Sainte-Catherine Labouré school celebrates its 60th anniversary

The Principal of St. Catherine Labouré School, Jodi Reuter, does not take the acronym for Glenview Institution lightly.

Particularly on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the Glenview Catholic School, which teaches approximately 180 students, from kindergarten to grade eight, at 3425 Thornwood Ave.

“It has always been synonymous with sharing, caring and love,” said Reuter, who has been at St. Catherine Labouré for 22 years.

“But we’ve also elevated that over the years to be academic achievement, Catholic values ​​and lifelong learning,” she said, earning double points on the “L.”

“I think with the 60th anniversary celebration, and you look up and down the halls – we have the pictures of all the graduating classes – we certainly know that we achieved all of these things with all of these graduates,” Reuters said. .

St. Catherine Labouré Church pastor Isaac Lara said the ground was laid for the school building on April 23, 1961, and its cornerstone was laid on August 26.

The school opened on January 3, 1962, and the new building was dedicated on April 8, 1962. It cost $750,000 to construct, which Reverend Lara said would cost $7.1 million at prices of today.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

The pastor said St. Catherine Labouré Church was built in 1960. While the parish’s 60th anniversary was recognized in 2020, COVID precautions prohibited a “genuine celebration”, Lara said.

“We want to include former students, teachers and families, but we also want to include the community as a whole in the appreciation of the church,” he said.

The school’s 60th anniversary will be celebrated on October 15 in tandem with the Sainte-Catherine Labouré Oktoberfest, the first time in several years that this event has taken place. Historically, Oktoberfest attracts past and present school families, alumni, parishioners, and current and retired teachers.

All are welcome to the 16-acre campus. From noon to around 4 p.m., the first section of this three-part festival is aimed primarily at families and children. From 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. there will be a balloon artist, makeup artists, a bouncy house and a pumpkin patch. The family portion ends with JG’s Reptile Road Show starting at 3 p.m.

A children’s meal, juice or water, and a German pretzel are also available for an additional charge from noon to 4 p.m. Beer, wine and other beverages will be available for purchase for adults.

A community mass will be celebrated at 5 p.m. in the adjacent Sainte-Catherine Labouré church.

After that, it’s adult time until 11 p.m., with a beer tent, the Die Muskimeisters band from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., and a disc jockey. Teachers, staff and church ministry groups created baskets of auction items, and a commemorative beer mug will be sold, along with a German meal including bratwurst, salad potatoes and sauerkraut.

“It’s just an opportunity to bring everyone together,” Lara said.

Sainte-Catherine Labouré parish has about 1,100 families, he said. The majority of students live in Glenview, Reuters said, but the parish and school also attract people from Arlington Heights, Buffalo Grove, Des Plaines, Evanston, Morton Grove, Niles, Northbrook, Prospect Heights and other communities. .

“When people come to school, they feel the diversity,” Lara said. “We are inclusive; we include everyone who comes to our doors. Most of us are from Glenview, but we are also fortunate to have other families from the suburbs around Glenview. … We have families from all these places because they see the value of Sainte-Catherine Labouré school.

The school’s anniversary celebration is the last of the notable events organized by the parish. Cardinals John Cody, Francis George and Blase Cupich have all visited it during its history – Cupich most recently after Saint Catherine Labouré created a shrine to Our Lady of Fatima.

Cupich’s standing room-only mass, conducted that day, left an impression on the cardinal.

“‘Wow, you really are a United Nations parish,'” Reuter recalled saying.

“He was referring to the diversity he saw within the congregation,” she said. “We have families from so many different countries, and we have so many ministries within the church. He testified to that, and it was really good.”

This could very well be a topic of discussion on October 15 as people return to Sainte-Catherine Labouré.

“When people come back, we hope old-timers can visit the building, walk around and revisit those days,” Reuters said.

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