a pass from Evan Cummins to Keidren Davis.

On SVSU’s possession, a pass interference penalty gave the ball to the Cardinals at the Ferris 2-yard line. One run scored a yard, with a second run losing five yards. Facing the third and goal of 5, Considine connected with Derrick Hinton Jr. on a completion that dropped five yards, establishing a fourth and a goal of 10.

But Considine found former Michigan star Lutheran Seminary Casey Williams for a 10-yard touchdown pass, keeping SVSU in the game. But the pass for the 2-point conversion fell incomplete, giving Ferris the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference victory.

Scott, a senior with Muskegon Catholic Central, finished with 110 rushing yards on 20 carries, Williams catching eight passes for 88 yards and a touchdown. Johnson-Mack caught four passes for 114 yards.

Woolridge and Victor Abraham made 11 tackles each for the SVSU defense, Woolridge adding 1.5 sacks and a fumble. Abraham also recovered from a fumble.

Cummins finished with 83 rushing yards and three touchdowns, completing 14 of 29 passes for 177 yards and three more touchdowns.

The Cardinals 1-2 will play their third straight road game at Wayne State, which kicks off at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 25.


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Deborah Gray White to give Gilder-Jordan Lecture on Southern Cultural History http://odessasem.com/deborah-gray-white-to-give-gilder-jordan-lecture-on-southern-cultural-history/ http://odessasem.com/deborah-gray-white-to-give-gilder-jordan-lecture-on-southern-cultural-history/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 12:55:00 +0000 http://odessasem.com/deborah-gray-white-to-give-gilder-jordan-lecture-on-southern-cultural-history/ By Rebecca Lauck Cleary University of Mississippi Communications Historian Deborah Gray White plans to explain the Scarlet and Black Project at Rutgers University and its implications for understanding history at the University of Mississippi for this year’s Gilder-Jordan Lecture on Cultural History from South. The talk will be given online at 5:30 p.m. on September […]]]>

By Rebecca Lauck Cleary

University of Mississippi Communications

Historian Deborah Gray White plans to explain the Scarlet and Black Project at Rutgers University and its implications for understanding history at the University of Mississippi for this year’s Gilder-Jordan Lecture on Cultural History from South. The talk will be given online at 5:30 p.m. on September 21. Submitted photo

Beginning in 2015, faculty, staff and students at Rutgers University gained a better understanding of the untold story of underprivileged populations in the history of the university through the Scarlet and Black Project, co-chaired by the historian Deborah Gray White.

In this year’s Gilder-Jordan lecture on Southern Cultural History at the University of Mississippi, “The Ticket Price: Paying for Diversity and Inclusion,” White will explain the Scarlet and Black Project itself – how African Americans and Native Americans influenced the Rutgers campus, and how this raised complex questions for the university to consider as it began to introspect and acknowledge the past.

She will deliver her free online talk at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday (September 21). Registration is available on bit.ly/3BRF98u.

“White’s reputation as a historian of African-American women is reason enough to invite her to give this prestigious lecture, but her work around the history of Rutgers University has been an additional layer of interest. for the selection committee, ”said Katie McKee, director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture.

“As the University of Mississippi continues its quest to directly confront a history deeply rooted in inequity, Rutgers provides a model for how higher education communities can collectively look to the past and imagine a future that emerges from the past. work we do in the present. “

The Scarlet and Black Project resulted in a three-volume ‘Scarlet and Black’, which traces the history of Rutgers’ beginnings from 1766 to the present day, finding out how he benefited from the slave economy and how the university became landlord. of the land it inhabits, as well as examining how concepts related to race and gender evolved over the 20th century. The books also focus on student activism and campus history of students of color from World War II to the present day.

“I was very happy that everyone with expertise agreed to help me,” White said. “We have a seminar on campus and the person researching the origins of the seminar had volunteered to help me, and the college archivist had researched the history of Rutgers, so he volunteered, and my colleagues and students all helped work on it.

“People have just come out of the woods, and we have an exceptional cadre of graduate students, some of whom are now assistant professors. We organized them and sent them to the archives and we paid them to do the research and the writing, and that’s how it went.

Undergraduates studied how Native Americans were driven from the land on which Rutgers was built in the first article of the first volume of the “Scarlet and Black” series.

“This kind of story pays dividends, but it costs,” White said. “There are a lot of people out there who won’t want this kind of story written, and I think we like to think of New Jersey as a northern state that didn’t have slaves, and in fact New Jersey. had more slaves than any other northern state in 1865, when the 13th Amendment was passed.

“I think finding out about the history of Mississippi is going to bring out a lot of things that a lot of people don’t want to hear and would rather forget. The price of the ticket is to understand that in order to really move forward we have to go through this and you have to understand that the price is emotional and financial. “

Prior to delivering the Gilder-Jordan lecture, White will meet online with graduate students from across the UM campus at 9 a.m. Tuesday to discuss his work with the Rutgers students who researched and wrote most of the essays published in the ” Scarlet and Black “. Her discussion will focus on the value of this type of research, including the benefits of research outside one’s area of ​​expertise, working collaboratively, entering the workforce with published material, and learning. the ins and outs of university publishing.

Interested students can register for the meeting at https://bit.ly/2XhYOPI.

“I love talking with graduate students and will use this time to talk about the profession and how to do it as a historian,” White said. “I want to tell them what are the best practices for graduate students, like how to choose a thesis topic as well as how to finish.”

White is Emeritus Professor of History on the Board of Governors at Rutgers and an expert on African American women’s history.

She is the author of “Am I not a woman?” Female slaves in the south of the plantation “ and “Too Heavy a Load: Black Women Defend Themselves, 1894-1994”. She is also editor of “Telling Histories: Black Women in the Ivory Tower”, a collection of personal accounts of African-American historians which chronicles the entry of black women into the profession of historian and the development of the field of black women’s history.

Organized by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the African American Studies Program, the Center for Civil War Research, and the Arch Dalrymple III Department of History, the Gilder-Jordan Lecture Series is made possible through generosity from the Gilder Foundation Inc. The series honors the late Richard Gilder of New York and his family, as well as alumni of Ole Miss Dan and Lou Jordan of Virginia.

Visit https://southernstudies.olemiss.edu/ or contact Afton Thomas at amthoma4@olemiss.edu for more details.



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Catholic Diocese to host a play about the first African-American priest in the United States | Characteristics http://odessasem.com/catholic-diocese-to-host-a-play-about-the-first-african-american-priest-in-the-united-states-characteristics/ http://odessasem.com/catholic-diocese-to-host-a-play-about-the-first-african-american-priest-in-the-united-states-characteristics/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 23:15:00 +0000 http://odessasem.com/catholic-diocese-to-host-a-play-about-the-first-african-american-priest-in-the-united-states-characteristics/ God called Augustus Tolton, who was born a slave in 1854 on a Missouri farm, and Tolton answered the call. Despite many obstacles, Tolton, with the support of his mother and a gracious priest, persevered in pursuing a life of faithful service, although no seminary in America would accept him because of his race. Eventually, […]]]>

God called Augustus Tolton, who was born a slave in 1854 on a Missouri farm, and Tolton answered the call.

Despite many obstacles, Tolton, with the support of his mother and a gracious priest, persevered in pursuing a life of faithful service, although no seminary in America would accept him because of his race. Eventually, after six years of studying in Rome, he became Reverend Augustus Tolton, the first African-American priest in the United States.

The Catholic Diocese of Victoria will bring the inspiring story “Tolton: From Slave to Priest” to life at a Crossroads. Three individual theatrical performances produced by Saint Luke Productions, a Washington-based company, will be provided to the public free of charge, although free will offers will be accepted. The first performance will take place on September 25 at the Notre-Dame-de-la-Victoire Cathedral Center in Victoria; the second on September 26 at the gymnasium of Our Lady of the Gulf Catholic School in Port Lavaca; and the third on September 27 at the Leo J. Welder Center for the Performing Arts in Victoria. All shows, which are recommended for ages 10 and up, will start at 7 p.m.

Tolton’s father escaped slavery and died fighting for the Union Army in the Civil War. In 1862, his mother fled the Missouri farm with her three children to find freedom in Illinois. She researched the Catholic Church as a spiritual foundation, and Reverend Peter McGirr, an Irish Catholic priest, noticed special qualities in young Tolton, said Jim Coleman, the Florida actor who plays Tolton in the drama.

McGirr took Tolton under his wing and allowed him to attend an all-white school where he was an excellent student able to speak multiple languages, Coleman said. McGirr, realizing Tolton’s call and his need to be ordained, sent letters to seminaries across the country, but none accepted Tolton. Ultimately, McGirr sent a letter to Rome and collected the money to send Tolton there for proper training. In Rome, Tolton met students of all races from all parts of the world, and they were friends.

“His mother was such a strong influence in his life, and she pushed him to move on and not let his lot in life hold him back, not to allow his situation, the minefield of the racism or prejudice, holds it back, ”Coleman said. . “He was able to navigate it with the help of his mother and his priests. It helps us understand that we cannot do it alone. It takes all of us.

The performance portrays a picture of perseverance and advancement together, and certainly underscores the importance of pursuing one’s calling no matter what.

“It takes every race, all of us, all of us together to do great things,” said Coleman. “You must love your persecutors, love your enemies, and bless those who curse you. You have to do this to fulfill God’s call.

Coleman has been a full-time actor for 30 years. He played the role of Tolton for about two years in 28 states. He said supporting Saint Luke Productions, a four-decade-old business that survives on donations and prayers, was worth it because of the unique stories told through high-quality performances.

“God ordered Saint Luke to come out and tell stories, and they need our support,” Coleman said. “We need to keep telling the stories of the saints – we need to know their stories. “

Leonardo Defilippis, producer and director of the play that founded Saint Luke Productions, experienced a revival of his faith in the late 1970s. At the time, he was an actor participating in Shakespearean festivals across the country . He began to seek his vocation and his mentor, a monk in a Benedictine monastery, guided him. The monk asked Defilippis to put on a play on the Gospel of Luke for a large family conference.

As he traveled, he began to correspond with Mother Teresa of Calcutta, now Saint Teresa of Calcutta, who encouraged him. From Saint Francis of Assisi and Saint John of the Cross to Saint Augustine and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, he began producing all kinds of shows that touched both the poor and the rich in places ranging from hospitals to prisons.

“It’s not a normal thing in our time, and it’s fascinating and artistically difficult,” Defilippis said. “These stories are incredibly powerful. These people were amazing in terms of humanity and transcendent nature, of what they communicated.

Defilippis chose to produce a play about Tolton after reading a book about him that piqued his interest. He befriended Bishop Joseph Perry, the postulator presenting Tolton’s canonization case, who provided him with historical documents that helped him write the show.

Tolton molded Christ with his compassion, love and resilience under persecution, Defilippis said. While most people try to change the world through hatred, anger, and division, Tolton led the way with love, compassion, and mercy.

Defilippis was impressed with Texas’ reaction to his Tolton game, which he hopes will serve as a lightning rod to stand up and live the truth.

“Some have been lukewarm, but I didn’t find that in Texas,” he said. “I think the story will resonate there.”

Janet Jones, director of communications for the Catholic Diocese of Victoria, said Reverend Brendan Cahill, bishop of the diocese, wanted to bring the coin to the area for his message of overcoming obstacles and persevering in the faith. In addition, attending the show is an activity that families can enjoy together.

“It’s about enlightening and uplifting, to show what great things he (Tolton) has been able to accomplish,” Jones said. “Some in the church opened their arms to him and took his education seriously. It is about the dignity and worth of every human being.

Elena Anita Watts is the feature editor for the Victoria Advocate. She covers faith, arts, culture and entertainment, and she can be reached at 361-580-6585 or ewatts@vicad.com.


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Where to party in Rockford http://odessasem.com/where-to-party-in-rockford/ http://odessasem.com/where-to-party-in-rockford/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 09:25:15 +0000 http://odessasem.com/where-to-party-in-rockford/ ROCKFORD – America’s favorite sandwich gets a special nod on Saturday. September 18 is National Cheeseburger Day. Here are a few places in Rockford to celebrate with a delicious burger on Saturday or any other day of the week. A classic cheeseburger is a burger topped with American cheese and other traditional ingredients like lettuce, […]]]>


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VUU to play VUL on September 18 at the Willard Bailey Classic | Richmond Free Press http://odessasem.com/vuu-to-play-vul-on-september-18-at-the-willard-bailey-classic-richmond-free-press/ http://odessasem.com/vuu-to-play-vul-on-september-18-at-the-willard-bailey-classic-richmond-free-press/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:58:17 +0000 http://odessasem.com/vuu-to-play-vul-on-september-18-at-the-willard-bailey-classic-richmond-free-press/ Virginia Union University’s long-awaited debut football game on its beautifully renovated grounds left a lot to be desired. The game this Saturday, September 18 against besieged personalities of the University of Virginia in Lynchburg to produce much happier results. Kick-off at Willie Lanier Field at Hovey Stadium is scheduled for 5 p.m. The match will […]]]>

Virginia Union University’s long-awaited debut football game on its beautifully renovated grounds left a lot to be desired.

The game this Saturday, September 18 against besieged personalities of the University of Virginia in Lynchburg to produce much happier results.

Kick-off at Willie Lanier Field at Hovey Stadium is scheduled for 5 p.m. The match will serve as Willard Bailey Classic.

Pickup is required on Lombardy Street.

Coach Alvin Parker’s Panthers fell to 0-2 with a 51-7 loss last Saturday to NCAA Division II juggernaut Valdosta State University of Georgia in front of a crowd of 5,019.

It was the inaugural game on Lanier Field, named after NFL Hall of Fame Willie Lanier, following the cancellation of the 2020 season.

VUU’s defense took a hit. The Panthers allowed 611 yards in their first 42-28 loss to Hampton University on September 4 and gave up 569 more yards against Valdosta State.

VUU trailed 27-0 at halftime and was down 37-0 after three quarters against the Blazers.

Jada Byers, a true 5-foot-7, 171-pound freshman from Hammonton, NJ, provided the offensive spark with 107 rushing yards and 118 extra yards on four kickoffs.

Byers produced the only touchdown on a 4-yard rush in the fourth quarter.

On the downside, star Charles Hall, who had six catches for 183 yards against Hampton, was held to no reception against the Georgians.

Preseason All-America kicker Jefferson Souza missed a 27-yard field goal that would have given the Panthers an early lead.

Quarterback Khalid Morris had 10 of 24 passes for 97 yards, with one interception. He has been sacked twice.

Jaiden Reavis of Highland Springs High School had three caches for 69 yards, including one for 46 yards.

In defense, Bryan Epps, also of Highland Springs High, was pulled over.

The Virginia Dragons at Lynchburg University are believed to serve as a “healing” remedy for VUU.

VUL lost its first game 54-0 at the University of Virginia-Wise and fell to 0-2 last week with a 50-14 loss to Mars Hill University in North Carolina.

Founded in 1886, VUL was previously known as Virginia Seminary and is a member of the National Christian College Athletic Association. The privately funded HBCU was a member of the CIAA from 1921 to 1954.

It is by pure coincidence that the Willard Bailey Classic will pit VUU against VUL.

The VUL football program was revived in 2011 by the same Willard Bailey who recorded a record 8-19 Dragons in three seasons.

A member of the Black College Football Hall of Fame, Coach Bailey coached at Virginia Union from 1971 to 1983 and then from 1995 to 2003. His two-stint VUU record was 157-73-6, with five consecutive playoffs in the league. NCAA Division II. berths from 1979 to 1983.

Don’t be surprised if the Willard Bailey Classic sets off a VUU winning streak. The Panthers’ upcoming games against VUL and Johnson C. Smith, Shaw, Lincoln and Chowan universities are much more winnable than the first two.

The Panthers’ CIAA Championship and NCAA submission odds will likely be determined by two home games, October 23 against Bowie State University and November 6 against Virginia State University.


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Cuban exiles remain hopeful of a free Cuba 2 months after historic protest on the island http://odessasem.com/cuban-exiles-remain-hopeful-of-a-free-cuba-2-months-after-historic-protest-on-the-island/ http://odessasem.com/cuban-exiles-remain-hopeful-of-a-free-cuba-2-months-after-historic-protest-on-the-island/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 22:15:54 +0000 http://odessasem.com/cuban-exiles-remain-hopeful-of-a-free-cuba-2-months-after-historic-protest-on-the-island/ ORLANDO, Florida – It has now been two months since the uprising in Cuba where thousands of people across the island flooded the streets to protest the government’s response to the pandemic and crackdown. But those in exile have not lost hope, like Annia Torres and her father, Leonel A. Pérez, who left Cuba after […]]]>

ORLANDO, Florida – It has now been two months since the uprising in Cuba where thousands of people across the island flooded the streets to protest the government’s response to the pandemic and crackdown. But those in exile have not lost hope, like Annia Torres and her father, Leonel A. Pérez, who left Cuba after religious persecution.

“At school, every year they would go out to really bully us and ask who belonged to a church here,” Torres recalls. “I’ve always been very attached to the faith, so I wasn’t ashamed of it, and I always raised my hand.”

Torres and his parents were targeted in Cuba in the 1970s because his parents were evangelical pastors in his hometown of San José de las Lajas, a town south of Havana. After communism took control of the island, all religion was banned.

“Yo varias ocasiones tuve, ejemplo: en un servicio religioso cantando corito y de buenas a primeras una pistola aquí en la espalda y así preso y cuántas cosas”, declared Pérez in his mother tongue that on several occasions he spoke. has a firearm surrendered. back on duty – detained and imprisoned once for several days. He was a pastor in Cuba for 17 years.

A d

“En los primeros años de la revolución se crearon campos de concentración en el año ’65; pastores desaparecidos, Seminarios clausurados ”, he declared during the first years of communism, the Cuban revolution created concentration camps in 1965; the pastors have disappeared and the seminaries have been closed.

In 1981, the father-of-two said that after an agreement between the Cuban government and Cuban leaders in South Florida authorized the departure of pastors, their wives and children, he took a flight with his family for the United States.

“Cuando llegué aquí, con una pluma en el bolsillo, el pasaporte en la mano y con el corazón lleno de esperanza,” Pérez said when he arrived in the United States, he had a pen in his pocket, his passport in hand and heart full of hope. That same hope he felt on July 11 when he saw his people on his beloved island rise up and protest against the regime.

When asked if he still feels that hope two months after the protest, he said, in Spanish, that everything has its timing and that it will be at the moment of God when he decides when the time of his people will come like it happened with the fall of the Soviet. Union without a shot.

A d

“I believe}. I do, and even though you don’t see a lot of people on the streets now because of course we have to get back to work, and you know, but we’re still here, and some communities keep going out. and protest, ”her daughter, Annia said.

Annia, who has spent most of her life in the real estate business, said one of those protests was recently held in New York on Tuesday outside the United Nations, where, according to Annia, the discussion did not include the situation in Cuba. .

“They didn’t mention Cuba and I say to myself: what are they thinking? We have a lot of human rights issues in Cuba, and the United Nations didn’t mention Cuba, so yes, we don’t, ”she said, adding that she joined them all. the possible opportunities to defend his people.

“If you’re part of the Cuban community, we’re all active, you know,” she said. came out and they are no longer afraid.

Copyright 2021 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.


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Brewington Oaks neighbors happy to see him go http://odessasem.com/brewington-oaks-neighbors-happy-to-see-him-go/ http://odessasem.com/brewington-oaks-neighbors-happy-to-see-him-go/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 23:23:00 +0000 http://odessasem.com/brewington-oaks-neighbors-happy-to-see-him-go/ ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) – The Brewington Oaks buildings on Seminary Street in Rockford Fall, room by room. Something many neighbors have said they are happy to see. “The buildings have been there for a long time. We’ve lived here for 12 to 13 years, ”said Stephen Sockwell, who lives down the street. “It’s going to […]]]>

ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) – The Brewington Oaks buildings on Seminary Street in Rockford Fall, room by room. Something many neighbors have said they are happy to see.

“The buildings have been there for a long time. We’ve lived here for 12 to 13 years, ”said Stephen Sockwell, who lives down the street. “It’s going to be different to see a great view this way.”

The buildings are known to be a hotspot for crime. Sockwell said it caused noise and commotion.

“We’ve been living like this for so long, you know, and now it would be nice to have some comfort and peace in the area,” he said.

He and several other neighbors hope the space will remain open, possibly with a park. Curtis Steulpnagl lives behind buildings and often spends time on his porch.

“We would love to enjoy the view, even if it’s just clouds and sky,” Stelpnagl said. “It would be nicer than staring at these 13-story buildings all day.”

Paul Logli is part of a redevelopment group seeking to revitalize the neighborhood. He said the buildings were wasting space with great potential.

“It’s just a great location. It is naturally a beautiful place overlooking the river, ”said Logli. “I think the development that could take place there would be really exciting, and it will be an anchor for development in the south end of Rockford.”

There is no definite plan for the redevelopment yet. The Rockford Housing Authority is expected to discuss it at its meeting on Thursday.

Copyright 2021 WIFR. All rights reserved.


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Martha Haigler obituary (1935 – 2021) – White Rock, South Carolina http://odessasem.com/martha-haigler-obituary-1935-2021-white-rock-south-carolina/ http://odessasem.com/martha-haigler-obituary-1935-2021-white-rock-south-carolina/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 17:11:48 +0000 http://odessasem.com/martha-haigler-obituary-1935-2021-white-rock-south-carolina/ Martha frick haigler May 4, 1935 – September 9, 2021 White Rock, South Carolina – Beloved and devoted mother and grandmother Martha Frick Haigler entered fame peacefully on September 9, 2021. She was born in Greenville, SC on May 4, 1935, Jacob’s eldest daughter Harvey and Catherine Hackney Frick. Martha has always had a love […]]]>
Martha frick haigler
May 4, 1935 – September 9, 2021
White Rock, South Carolina – Beloved and devoted mother and grandmother Martha Frick Haigler entered fame peacefully on September 9, 2021. She was born in Greenville, SC on May 4, 1935, Jacob’s eldest daughter Harvey and Catherine Hackney Frick.
Martha has always had a love for the Lutheran Church and its musical tradition. She attended Newberry College and graduated with Distinction in 1956. While at Newberry, she was active with the Newberry College Singers, was on the staff of Newberrian, was listed in Who’s Who, and has received the Cromer Citizenship Medal. She maintained a close bond with her alma mater throughout her life, even as a member of the board of directors of the college’s Alumni Association.
Martha was a member of the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church for 51 years and sang in the church choir for much of her time there. She served multiple terms as church treasurer and church board member throughout her long membership. She has also supported the church’s broader missions through her association with the women of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, serving as secretary and treasurer at various times during her work with them. She also served on the board of directors of Lutheridge in Arden, North Carolina.
Professionally, Martha was an accountant at Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary for 29 years, and she faithfully served the ELCA Region 9 Archives as a volunteer. For the latter service, she received the H. Walton Greever Award in 2017.
Martha traveled extensively after her retirement from seminary, touring Europe and indulging her love of sacred music by attending the Oberammergau Passion Piece twice in her life, once a decade. Her love of travel was surpassed by her love and pride in South Carolina, which she demonstrated through the many organizations she supported, including South Carolina ETV, Columbia’s Riverbanks Zoo, and the South Carolina State Museum. .
Martha is survived by her two daughters, Brigadier General (ret’d) Janice M. Haigler, Mrs. Rachel H. Cockrell (Philip), three grandsons, Samuel (Eva), Lee (Sarah) and Jacob Cockrell (fiancee Jessica Amick ), two sisters, Anna Catherine Snyder and Sara Russell, several nieces, a nephew and several cousins.
Martha Haigler’s funeral will be held at the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 3909 Forest Drive in Columbia, South Carolina on Monday, September 13, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. The family will receive visitors to the church prior to the service starting at noon. A private family burial will take place at a later date.
Memorials are suggested at: Good Shepherd Lutheran, 3909 Forest Dr, Columbia, SC 29201; Newberry College, Advancement Office, 2100 College Street, Newberry, SC 29108; Lutheridge, c / o Novus Way Ministries, PO Box 830, Arden, NC 28704 or www.novusway.org ; Martha F Haigler Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary Scholarship, 4201 N Main St, Columbia, SC 29203; or The Heritage at Lowman PO Box 444, White Rock, SC 29177
Memories and messages can be shared with family at www.whitakerfuneralhome.com.
Whitaker Funeral Home is honored to help the family.

Posted by The State on September 12, 2021.


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After major storm clean-up, NOBTS reopens campus http://odessasem.com/after-major-storm-clean-up-nobts-reopens-campus/ http://odessasem.com/after-major-storm-clean-up-nobts-reopens-campus/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 18:04:43 +0000 http://odessasem.com/after-major-storm-clean-up-nobts-reopens-campus/ By Gary D. Myers, NOBTS Communications NEW ORLEANS – The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and Leavell College President Jamie Dew announced the reopening of the school campus on September 7 following Hurricane Ida. The campus has been closed to residents since the August 29 storm cut power across the region. Power to the campus […]]]>

By Gary D. Myers, NOBTS Communications

NEW ORLEANS – The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and Leavell College President Jamie Dew announced the reopening of the school campus on September 7 following Hurricane Ida. The campus has been closed to residents since the August 29 storm cut power across the region.

Power to the campus was fully restored at the end of the day on September 6, and the seminar facilities teams checked every residence on campus to ensure there were no electrical problems at the school level. unity. After the facilities team assessed each unit, Dew invited residents to come back and reoccupy the campus accommodations.

Once power is restored and facilities have been verified, students can safely return to the NOBTS campus, according to President Jamie Dew.

“The campus is now open and we’re very excited about it,” Dew told the seminar family via a social media video. “I am delighted to see you back on campus to continue the work God has put us here to do.”

In a video directed to campus residents, Dew urged returning students, faculty and staff to shop for groceries and refuel before entering town. As many stores reopen and some supplies become available, there are long lines at grocery stores and gas stations. With power restored to more than 75% of New Orleans homes, Dew warned that basic services could be strained over the next few days as many people return.

Dew praised the hard work of the SEND Relief disaster relief volunteers and facilities team and local SBC churches such as Temple Baptist Church in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, in making the return possible.

“Our team has worked really hard to bring the campus back to a place where you can be safe here,” Dew said. “Much of the cleanup is already done, and I think you’ll enjoy being back on campus.”

Dew also announced that the Insurance and Buildings Assessment Team will conduct in-depth inspections of all housing and public buildings from September 8-10. While the school has escaped the catastrophic damage seen in places like LaPlace, Grand Isle and Lafitte, the roof and water damage on campus will add up. The in-depth piece-by-piece assessment will help provide a more definitive assessment of the losses.

Classes on the main campus were suspended during the first week following the storm to allow students time to establish longer-than-planned evacuation locations. On September 7, the seminar relaunched classes on the main campus in a virtual format and will continue virtually throughout the week of September 13. On September 20, NOBTS and Leavell College will relaunch in-person classes on the main campus. Campus offices began to reopen on September 8.

In the coming weeks, the seminar hopes to mobilize students, faculty and staff to help with monumental recovery efforts in the region’s hardest hit areas, Dew said.

Students can return to the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary campus after disaster relief teams quickly complete the clean-up and repairs.


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In memory of Dale Brown, professor emeritus at Bethany Seminary and great theologian of the Brethren Church – News http://odessasem.com/in-memory-of-dale-brown-professor-emeritus-at-bethany-seminary-and-great-theologian-of-the-brethren-church-news/ http://odessasem.com/in-memory-of-dale-brown-professor-emeritus-at-bethany-seminary-and-great-theologian-of-the-brethren-church-news/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 22:12:42 +0000 http://odessasem.com/in-memory-of-dale-brown-professor-emeritus-at-bethany-seminary-and-great-theologian-of-the-brethren-church-news/ Dale Weaver Brown, 95, professor emeritus at Bethany Theological Seminary and prominent Brethren Church theologian as well as former Brethren Church annual conference moderator, passed away peacefully on August 30, in the presence of his family . . Born January 12, 1926 to Harlow and Cora (Weaver) Brown in Wichita, Kan., He was the fourth […]]]>

Dale Weaver Brown, 95, professor emeritus at Bethany Theological Seminary and prominent Brethren Church theologian as well as former Brethren Church annual conference moderator, passed away peacefully on August 30, in the presence of his family . .

Born January 12, 1926 to Harlow and Cora (Weaver) Brown in Wichita, Kan., He was the fourth of five boys, all of whom preceded him in death. His parents and grandparents greatly influenced him in his life and his faith: his father was called a “progressive grocer” by the Wichita Post; his parents were known for their integrity, their generosity and the quality of their affairs and their lives; his grandfathers were both farmers and Dunker preachers, farming during the week and preaching on Sundays.

“From an early age, Dale was shaped by those who had the fortitude and character to stand against all forms of violence, to open their hearts and homes to those in need of love,” wrote his daughter, Deanna Brown. “He had stories of many mentors, from a Sunday school teacher to his childhood pastor, James Elrod, to the elder DG Wine who accompanied him on his first experience as a student pastor. …. Although he had not been able to speak or write in his later years, his compassion and joy was felt by the caretakers, strangers and family.

Brown was married to Lois Kauffman Brown in 1947 and celebrated 68 years of marriage before his death in 2015. In the summer of 1948, they participated in an international workcamp in Italy as part of a brothers’ service unit, a experience that propelled their convictions. and future work to reduce poverty and war.

Brown graduated from McPherson (Kan.) College in 1946, received a degree from Bethany Seminary in Chicago in 1949, and a doctorate from Northwestern University in 1962. His education included studies at Drake University and Garrett Theological Seminary. .

Dale Brown (right) in conversation with a young Republican during the Ollie North protests in Orlando, Florida at the 1989 annual conference. In his Messenger As an article on the event, he wrote that during the conference, “an outside intrusion was placed under our wipers, an invitation to have our photos taken with Oliver North for $ 150. He was showing up at a meeting of the Young Republicans at a hotel across the Boulevard du Palais des Congrès, at the same time Yvonne Dilling was scheduled to speak at the Friday night service. Yvonne had once led Witness for Peace, one of the most effective programs against so ardently supported northern activity. [the Contra War]. What could be the best answer? He and other brother leaders for peace held a vigil of prayers, songs and testimonies attended by about 150 brothers. They were greeted by “a group of northern supporters waving flags and zealous,” Brown wrote. “Kneeling in prayer took on a new meaning in this setting. »Photo by Paul Grout

He was ordained a priest in 1946. He was pastor of Stover Memorial of the Brethren Church in Des Moines, Iowa, from 1949 to 1956. From 1958 to 1962, he worked at McPherson College as director of life nun and assistant professor of philosophy and religion. His teaching at Bethany Seminary began in 1956-58, while pursuing a doctoral program at Northwestern. He returned to Bethany as a professor of history and theology for over 30 years, 1962-1994. He has taught courses on Brethren theology, Bonhoeffer, and peacemaking, among other subjects. He was president of the American Theological Society (Midwest Chapter) in 1985-1986. He was later a member of the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown (Pa.) College, where an annual award is named in his honor.

He is the author of several books and writes numerous articles for the Church of the Brothers Messenger magazine as well as The travelers, the Christian century, the other side, newspaper editorials, and more. His first book, Understanding pietism, was published from his doctoral thesis in 1978, and in 1996 was republished in an updated edition. More recently, his book Biblical pacifism has been republished in a second edition by Brethren Press. Another way to believe, also published by Brethren Press, is available in English and Spanish (go to www.brethrenpress.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=dale+brown).

He was the moderator of the annual conference in 1972. He served on the former general council of the denomination in 1960-62, chaired the board of directors of On Earth Peace 1997-2000, was twice a member of the standing committee of the annual conference, served on the Denomination’s Interchurch Relations Committee, and early in his career was moderator of the former District of Middle Iowa. In a few examples of his various ecclesiastical interests, he also helped to frame the first burgeoning Brethren Church in Brazil and, for a few years, helped maintain contact between the Brethren Church and sister churches in the wider movement. brothers.

His ecumenical activity included representing the Church on the National Council of Churches, chairing the Fellowship Relations Committee, and being an observer at the Union of Churches Consultation.

Brown was identified as “an important national figure in opposition to the Vietnam War” when a collection of his papers was dedicated to the Brothers’ Library and Historical Archives. The program for this event read: “Dale’s 1970 book, The Christian Revolutionary, anticipates many themes later made famous by John Howard Yoder and the Sojourner community.

His commitments as a peace activist have been many and varied over the decades. As moderator of the annual conference, he presented a statement to the Senate Armed Forces Committee opposing the project and selective service. He participated in the first Brethren-Russian Orthodox Exchange in 1963 and in 1969 was appointed dean of the first summer seminar on peace between the Brethren Church and the Russian Orthodox Church, held in Geneva, Switzerland. Its entry into the Encyclopedia of Brothers notes that he “has advised numerous conscientious objectors, participated in various peace demonstrations and actively participated in several peace organizations (such as the Mouvement de action des frères, which he helped to found, as well as New Call to Peacemaking)…. He also played an important role in the so-called New Evangelism of the early 1970s and was a signatory of the Chicago Declaration of Social Concern.

Notes for a Messenger interview made after his retirement said: “He still enjoys participating in protests for peace. He was in a relationship in Washington quite recently, including one at the Pentagon…. He is active with Christian peacekeeping teams and with training youth on the Earth Peace Assembly for Peace Travel Teams. These are just a sample of the many activities Dale is still involved in.

Longtime annual conference attendees may recall his speeches at the microphone, pleading for peace and calling for reconciliation between different parts of the church, and his eagerness to engage in a conversation in the head. – face to face with those who did not agree with him. Former neighbors of Oak Park, Ill. May remember his participation in open housing marches in 1966 and how he and students from Bethany started a bond fund group. in DuPage County. Ecumenical colleagues may recall his participation in demonstrations at the 1968 Democratic National Convention on behalf of the American Friends Service Committee.

A profile of Brown as a moderator appeared in Messenger in 1972, identifying the paradoxes of his life and testimony: “Dale Brown, as others see him, is a man whose strict interpretation of the Bible leads him to sympathize with the Conservatives and to act with the radicals. Starting from a strict biblical basis and trying to be true to it, he often finds both his support and his opposition in strange neighborhoods.

The magazine told a story from a recent conference: “He found himself in a vigorous and emotional debate with Conservatives following a committee meeting they attended together. The argument, on resistance, lasted an hour and a half. At the end, Dale told them, “You know, I wouldn’t spend that much time if I didn’t love you and take you seriously, I wouldn’t care that much. His opponents replied: “We As you, because you don’t just treat us kindly. You take us seriously enough to chat with us.

Brown is survived by his daughter Deanna (Brian Harley), son Dennis (Dorothy Brown), son Kevin (Kim Pece), granddaughters and many more whom he claimed to be beloved children and fictitious parents. Plans for a memorial service will be announced.

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